Skip to main content

Decided to slide my entire 9x13 layout forward about 5 inches. This gave me room to add 13 feet of additional siding along the back wall so I can hold passenger trains (or a container lash-up) on the layout without having to remove cars. Thought I had enough room to drop a second level staging area under my layout using this added space, but just not enough room unless I used an 8% grade.

When I do this again (in my next house) I'll incorporate plenty of staging area or yard space.  And make sure I have reversing loops.

Pulled out the sidings and the plywood decking. I did not have enough support underneath this section so it tended to sag. Good time to fix that problem. The extra 5 inches also made it much easier to stand up in the corners.

IMG_20201113_161454003

The siding will run against the brick concrete wall. I have not decided yet if I will keep it a dead end or add another turnout so I don't have to back out. That means tearing out a bit of ballasted section I put in a week ago. Amazingly after sliding the "c" shaped layout forward, the three bridges still lined up pretty well. Since I knew this layout would be only temporary, there is no roadbed installed - except where I was trying out foam roadbed. Right now I am not a fan.

IMG_20201113_161523934

Attachments

Images (2)
  • IMG_20201113_161454003
  • IMG_20201113_161523934

Mike g., awesome work, I like the Menards Billboard with the cow, the dark colored city area, great idea, and train headed by a BNSF Diesel heading toward the upper tunnel portal, wow, you, my friend have come a long way. It’s an exciting layout, thanks for the update. Scouting Dad, you’ve built a very nice layout, great construction techniques, great track work, very nice. Happy Railroading Everyone 20B236A7-8DF2-41F4-B339-8A138F67856565F5D66C-C2FB-4851-8D63-70B61E34CBA5

Attachments

Images (2)
  • 20B236A7-8DF2-41F4-B339-8A138F678565
  • 65F5D66C-C2FB-4851-8D63-70B61E34CBA5

Jay - This is the first time I have been working with road bed so it may be just a learning experience.

my experience with the foam road bed and why I am not a fan as yet:

a - the track screws transmit noise into the plywood underlayment so the foam does not seem to help on the noise. looks nice though with ballast

b - I've tried both the roll and straight sections over plywood. If not glued or taped down it has to be held in place with the track and screws. I have to add more screws to keep it in place adding more sound transmission. You would think the foam would compress in curves, but it tends to ridge up so back to laying track on top. That is even when split and for 42 dia curves it is worse, 72 is manageable. 

c. I have not figured out a way to lay out the roadbed first and then the track. I suppose double faced tape is a possibility.

d. The roadbed compresses when screwed down, so you have to be precise on how far you drive the screws. On the other hand I am seeing a bit of compression with heavy steamers which is causing some operating issues both at switches and straight runs. My MTH Premier SP4449 is really finicky to the point it runs fine one direction but not the other, especially through turnouts with foam backing.

If anyone has solutions let me know. Many seem to use cork, but not sure of the sound issue since screws are still needed to fasten to something. I am now on the 7th layout change in about 3 years so I prefer to have something I can remove and reconfigure without too much trouble or investment.

As far as the temporary nature - I promised the CEO I would retire and move to another state in a couple of years to get closer to the grandkids. So I knew going in whatever I built, would not last longer than a couple of years. Honestly going through O27 tubular and used Atlas then to mostly used Ross and Gargraves has been a huge learning experience. (I really do like Atlas track and switches except for the price) Whatever I may have thought to be permanent even a year ago has changed with what I have learned through this forum and others. Even though I keep fiddling with the track layout, I consider this a learning experience for my next layout. (If only I knew then what I know now, I would have done things differently)  With the move I will get a larger train room. I have no intention of downsizing, but will keep what I want to run, sell what I don't, and minimize the shelf queens.

Best - Jeff

Chris1985: Nice locos.

Mike: The mountain scape is really much improved.

Mark: Always good to check off "to dos" on projects.

Larry and Jeff lots of action going on on your layouts.

I ran my local passenger train yesterday for a few minutes that I have posted many times on the forum so I will abstain from that today. Wish I had something to post, but too many other things going on around the house now. Maybe next week I will get around to restarting operating session no.2.

Last edited by pennsynut

John R- thanks for the alert. On-line shopping is always a crap shoot. It's sad that so many people are out there just looking for a quick buck.
Ebay and PP are very quick to help. My wife sells on Ebay and her account got hacked once. Ebay alerted us immediately and we were able to secure the account quickly. The scam involves the hacker posting fake items on your account. An unsuspecting buyer clicks buy it now and both you and the buyer are out the $$$$.

CAVEAT EMPTOR

Bob

@ScoutingDad posted:

If anyone has solutions let me know. Many seem to use cork, but not sure of the sound issue since screws are still needed to fasten to something. I am now on the 7th layout change in about 3 years so I prefer to have something I can remove and reconfigure without too much trouble or investment.

Best - Jeff

Jeff- have you considered rigid foam board? A 1" sheet over the base board will give you enough thickness to fasten track down without hitting the base.

Bob

Bob, my original 5x9 layout was 1/2 inch pink foam over 1/2 inch plywood. I also had sections of homasote over ply.  That was for the O27 track. Maybe its the wood ties on Ross and Gargraves track, but I thought those tracks screwed directly onto ply was quieter than the O27 on foam or homasote (but screwed through into the ply). This is subjective, but I thought my second loop of Atlas track ran quieter than the Ross loop.

I am playing with a decible meter app for my phone to get objective data on the sound levels of various configurations.  Right now the quietest appears to be Ross on 1x4 pine at my bridges. But I am guessing the keys are: the size of the continuous sheets, support spacing and rigidity of the deck - but that's what the meter is for. Foam should work pretty well as long as the screws do not go into the underlayment.   Jeff

Thanks Jeff - I missed this post somehow. You saved me a lot of time. Really tough on this forum to find the new topic posts unless you are following someone.

Looking at your data and comparing against my early data (my peaks are around 72db with lows around 62db) it seems to show at least a 10 db reduction by eliminating the broad sheet of plywood - my track is mainly on elevated 5 inch wide pieces of ply. Unfortunately they rest on plywood decking which was my initial base - when I had a flat layout. Of course the our meters and mics probably give different values and I only have modern MTH engines so there may not really be that much of a difference in the data.

And thanks especially for the screwed vs non-screwed data. As you said I was surprised there was so little difference. Amazing we can simply download an app to give us data instead of relying on our ears.

I may just try using the homasote as my roadbed and taper the edges.

Jeff   

John, Thank you for the tip on watching ebay and Paypal!!

Jeff (ScoutingDad), Jeff the Coaster Guy's study was way more information than I needed to convince me to not worry about screws going through my Homasote and into plywood.  I have used a decibel app on my phone to measure sound levels at various places in the church sanctuary a couple years ago.  It is still on my phone, but I never thought about using it in the train room.  Jeff advanced study was more than I would have done anyway.

I finished putting passengers in a couple cars I pained for my rainbow train. I waited years for MTH to make these in RailKing size but gave up and painted a couple of junk cars. I know there not supposed to be ribbed but they will work for me. The paint came out well and I used Testors dull coat to hide the decals. I hope Brian {Briansilvermustang} sees this post as we have talked about these for a couple years.

A13A15A16

Attachments

Images (3)
  • A13
  • A15
  • A16

Mark,  my background is an engineer so my tendency is to gather data to make decisions.  I thoroughly enjoyed Jeff's post on the db work and the resulting comments. I did decide to put in a turnout for the extra siding and put homasote over the new section of 1x5.5  pine I am using. As typical I have to do a bit of fiddling to get things to line up vertically and update sections I goofed on. Way easier to start from scratch than add in track sections. I painted backdrops for that area last week and then decided if I have to fiddle around to get those in, I might as well make a real mess. ; )

Keep posting on your layout. I am enjoying your progress.   

BTW I have to laugh there is an insurance commercial with people leaving stuff on the top of their cars and I just did the same thing with one of my backdrops I had put it on top of my van to dry overnight. The next day I left to do errands and totally forgot about it. I saw it on the street on my way home - never noticed it flying off the top of my van. Both the CEO and kids saw something lying in the street but just left it there.  Amazing no one drove over it and there was no noticeable damage to the 2x8 piece of tempered board.

Jeff

Jeff, Jeff did a bang up job on his analysis and documentation for sure.  I appreciate it!  I was a field engineer for a time and telecom technician.  Late in my working days I was a an engineer, but even at that, I implemented what others figured out.  Now I am just a bum who doesn’t want to think too hard!  😄

I have to fiddle with everything to get it too work.  I’m glad your backdrop survived.  Reminds me of a textbook I put on the roof of the car when I was taking night classes in my mid 40s.  I recovered it after it rained.  It was still usable but looked rough!

So today's activity was somewhat ironic, given a lively discussion in another thread about the merits and pitfalls of lightweight bench work construction.

Something I assume most of you know well enough, but I had to learn the hard way today: if you wanna move your table, it's easier if it's lighter. And it's harder if it's heavier.

Our layout is essentially two peninsulas, representing Cincinnati and Louisville, connected by about 10 feet of along the wall track.

Dad decided he wanted 1.75 more inches of clearance to access the back side of the Cincinnati part of the layout. (Let's just say he decided it was too tight a squeeze after having to spend significant time back there laying out track).

Given our track is pretty much sorted out and laid in where it needs to be (with all the respective custom cut pieces meticulously joined together), the decision was made to move the entire layout construction together towards the Louisville door. That would mean cutting it a very small crescent along the Louisville edge to allow for the access door swing.

Well, we did it. But it wasn't easy. Dad's not one for foul language, but there may have been a few curse words thrown about today.

I'm all for sturdy construction, but if there's ever a next time for me to build a table, there will be a bit more attention paid to lightening up the works. I'm not risking a hernia again. Oh, and I'm going to pay closer attention to my caloric consumption. Might have been easier to trim that 1.75 inches from our bellies instead...

Jeff - I was able to use furniture moving glides under 24 legs over carpet. My base was pretty sturdy so it did not rack as the three of us pushed and pulled to move the entire layout. My frame is 1x4 with 1/2 inch plywood over the top of most sections. I'd suggest getting it right the first time and not try to move a semi-finished layout, but who like to do things the easy way? Jeff

Jeff, You are absolutely right.  Do it right in the first place.  In my case, I built around the walls, and made a 1/2" miscalculation on the height somewhere which affected where the two ends meet for my future lift up bridges.  I didn't even notice it until I made a temporary lift out plywood piece with track on it.  While sitting at the computer in the next room, I noticed the lift out looked crooked.  Sure enough one side was 1/2" lower.  I could have left it that way, but I wanted level bridges.  Fortunately the Mianne topped with plywood at that area was easy to jack up 1/2".  I found the place of miscue and leveled it up.  All is now swell!

Morning guys,

Sure has been some good work being done!

Dave Ripp, Outstanding job on the new paint on the Great Northern cars! Brian will be proud of you!

Tony, the mountain is really coming along!

Jeff, Mark & Jeff, thanks for the information on the DB noise, but I have to say that the train noise doesnt bother me as I am half deaf and have to turn everything all the way up to here them. Along with my hearing aids!

Jeff the coaster guy, I am glad you and your dad were able to get your layout moved. If it makes things easier for your did it was well worth it!

Well I didnt get much done yesterday and it was the day to put snow tires on the CEO's car and then the garage door opener broke. Where I live there is nothing close that sells them so Ihad to order one on line. I

Later last night I was able to get into the train room and try out my new paint pens for my road markings as the pinstripe would not stick. Here is a photo of that. While I was in there the CEO brought out some brick road that she picked up and I think I will run that around the outter loop of the town. Here also is a photo of that

.IMG_20201115_140807624IMG_20201115_141501409

Now for the bad news, while out in the train room I noticed a water leak where the old and new roof meet. So this morning I will be up there putting down some extra flashing to try and stop the leak. I have way to much money in such a little room. Wish me luck!

I hope you all have a wonderful Monday and find time for your layout and trains!

Attachments

Images (2)
  • IMG_20201115_140807624
  • IMG_20201115_141501409

Laid down a couple of coats of light dirt brown ground and mocking up sidings and turnout placement.  The long lath strips will give me a cosmetic curved center line to work with.

IMG_9687Adjusting the level of four legsIMG_9688First coat.

There will be two converging roads crossing the tracks to feed parking lots.IMG_9694Second coat and C/L mock up.

This run-a-round will also serve the businesses in the earlier module too.  Formerly runaround action needed to utilize the branch line right of way.  With this arrangement a cut of cars will be able to be left off next to the main and switching can proceed without regard to branch line traffic.  The run-a-round will be able to hold four cars.

IMG_9695Opposite view

Attachments

Images (4)
  • IMG_9687
  • IMG_9688
  • IMG_9694
  • IMG_9695

Mike, I hope you got the source of the leak taken care of.  The roads look good including the brick road from your wife.  There are still quite a few brick streets and roads in Butler.  Our older daughter lives on the original paved road leading out of town towards Pittsburgh.  Paved with brick to this day.  I find it interesting to see how they adjusted the laying of bricks as it winds up the steep hill they live on.  I plan to put in some brick road somewhere on the layout probably at least around the stations.

Tom, I was very interested to see what you had planned for that odd shaped benchwork.  It's always great to follow your photographs.  Now I never thought of setting up 4 levels like you did to level out the 4 legs.  I do have two long and two short levels, but only used two. 

Today was spent collecting and bagging some of the leaves from across the road that blew in from the wind storm yesterday.  I miss the woods over the hill from the old house that we left 9 years ago.  I had to travel around looking for more bags too.  I did some layout work yesterday with permanently wiring and testing each section as I went.  I had a couple of times I forgot I had put in gaps and wondered why the engine stopped.    I had to pull up one switch I thought was Ross Ready, but it turned out it wasn't.  Since I think Steve used his middle name for his business, I am calling the switch an Alan Ready switch, but the underside doesn't look as nice as Ross ready, since I used wire instead of that neat stock Ross uses for their jumpers.  I didn't think of taking a photograph before reinstalling the switch.  Oh well, I will save everyone's eyes.    Oh yes, here is my wye in front of the enginehouse with a DZ2500.  The wires don't go anywhere yet, as you can see some peaking out from under the enginehouse.  I am going to take up RJT  Rick's suggestion to flip the DZ2500 180 degrees, but I will have to come up with a longer linkage to the actuating arm since the ties on that side are a smidgeon over 9/16" longer.  I think it will work out nicely.

2020-11-15 13.37.54

Attachments

Images (1)
  • 2020-11-15 13.37.54
Last edited by Mark Boyce

Tom, your work is just amazing! There is so much the rest of us can learn from all the post you have put out there! Thank you for posting!

Mark, I think the wye looks perfect and I bet you did a great job on the Alan Ready switch! I hope you can make the DZ work on the other side of the wye.

Jim, if he get to do it just once a year, then its well worth it! Plus I think they look great, you have one really big river there!

Well folks after spending a good part of the day up on the roof in the pouring down rain getting soaked threw my rain gear I think I got the leak to the train room fixed. I spent a couple hours working on roads, plus it gave me a chance to keep an eye on where the leak was.

I did a little more work with the paint pens and put down some blue tape to try and fix a little paint blead. I also worked on  the brick road that runs in front of the fire station, police station, and as you will see in the photo I am going to run it in front of the train station. Mark, when I worked at the county we had one road left that was made out of bricks and we would have to inspect every year, replace broken bricks and re sand the entire road. There was only 3 mile left of many built. I know there are alot more in the City of Seattle.

IMG_20201116_150215066IMG_20201116_150209520IMG_20201115_141501409 [1)

Its not in the picture but I also worked on the ramp for the fire station, I still have to weather it to match Menards ramp.

I hope everyone had a great day!

Attachments

Images (3)
  • IMG_20201116_150215066
  • IMG_20201116_150209520
  • IMG_20201115_141501409 (1)

Mike, The streets look great!!

I just remembered, one block from where our other daughter lives, there are a few blocks where you can see that the streetcar tracks went down the middle of the street, then curved onto another street.  They put in a course of bricks parallel to the rails on either side and perpendicular to the rest of the street.  Then of course the bricks follow the curve to the side street.  Once the tracks were pulled up, they filled in with another course of bricks.  There were two streetcar lines that ran from Pittsburgh to Butler, the Harmony Short Line and the Pittsburgh & Butler Street Railway.  My guess is the street car went to the hospital, since these tracks were on the far side of town towards Pittsburgh at the edge of town.   Pretty slick for a town of 13,000 that is 40 mile from The Burgh.  Someday, I should take a photograph, but the street is in good shape, so they won't be paving it in my lifetime. 

Mark,

The concave "odd shape" allows a 30" passage way around a TT peninsula  out of frame to the left.

When all legs have adjustable feet it helps to have a box of levels so that you do not have to keep shifting levels with each individual adjustment.   Just have a glance at the bubbles.

The intersection of each overlapping of levels is over a leg.

Patrick, great job on the coal load! I can see many more in your future! LOL

Mark, the people who laid the brick roads had to be smart and very strong people to build them to last this long!

Tom Tee, your work is looking amazing, but when you get a chance can you back up a little so we can see the TT section?

Well its Tuesday and they say its going to rain hard all day so it will be a good test for my roof repair yesterday. I plan on working on some more road work today and maybe a fence. You wont believe it but I cant find a metal coat hanger at any of the local stores. I guess they dont make them any more! LOL

I hope everyone has a fun day with there layout and trains! Please stay safe and healthy!

Ahh Mike, you are killing me.  With all the construction I try to crop my photos to hide my mess.   Just believe me for now, one of my TTs is 30" inches from the concave nose.

There is a pollution of boxes of track and turnouts, full and empty boxes of engines and cars plus scenery components which have become an eyesore.  The open ceiling rafters are all full  and I am trying to give away other boxes no longer needed.

The lack of train shows has me in a log jam of goodies.

Last edited by Tom Tee

Well I didn't like how things were going so I went to Walmart and picked up some foam core board to put over my plywood. I hope to get things looking better to me! Here is a photo of what I got done sofar. I have to get one more section to finish filling the town area!IMG_20201117_142116526

Everyone have a wonderful Hump day! I will check back in later and hope to find out you all had a great day!

Attachments

Images (1)
  • IMG_20201117_142116526
@rail posted:

Looks good. What did you use as coal?

Thanks @rail!  

I used decorative black stone which I bought at Michael's Crafts.  It's located back around the floral arranging section of Michaels.  They offer many different colors of stone ( various sizes )  and sand.   The black stone  costs considerably less than the coal I've bought at hobby shops and definitely looks the part.   I used the cardboard insert that came with the new Weaver 4 bay hopper as a platform on which to glue the stone.  I first painted the cardboard flat black.   To give  the coal a "piled up " look, I  then applied/glued  some black rubber strips to the center of the cardboard. ( Modeling clay would have been my first choice, however, I didn't have any handy. )  For a rounded contour ... I angled and glued some more rubber strips between the cardboard platform and black rubber strips  ... Next I brushed on some Elmers glue and then finally sprinkled the black diamonds onto  the glue.  I think it came out well enough.    I have one more of these cars to do, although I may weather that car before adding the coal.  

@trumptrain posted:

Thanks @rail!  

I used decorative black stone which I bought at Michael's Crafts.  It's located back around the floral arranging section of Michaels.  They offer many different colors of stone ( various sizes )  and sand.   The black stone  costs considerably less than the coal I've bought at hobby shops and definitely looks the part.   I used the cardboard insert that came with the new Weaver 4 bay hopper as a platform on which to glue the stone.  I first painted the cardboard flat black.   To give  the coal a "piled up " look, I  then applied/glued  some black rubber strips to the center of the cardboard. ( Modeling clay would have been my first choice, however, I didn't have any handy. )  For a rounded contour ... I angled and glued some more rubber strips between the cardboard platform and black rubber strips  ... Next I brushed on some Elmers glue and then finally sprinkled the black diamonds onto  the glue.  I think it came out well enough.    I have one more of these cars to do, although I may weather that car before adding the coal.  

I'll have to check that material out. I use Black Beauty; fine to represent "Chestnut", and the coarser grit for "Egg, or stove coal. I use a 1/4" luan base with 1/4" legs at each end for Weaver 2 and 3 bay hoppers. The 4 bay don't require legs. For a humped load, I use a 3/4" wide strip of 1/4" luan, about 2 inches shorter then the base. For mounds, I use 3/4" X 3/4" squares spaced evenly. I use water base urethane sprayed with a plant misting bottle, and build the load gradually, spraying the urethane on each layer until I get the profile I want. Many folks use foam, but I am very leery, as I had some foam base loads that the foam started to disintegrate, and then the coal broke off. 

Add Reply

Post
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×
×