This is a recent purchase.   I noticed this sound which others have described as a playing card on the spokes of a bicycle.  You can hear it above the normal engine sounds.

In the video, I turned off the sound to try to figure out this out. It seems to be coming from the engine before the cab.

I took it to local hobby shop and was not fixed as what they noted as not unusual for mechanical noise.  They ran power to the engine but when they tested it was not on a track with just power applied.  So this makes me think it is perhaps a roller or only when there is weight of the engine when on the track.

Couple of questions.  

1.) Is this not normal?

2) Have you experienced this before on any of your engines.

Thank you in advance.

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Last edited by jjwyatt
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Does it do it on rollers?  I have an engine that makes  a similar noise on atlas track and the wheel flanges were hitting the nubs on the track ties. 

Marty

 

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Last edited by MartyE

Have you greased the gearbox?

I've had a wiring harness rubbing the encoder wheel  on the fywheel making a buzzing sound as well.

 

" No matter how far we travel, the memories will follow in the baggage car."

Last edited by RickO

For gearbox. Yes greased

Running on Atlas so perhaps but clicking is faster then speed of engine 

Just ran again but ran Hudson after it To compare

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Thank you for the replies I have tried a few different things to try to eliminate it as per suggestions.  I have a buddy who has the ability to do it on rollers so may try that next and see what happens.   Engine works great other than this issue.  More annoying when this is the only one that does it.  

Both very smooth runners, I'm jealous!  In this case I don't personally think it's the driving wheel flanges on the ties, I feel like the frequency of the clicking is too high for that.  @MartyE what loco did you observe with this problem?

Two theories: (1) The plastic comb wheel that serves as the tach surface for speed control is rubbing on the sensor or something inside the boiler shell.  (2) What you're hearing is "slop" in the dog-bone shaft that connects the motor flywheel to the worm gear.  The dogbone could be toggling fore-and-aft in the cups of the U-joints.

To troubleshoot further you could run it with the shell off and observe.  That's the first thing I would do.  To quiet the dogbone, you could pack a little Vaseline or some viscous moly grease in those cups to stop the ball ends from slapping around.  But to totally rule out the dogbone you would have to remove it altogether.  Apply power to hear the motor and flywheel by themselves.

Honestly both locos seem to run great.  It's just a noise and I wouldn't be that concerned.  I don't know your level of mechanical skill.  But I would open it up for observation long before I would take the risk of sending it back to Lionel.  And yes, there are risks...!!

Creep, coast, and pull.  We're not talking about cold fusion here.

Thanks. Mechanical skills for what you describe maybe pushing it for me at least with newer engines. Spot on with frequency.  As a couple guys could not hear it or hear it well but both admitted they don’t hear higher frequencies well. 
Engine runs great just more my personal annoyance 

I’d still run it on another track type, tubular would be best.  You’d be surprised how long it took to figure it out. 

What I observed was the exact same noise. It's an easy check without removing the shell.  If nothing else it may save you some time.  

Marty

 

Below the Signature...

" Number One, make it "O"!"

 

Last edited by MartyE

I had a similar issue on a slightly older Legacy steamer. Judging by the frequency/rapid pace of the sound, it's definitely coming from the area of the flywheel and could easily be a stray wire touching it as it rotates. In my case the flywheel was actually touching the chassis of the engine, which I figure came about as the result of shipping damage. It took some effort to create enough separation between the two parts to stop it happening.

In My opinion , it's either the worm gear not sitting correctly in the gearbox, or the flywheel encoder ring hitting the guard or the tach reader. The noise is going the same speed as the revolutions of the motor. 

Alex

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Last edited by Alex M

@MartyE please- which Legacy loco(s) have the issue with flanges that are too large for Atlas track?

Creep, coast, and pull.  We're not talking about cold fusion here.

I believe it was my Santa Fe ATSF Northern.  After reading this thread though I may go back and check to see if I'm remembering my solution correctly.  I thought for sure it was the nubs on the track but maybe I did end up opening it and finding something.  Old age will do that.  LOL!  I'm pretty sure though I narrowed it down to the nubs but again I'll have to double check.

Marty

 

Below the Signature...

" Number One, make it "O"!"

 

Hancock52 posted:

I had a similar issue on a slightly older Legacy steamer. Judging by the frequency/rapid pace of the sound, it's definitely coming from the area of the flywheel and could easily be a stray wire touching it as it rotates. In my case the flywheel was actually touching the chassis of the engine, which I figure came about as the result of shipping damage. It took some effort to create enough separation between the two parts to stop it happening.

Thanks.   I have not taken it apart so shall see.   

MartyE posted:

I’d still run it on another track type, tubular would be best.  You’d be surprised how long it took to figure it out. 

What I observed was the exact same noise. It's an easy check without removing the shell.  If nothing else it may save you some time.  

Will be running it this weekend on other types of track 

Thanks to all for your input.   Will run it this weekend with a few other operators to see what they think in person and go from there.   I ran it once more trying to determine location and still seems to be somewhere directly in front of the cab.   Will post back onto this thread future results or root cause hopefully when found.

Take the boiler off and I bet you'll see if anything is getting hit by the motor in short order 😉.

Santa Fe, All the Way

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