I recall getting the titles of Cat Stevens' "Peace Train" and the O'Jays' "Love Train" confused as a wee lad.  

'Course, this was about the time I read a Christmas songbook and wondered why "Joy to the World" had nary a mention of Jeremiah the bullfrog...  

Mitch 

It's crackers to give a rozzer the dropsy in snide!

 

Remember, SCROUNGE!

From John Denver's CD "All Aboard":  "Jenny Dreamed of Trains" and "Daddy, What's a Train?"

From Shiloh Records CD "A Treasury of American Railroad Songs, Ballads and Folklore":  "Navisky," "Old Horny Toad," "Greenlight on the Southern," "John Santa Fe," "Ballad of the Frisco," and "Verde Valley Line."

Now, a question:  If anyone remembers a song that includes the specific refrain "in a boxcar painted blue," I would appreciate knowing the song title and media source. Somewhere, I have or had that song, but searching through my vinyl, audio cassette, and CD collections fails to locate it again.  I shall greatly appreciate any leads on it.

Night train - Jason Aldean

Crosstie walker - CCR

City of New Orleans Arlo Gunthrie

Runaway Train - Soul Asylum

Old Toy Trains - Toby Kieth

Train - 3 doors down

Locomotive Breath Jethro Tull

Casey Jones Johnny Cash

Train Train Blackfoot

 

 paigetrain

AKA Cody Parrish

modeler of the Allegheny Federation

serving Arizona and the Northeast Corridor

The Santa Fe Dash-8

Len Carparelli posted:

Here's a cool one I forgot - for all you rock & rollers:

"All Down The Line" by the Rolling Stones, which appeared on their 1974 highly acclaimed double-album "Exile On Main Street"

 

-Len Carparelli

 

Another "cool one" that doesn't get a lot of mention.... "Long Twin Silver Line" by Bob Seger (from the Against the Wind LP)

- Mike

 

 

I had occasion tonight the hear The Brothers Four sing their "500 Miles" again, reminding me of why it has been a favorite of mine for so long.

FrankM

(P.S. I realize how my saying that dates me, back to an era when I was changing from adolescence to young manhood, during the Folk Song phenomenon. And I'm glad for that. And as we are in the midst of beginning a New Year...

I drink a toast to and salute all of you...thumbnailoldbutstillplaying

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ajzend posted:
CBQer posted:

The original recording of "The City of New Orleans" by Steve Goodman.

City of New Orleans is one of the all time greats. Maybe my favorite. 
Who do you think has the best version?  
Alan

City of New Orleans is also my favorite train song. My favorite version (a tough call because many great recording artists have done it) is the one by John Denver.

In my little world, I leave this troubled world behind.

 
"Monkey And The Engineer"
    Grateful Dead
Album, "Reckoning"  1980
Songwriter,  Jesse Fuller
 
Here,  have a listen for your enjoyment  ( sorry if there is an ad )
 
Once upon a time there was an engineer.
Drove a locomotive both far and near.
Accompanied by a monkey who would sit on a stool
Watching everything the engineer would do
 
One day the engineer wanted a bite to eat,
He left the monkey sitting on the driver's seat,
The monkey pulled the throttle, the locomotive jumped the gun
And did 90 miles an hour down the mainline run.
 
Big locomotive right on time, big locomotive coming down the line.
Big locomotive No. 99, left the engineer with a worried mind. 

The engineer called up the dispatcher on the phone,
To tell him all about his locomotive was gone.
Got on the wire, switch operator to the right,
Cause the monkey's got the main line sewed up tight.
The switch operator got the message on time,
Said there's a Northbound Limited on the same main line,
Open up the switch I'm gonna let him through the hole,
Cause the monkey's got the locomotive under control.

Big locomotive right on time, big locomotive coming down the line.
Big locomotive No. 99, left the engineer with a worried mind.
 
Big locomotive right on time, big locomotive coming down the line.
Big locomotive No. 99, left the engineer with a worried mind.
left the engineer with a worried mind.
left the engineer with a worried mind.
 
Steve

Canadian Railroad Trilogy by Gordon Lightfoot.

I first came across this song in my early '20s when my brother and I were redoing the layout that my father built for us as kids.  It was a difficult process because it wasn't a full redo, we were trying to reuse much of what was already there.  The song reminded me that building a RR isn't easy.  It takes vision and sacrifice, and most of all persistence.  But in the end it's all worth it.  Have a listen!!

Creep, coast, and pull.  We're not talking about cold fusion here.

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