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I think Pete has made my point... The seller of a $1500 engine at Trainz received maybe 50%, or $750.
The seller of the $500 engine at Stouts received maybe 80%, or $400.

The buyer at Trainz was told exactly what was being sold and was given a money back guarantee and no shipping charges (I think the policy is free shipping over a certain price). The buyer at Stouts was shown a photo and a very small description, for sale as shown, and an inflated shipping charge.

In this example, the seller got the better deal from Trainz. And the buyer got the lower price from Stouts. But, the buyer at Trainz went into the deal with his eyes wide open and could return it within 30 days and the buyer at Stouts was basically told, "Buyer beware."

So, if I am a seller, Trainz "may" be the better choice, and I get to know what is happening as I go into the deal. If I am a buyer, I will check out both sites, but I want a steep discount whenever there is little description, no guarantee, and steep shipping charges. I have bought from both companies and I have been satisfied with both companies. I have enjoyed big discounts at Stouts and I have no complaints about the price I have paid (I drop out of bidding when it goes above 50% of my estimated value). I have enjoyed the security of buying from Trainz and I have no complaints about their customer service.

But I have not sold through either company. Wouldn't it be great if someone sold half with Trainz and half with Stouts or Cabin Fever? Then they could report back to us with actual numbers.

There is also Train City in Cocoa beach, FL.  They buy the whole collection and then sell it off through on-line retail, ebay, and choochoo auctions.  They will travel across country to pack and pickup trains.  The will quote you a price, and if you accept, pay you. No hassle.

If you sell via auction they price you get depends on the demand and rarity in addition to condition.  I've see engines and NIB Atlas reefers go for twice their retail price.  Of course, I've see the reverse.

Jan

Here's my approach. Do nothing. Enjoy my trains till the very end. Let my son (a train person) figure out what to do. My present concern is, as baby-boomers die off, the market will be flooded with trains. So, who knows what the market will be like a few decades from now? Also, I never up-sized, so I do not have to down-size. Mark

Last edited by barrister.2u

I would love to see  what database Trainz -  "Once we have made an inventory of the collection, we will send the trains through our proprietary Trainz valuation process, to determine the Market Value of the trains.", uses as a reference.  I know they get a bit odd on pricing,  some things start out at a good price, others quite a bit high.   I am watching 2 specialty cars they have, one is new in the box, one is used, the NIB started out cheaper than the used boxless one, but now after several weeks they are neck and neck.  The longer something remains unsold at Trainz, the less expensive it gets.  If there is anything you just can't seem to get a handle on is what the price of any train item constitutes a good deal.  You use Greenberg's and people say that is a waste, you try and use what things have sold for on places like Ebay, and you see where identical items and sets in identical condition can sell for an amazing difference, $50 for this one, and $200 for its competition.  I think it is all a galactic alignment of a particular item, listed at a certain price, and a particular buyer that wants it, all converging at the same time and space.    I think in Vegas, this is called a crap shoot, throw in caveat emptor, PT Barnum's observation of a sucker born every minute, and let the wheeling and dealing begin.

@CALNNC posted:

I would love to see  what database Trainz -  "Once we have made an inventory of the collection, we will send the trains through our proprietary Trainz valuation process, to determine the Market Value of the trains.", uses as a reference.  I know they get a bit odd on pricing,  some things start out at a good price, others quite a bit high.   I am watching 2 specialty cars they have, one is new in the box, one is used, the NIB started out cheaper than the used boxless one, but now after several weeks they are neck and neck.  The longer something remains unsold at Trainz, the less expensive it gets.  If there is anything you just can't seem to get a handle on is what the price of any train item constitutes a good deal.  You use Greenberg's and people say that is a waste, you try and use what things have sold for on places like Ebay, and you see where identical items and sets in identical condition can sell for an amazing difference, $50 for this one, and $200 for its competition.  I think it is all a galactic alignment of a particular item, listed at a certain price, and a particular buyer that wants it, all converging at the same time and space.    I think in Vegas, this is called a crap shoot, throw in caveat emptor, PT Barnum's observation of a sucker born every minute, and let the wheeling and dealing begin.

I myself would not use them after reading up on what they'll pay.

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