This right angle adapter, (575),  made cutting easier.  IMO.   The Dremel blades are slightly smaller.   These Dremel tools are small motor, light duty, at best, IMO.  You would find these cutting blades, may be, a bit more than the Dremel was designed for.   It will overheat.  

426, 426B (1 1/4" cutters), 456 (1 1/2" cutter)   Requires 402 mandrel.  

Mike has the right idea, the right angle adapter or the flexible wand handle allows you to get truly parallel with the track and get a good perpendicular cut.

I go through a lot of cutoff wheels, so I buy them in quantity here: Reinforced 1.5 inch Cutoff Wheel - 1/16 inch holes - 100pc.  While not "quite" as consistent as the real Dremel brand, 100 for $12.97 is a lot easier to live with.  These work just fine for me.  I also have them with the 1/8" hole for larger mandrels from the same source.

Reinforced 1.5 inch Cutoff Wheel - 1/16 inch holes - 100pc

Pete, I have that exact tool with a 2" cutoff wheel in it, I use it for cutting brass tubing for smoke unit installations.  My Gargraves track is ordered, and I'll likely be trying it for the track as well.

Mike CT posted:
William 1 posted:

If you don’t get a perfect cut with the cutoff wheel you can fine tune it with a file.  Nobody’s perfect.

Bench sander to true the ends. 

Mike, Will these cutoff wheels work and cut Atlas 3 rail track ?

George

Norton posted:

Gargraves sells heavy duty 2" disks along with a mandrel that will fit into a Dremel. Our club uses them along with a small bench tool from Harbor Freight. 

Pete

I've looked at that cutoff tool but I did not think any O gauge track would fit in it.  Their 6"/6amp cut-off saw ($46) worked for me for a little while until I burned it up cutting aluminum track shelving

image_26440

For $30 more, you can always get their 14"/2hp cut-off saw.  Probably works well on that shelving.

61389_W3-11

Ron

 

TCA, TTOS, NCT, LCCA, PRRT&HS

 

Volunteers don't get paid, not because they are worthless, but because they are priceless!  Author Sherry Anderson

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I use a right angle grinder fitted with the thin metal cutting blades to cut my tubular track.  Works better than a Dremel, because it will allow you to make a square cut on the rails.   The hell shown is not the wheel mentioned.   

150683_2000x2000 

Dan Padova

 

"In the course of my life I have had to eat my words, and I must confess it was a wholesome diet"..........Winston Churchill

                                                                                                                                        

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Seacoast posted:
Mike CT posted:
William 1 posted:

If you don’t get a perfect cut with the cutoff wheel you can fine tune it with a file.  Nobody’s perfect.

Bench sander to true the ends. 

Mike, Will these cutoff wheels work and cut Atlas 3 rail track ?

Yes, with care.   A little more time to cut each rail.     I had done some Atlas in place with a hacksaw blade.  Adding auto-non-derail and the Atlas 6924 relay board.  

Milwaukee sawzall blade with handle.      

Older Sawzall, a little more intense. Sawzall probably not a good idea.

The problem with using a chop saw comes if your laying flex track.  You'll still need a dremel to square up even if you pre cut with the chop saw.   Those rails slide when final positioning flex track.

Charlie a.k.a MichiganRailRoad714 - D3R - NMRRC


 

 

MichRR714 posted:

The problem with using a chop saw comes if your laying flex track.  You'll still need a dremel to square up even if you pre cut with the chop saw.   Those rails slide when final positioning flex track.

As we worked this Gargraves flex track around the curves, the ends were squared, as mentioned, before the next piece was added. 

 

If you have a lot of track to cut go to Harbor Freight and purchase a 41/2" angle grinder.  Usually they are on sale for $9.99 to $12.99.  You do not need to buy the more expensive ones.  While these do die after a while so did my $99 Milwaukees.  The metal discs come in 10 packs for around $5.  If you get on the mailing list there will always be 20% off coupons coming in the mail.

Mostly I use them to cut 1/4" steel pipe and plate.  Track should not be a problem and Safety  should always be First. 

A chop saw is useful for cutting straight filler pieces. You still need a portable tool for squaring the curves after they have been laid down. For anyone starting a big layout a chop saw will pay for itself in short order saving time on finishing work.

Pete

The angle grinder at HF looks like a reasonable bet.  For the few times I'd actually use it, there's no reason to spend a ton of money on it.

gunrunnerjohn posted:

I think this would be ideal for cutting track, I may consider it.

That’s exactly what I was going to suggest. I have one I used for cutting track as well as other things. Not a huge investment and is not something you may use all the time but it is very handy when you need it. HF has a lot of sales and coupons just keep an eye out you can probably get it a little cheaper. 

https://www.harborfreight.com/...t-off-saw-61204.html

      

Chris.

 

Home of the C.L.&M railroad

 

 

 

 

  

Mike CT posted:
William 1 posted:

If you don’t get a perfect cut with the cutoff wheel you can fine tune it with a file.  Nobody’s perfect.

Bench sander to true the ends. 

All nice, but I just use the same reinforced cutoff wheel to dress the ends of the track as necessary after the cut is made - not a file and not a bench sander.

This is not a complicated process, nor does it require "fancy" tools. Of course, if you already have a bench sander (I don't), rock on. 

I certainly would imagine that cutting Fastrack wouldn't be an issue for the cutter.  As to how you mate the Fastrack again, that's another question.

gunrunnerjohn posted:

I certainly would imagine that cutting Fastrack wouldn't be an issue for the cutter.  As to how you mate the Fastrack again, that's another question.

My idea would be to cut the ends from a piece of fastrack and use regular tubular pins to attach those to both ends of a measured cut if that makes any sense.  I saw and article in OGR sometime ago where someone did that.  The only difference was that they used a standard hand driven mitre box to this trick. 

Mike CT posted:
MichRR714 posted:

The problem with using a chop saw comes if your laying flex track.  You'll still need a dremel to square up even if you pre cut with the chop saw.   Those rails slide when final positioning flex track.

As we worked this Gargraves flex track around the curves, the ends were squared, as mentioned, before the next piece was added. 

 

I didn't try to get the curves exactly scientifically perfect, as the "real" ones are not generally such.  But they look good and the trains don't derail .. good enough for an old Irishman I guess  lol!

Blake Morris posted:
gunrunnerjohn posted:

I certainly would imagine that cutting Fastrack wouldn't be an issue for the cutter.  As to how you mate the Fastrack again, that's another question.

My idea would be to cut the ends from a piece of fastrack and use regular tubular pins to attach those to both ends of a measured cut if that makes any sense.  I saw and article in OGR sometime ago where someone did that.  The only difference was that they used a standard hand driven mitre box to this trick. 

Here ya go:

https://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/...tom-fastrack-fitters

Lew

Growing old is so much more fun than the only alternative.

I use the Dremel EZ-Lock system in the hand extension - it is a 1 1/2" reinforced wheel with an reinforced arbor hole with a quick locking system. 

I switch between the thin blade and the metal blade depending on how accurate I need the cut or to minimize loss of track. The right angle attachment looks like a good idea.

Good for on table trimming.

The small Harbor Freight chop saw looks like it would be good for doing a lot of cuts - like an all flex layout build. This gives a good square and plumb cut.

SAFETY GLASSES ARE A MUST!!!!!

 

 

Carl

Arctic Railroad

I have dremel also. I bought Milwaukee 9 volt battery dremel type tool. Their cutoff wheels'seem' more robust last a little longer. I use my big metal cutoff saw. I use a face shield. I've also used my ,dont laugh,wood ,metal cutoff miter saw with a fine blade,in a pinch. Use it slowly so doesnt grab.

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