Skip to main content

Replies sorted oldest to newest

If you want to use a rattle can, stay with the Krylon Fusion or 2X Maxx    Designed for Plastics.

Also Rust-Oleum Universal

and lastly Duplicolor Metal Cast

While these aren't trains, I use the above extensively on some of my stage rig keyboard that have plastic shells.

Rust-Oleum Hammered Copper Universal

copper

DuplicColor Metal Cast

dupli

I did just find this in their catalog

rustoleum

I have also used these brand on Lexan RC car bodies

Attachments

Images (3)
  • copper
  • dupli
  • rustoleum

Years ago, I was warned of another issue with 12 inch to the foot paints.   My guess it applies more to brush paints, but I was told that pigment in model paints is ground finer that that used in normal paint for full size things.    So if you use it, you risk filling in all the details cast or etched into the model.

@prrjim posted:

Years ago, I was warned of another issue with 12 inch to the foot paints.   My guess it applies more to brush paints, but I was told that pigment in model paints is ground finer that that used in normal paint for full size things.    So if you use it, you risk filling in all the details cast or etched into the model.

In my opinion that is an "old wives tale". I remember back when EMD had a VERY large HO layout just across the hall from the Hourly Cafeteria, and quite a few of the guys would get a small pint of the Dupont Acrylic Lacquer paint from the EMD production paint shop. Many, MANY HO models were spray painted with prototypical Dupont paint, just like the real locomotives.

Most of my custom projects were made using "box store spray" paints and/or Testor's spray paints, I've been happy with the results., a thin primer coat first. Make sure the box store cans say "for plastics". I usually finish with Testor's Dullcoat on plastic models.

For Standard Gauge tin restorations and customs, I've been very happy with the coverage and shine that can be obtained using box store rattle can paints

I used a Rust-Oleum rattle can on one of my Weaver GP38 projects.  The first attempt was too thick (outdoors, windy day), so it was re-stripped with Heavy Duty Easy Off Oven Cleaner in the yellow can.  Second attempt with more patience and lighter coats was much better.  The 2X Ultra Cover sprays a lot of material quickly, so be ready for it.

IMG_4726

IMG_4803

IMG_4804

I am a big fan of the Tamiya spray primers and paints.  This is TS-49 Bright Red sprayed over white primer & paint.

SLSF 642 right side 20230504

I find spray bombs convenient for painting O scale models.  I picked up a can of Tru-Color TCP-4015 Dark Gloss Blue from my LHS to see if it's a close match for Mopac Jenks Blue.  I'll do a spoon test to see if spraying over Tamiya fine white and gray primers make a difference.  If not, then it's back to the airbrush.

Happy modeling!

Tim

Like pretty much everyone else who has commented on this, I find "rattle cans" work just fine.

Here's a "before" and "after" of a Standard Gauge #10 I did a year or so ago:

#10 Before

10 done

...and the color options now are immense, which I suspect can be traced to the decorators/home improvement field, where these get used a lot. Pretty much any arts/crafts/hardware store will have dozens and dozens of color and finishes.

Mark in Oregon

Attachments

Images (2)
  • #10 Before
  • 10 done

I've used store brand safe for plastics, spray paints and model paints and the issue between the two has always been surface prep, and how the paint was applied.  You can put a heavy coat on your lawnmower and not worry about it, but you have to finesse it with a model.  I remember getting spray can paint from Navy logistics 50 years ago, that came in a silver painted can with a white paper label stuck on.  I stripped off the label and the silver paint off a few of the cans one time when things were slow, and under the silver were things like 'Final Net', 'Aqua Net' and 'Breck' hairspray.  I guess they got a discount on can stock overruns.  The stripper that took off the silver paint did not put a dent in the paint of the orignal product.

@Hot Water posted:

In my opinion that is an "old wives tale". I remember back when EMD had a VERY large HO layout just across the hall from the Hourly Cafeteria, and quite a few of the guys would get a small pint of the Dupont Acrylic Lacquer paint from the EMD production paint shop. Many, MANY HO models were spray painted with prototypical Dupont paint, just like the real locomotives.

Absolutely agree, ….if you can not find the exact match of color you desire, you can use automotive paints, or industrial coatings such as y’all used at EMD. Reduction is everything. Reducer is simply the vehicle carrying the color to the workpiece. That’s broken down into its simplest form. Once the reducer has evaporated off, all that’s left is the color. The more reducer used, the thinner the paint. I spray a gazillion models a year using DuPont ( now Axalta ) coatings. The finish is beyond compare, and even better than the model manufacturers can provide. I’d bet those HO models sprayed with the actual EMD color were just breathtaking,……

The problem these guys are having using rattle cans are all the crazy propellant components mixed in the can. Harvesting rattle can paints doesn’t get rid of the propellants. The propellants can cause the issues seen above in Ron’s workpiece. They can cause bunching & gathering, and in worse cases, can attack substrates & plastics. If y’all want accuracy, and a finish better than any factory could give, you need the basic paint, a reducer, and some sort of gun to atomize the two. Be it a spray gun, or air brush.

Pat

Just to further develop the conversation and my education, it seems to be inferred that I did not use primer.

I did.  This is a two-tone model.  So I sprayed with Tamiya Primer, then sprayed Tamiya yellow only where I needed it.  Then I masked the yellow and re-sprayed yellow over the tape.  Then I did the green.

It appears the green covered the raw primer and most of the yellow pretty good.  Where it struggled was the lines and indentations.  So what should I have done?

Here is a sample pic during my yellow paintings showing the primer coat.

IMG_20240216_180821794

Attachments

Images (1)
  • IMG_20240216_180821794

It’s not your technique, or your base coat primer giving you the fits on your above video of your green painted diesel shell, it’s simply the ingredients inside the can messing your work piece up. Lots of agents at play in rattle can paints. None of which you can control no matter how hard you try. Many rattle cans use propane, and or butane as the propellant, not to mention accelerators or retarders as part of the composition. You can’t control these chemicals. Once you’ve shook the can, they’re in there. How they’re going to react to your workpiece can literally be anyone’s guess…..So when you’re using paint & reducer, you’re in the driver’s seat. More reducer, less paint, faster flash time, and the thinner the coats go on, & vise versa. Obviously you know how to do the math on all the other gazzillion models we’ve seen you paint, …..So in a nutshell, it’s kinda like stay in your lane, you know how to work your model paint, you know the cocktails work, & you know the delivery system. Above, in your video, you were trying to be a chemist, not a painter…..you didn’t do anything different that the rattle can would’ve delivered, you just added air to the mixture. …..I hate rattle cans …..I think they should be banned from the earth,…..😉

Pat

I agree with the use of model paints like Tamiya  , Testors , etc. when trying to get a fine finish........

.......however I have had good luck using Krylon spray when shaken well , heating the can in hot water ( being careful not too get it too hot ) and spraying when the weather is sunny and above 70 degrees.

For priming I have found the Duplicolor spray Adhesive promoter and Primer works well..   It dries clear and it appears to have very little build up but does require color painting to be done in about 10 or 15 minutes.

God speed all

Last edited by Dallas Joseph
@Hot Water posted:

In my opinion that is an "old wives tale". I remember back when EMD had a VERY large HO layout just across the hall from the Hourly Cafeteria, and quite a few of the guys would get a small pint of the Dupont Acrylic Lacquer paint from the EMD production paint shop. Many, MANY HO models were spray painted with prototypical Dupont paint, just like the real locomotives.

HotWater, I remember that layout at the plant, My Dad R.I.P. worked as a fitter/welder their till he retired in 1993, as a young kid he always took us to the parties/ open houses, many great memories.



.......however I have had good luck using Krylon spray when shaken well , heating the can in hot water ( being careful not too get it too hot ) and spraying when the weather is sunny and above 70 degrees...

Absolutely heating it up a little first makes a world of difference; (the same thing applies to the drywall touch-up "orange peel" spray.)

"..above 70 degrees..." Here on the Central Coast, we might get two days a year like that!

Mark in Oregon

Ron, you paint a lot…so invest in your future and buy an airbrush…not one of those cheap HF brands, something decent like a Badger or along those lines…you can get parts if needed for them and their a quality product…$80-$180 is cheap vs your hassle/time of stripping a few projects rattle cans messed up…buy quality paint, it’s worth the cost, great results and one/done…it’s a few extra dollars, worth it…Pat is absolutely correct, when you control the paint/thinner ratios/pressure etc, you are directing the “show” and the  results are worth the learning curve…now days, YT has hundreds of DIY airbrush videos to learn from…you seem to be getting serious about painting, step up your game to the pro level …

Throw the propellant cans in the trash…buy a good compressor…they last forever…had one for 35+ years, still strong…used compressed nitrogen last five years, never looked back…it’s absolutely dry and you won’t need “water traps” or “filters”…painted in thunderstorms with the shop doors open, humidity is no longer a worry…no effect…great results…

Been painting for 40+ years and tried all the “secrets” and “cheats” of rattle cans…the stuff I paint can’t be done with them…airbrush will open a new chapter in your hobby adventure and advance your skillset, all great things…soon you’ll be a pro and able to do things impossible with rattle cans…fade paint, blend, mix your own clear coats, weathering…good luck, let me know if you need anything, glad to help.

Last edited by 86TA355SR

I am with the few rattle can fans here.  I have had some success with canned spray paint.  Even with cheap Walmart paint several years ago but now their paint seams too thin to cover like it did and fewer colors are available.  The name brands like Krylon, Rust-oleum, etc. are still good.  I like the convenience of rattle cans and have an air brush but find it a lot of effort to clean every thing up.  I mostly paint modified rail cars for a 50s style layout.  I do a lot of brush painting with a large selection of Testor's little jars of enamel paint.  I also have four apple boxes of spay paint cans, most used,  and when they will not spray I release the gas if they have any and hand brush the paint on.

Charlie

Last edited by Choo Choo Charlie

Add Reply

Post

OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
800-980-OGRR (6477)
www.ogaugerr.com

×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×
×