Interiors are fairly easy to make. Scale City has a lot of interior parts. Northeastern scale lumber sells wood seats. Local hobby chain stores such as Michael's and Joanns sell wood, plastic, paper, and all kinds of cheap stuff you can use to build with. Hennings Trains sells the overhead light conversions.

I usually figure roughly $30.00 a car. A little expensive, but more unique than a molded plastic interior.

GGD (Sunset 3rd Rail) did heavy weight pullmans in the paint jobs for the RRs but lettered PULLMAN and in PUllman Green just lettered PUllman.  

They did a !2-1 and I think an 8-1-2.    The 12-1 is 12 sections and 1 drawing room.   I think the 8-1-2 is 8 sections, one drawing room and 2 bedrooms.   

These are full scale cars done in both 2 rail and 3 rail.   There is a photo below.

Golden Gate Depot Model Trains

And if you want to build  your own model, you can still find Walthers Kits at train shows in both full scale and "Shorty" versions that you can build and paint letter specifically to your wants.  

Also on the Walthers, you can easily find "junquers" at train shows that you can rebuild and repaint at very reasonable prices.

 

After reading this thread it seems that there are more Pullmans available than first thought.   I have the set of Pullmans from the 90's Commodore Vanderbilt set, and I have always admired them.  Silhouettes don't both me (after all, at this age I'm just a shadow of myself anyway).  They are sturdy, well made and heavy.

I would think that passenger sets that match the cars to the engine would sell better.  Also, making cars that you can run with any road name would be a disincentive to  a manufacturer.

Alan 

There were two pullmans by the way.    Originally it was all one company until the government made them divest or split.     One part operated the first class cars on the through trains.     These cars were generally the sleepers and parlor cars.     These were the accomodations that the more wealthy travelers used.    The employees that staffed these cars worked for Pullman, not the RR.     I think they still operated cars into the lightweight era.  Pullman operated no coaches or baggage cars or mail cars. I am pretty sure they did not operate diners.

The second business they had was building cars.    They built all kinds of cars I think even in the heavy weight era.    In the lightweight/streamline era they built all sorts of things that included, coaches, diners, sleepers, baggage, mail etc.    These cars were bought by the various RRs.    Pullman had two major competitors that I am aware.   The bigger one was Budd and the smaller I think was ACF.    If you read the history of the building of the streamliners,  you will often see Pullman or Budd listed at the builder of the train cars, and sometimes ACF.

So if you thinking of cars built by pullman, it could be lots of kinds of cars, but if you are thinking of the nice first class cars operated by Pullman, it should only be Sleepers and Parlour cars.

@prrjim posted:

 One part operated the first class cars on the through trains. These cars were generally the sleepers and parlor cars. These were the accomodations that the more wealthy travelers used. The employees that staffed these cars worked for Pullman, not the RR. I think they still operated cars into the lightweight era.

I was quite sure I'd seen Pullman cars from the lightweight era, and just checking real quickly, I found photos of steamlined Pullman cars operating on the Union Pacific and the Pennsylvania. They operated on other roads as well. Interestingly, the Pennsylvania photo I looked at was a Pullman observation car on a Fleet of Modernism train.

I just did a little research and found the first fleet of modernism cars were built for the PRR Flagship trains in 1928 - specifically the Broadway.    the Pullman car operations was spun off to the RRs in 1947 and the last Fleet of Modernism design cars were built in 1949.     In both cases the style of cars built seems to be sleepers and parlour-Lounge cars.    The original observation cars in 1938 had sleeping compartments and observation lounge at the back.

You are right, I read 1938 and missed typed my post as 1928.    The article I read said the final 2 were built in 1949 however.   But it was a Wiki article so those are open anyone can write whatever.

Add Reply

Post
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×
×