I am trying to wire my four 022 switches using the fixed voltage plugs.  I am powering the track with a KW Multi-Control Trainmaster Transformer.  I have purchased at 1033 transformer that I would like to use to power the switches.  

To power the track I have three clip-ons that are connected to the KW transformer through a MTH 50 1014 port terminal block.

I have attempted to connect the switches to the A-C-U on the 1033 transformer as per the wiring diagram in the 1033 Operating Instructions.  I have tried routing the wire connecting the A terminal to the port terminal block.  With this wiring when I begin to run the train the lights on the switches dim.

So instead of wiring through the port terminal block, I wired directly to a fourth clip on.  When I do this the 1033 transformer will operate the train.

 What am I doing wrong?

 

Thanks in advance for your help.

Original Post

I'm not familiar with the 1033 transformer, but I would try a wire connected to the fixed voltage plug and the A terminal (not the U terminal)  of the 1033 transformer. Then, insert the fixed voltage plug in the opening for it on the O22 switch. Then, attach the three wires from the switch controllers to the posts for them on the switch. Then, turn on the power from the 1033 transformer and test the switch.

If you do the above and the switch works, then you need to get or create a separate port terminal block (or something similar) and run a wire from the A post on the 1033 transformer to the new terminal block, and then wires from the terminal block to each fixed voltage plug.

You may need as much as 18 volts of power for the 022 switches to operate well. I use a separate ZW transformer to provide 16 to 18 volts to my 9 022 switches on my layout. Arnold

In my little world, I leave this troubled world behind.

You need to connect the U side of the 1033 transformer to the auxiliary power posts on the switches, and connect the A side of the 1033 to the outside rail of the layout tracks. That will give you 5 to 16 vac to power the switches. Adjust the voltage as you desire on the switches.

Chuck TCA LCCA ARRL BMWMOA

cjack posted:

You need to connect the U side of the 1033 transformer to the auxiliary power posts on the switches, and connect the A side of the 1033 to the outside rail of the layout tracks. That will give you 5 to 16 vac to power the switches. Adjust the voltage as you desire on the switches.

Chuck, I agree that would give power from the track to the switches. However, what about having the O22 switches independently powered (not from the track) by using the fixed voltage plugs, and using a transformer different from the one that powers the track?

The OP said he is using a KW for power to the track, and the 1033 to power the switches.

In my little world, I leave this troubled world behind.

No, unless I don't understand, I suggested connecting the U side of the 1033 to the auxiliary power input to the switches. And the A side of the 1033 (which is actually the common lead on a 1033 for the purpose of the variable output) must be connected to the outside rail of the system. The outside rails of the system include the "common" side of the switches.

Chuck TCA LCCA ARRL BMWMOA

mlaughlinnyc posted:

I assemble many O22 switches from parts.  I always use WD-40 on the friction causing parts of the mechanism, but not on electrical contact surfaces.  That reduces the voltage need from 18 or more to not more than 15.

Malcolm Laughlin

These switches require 18 vac or more?

Chuck TCA LCCA ARRL BMWMOA

I have the identical setup that you’re using,  JCMYERS. 

For the KW I used U as the common, and A & B to power two separate L shaped loops. 

To power the 14 O22’s I’m using throughout the loops, I’m using the 1033’s C as common, A for 16 fixed volts, and B for 11 fixed volts.  I’m also using two MTH 24 port terminal blocks to supply voltage to accessories.  One terminal block uses 11v, the other 16v.  Accessories like fixed voltage plugged switches, icing station & American Flyer baggage smasher & others love the 16v.  Some accessories like the 494 beacon, AF barrel loader & AF sawmill plus others like the 11v.  

I have ALL of the commons linked by jumper wires running between the U on the KW, the C on the1033, and both main negative (common) black posts of the two MTH terminal blocks.  The KW’s hot A&B do not run through the two terminal blocks, only to their respective tracks.  The 1033’s A post is connected to the red (hot) post on my 16v terminal block, and the B post is connected to red (hot)  post 11v terminal block.   

This has worked flawlessly, and I haven’t found the need to instead use the variable voltage option on the 1033. 

Hope this helps!

Tom

747D7E01-6F36-4EBA-BFC9-CB8C02BF3552

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cjack posted:
mlaughlinnyc posted:

I assemble many O22 switches from parts.  I always use WD-40 on the friction causing parts of the mechanism, but not on electrical contact surfaces.  That reduces the voltage need from 18 or more to not more than 15.

Malcolm Laughlin

These switches require 18 vac or more?

18 Only when there is a lot of friction.  after applying WD-40 and working the mechanism several times , most do well on 14, but better 15 to be sure of good operation.

Short answer (no pun intended) flip the plug on one transformer.

Long answer: Why?

When working with two (or more) transformers, the first step is to make sure they are in phase with each other. The easiest way to check this is to take wires from the the common posts on each, and just touch them together. Spark means they are out of phase! Solution is to unplug one transformer, and flip the plug around 180 degrees, then retest. No spark means they are in phase. Mark both plugs with a dot of paint or something so you'll know which way it should go if you ever unplug them.

Now that they are in phase, tie the grounds together. They will always go to the outside rails, and to the one side of accessories, per instructions for each device.

Back to the switches, the 022's will take the ground from the rails. If you don't use the fixed voltage plug, they will take the hot from the center rail. By inserting the plug, you are disconnecting the the center rail connection, and substituting the screw terminal on the plug. Now take a hot wire from your 1033 transformer, that supplies 16 - 18 volts, and connect it to the plug, et voila.

eddie g posted:

As I said, use a LW transformer.

It doesn't matter what transformers he uses, if they aren't properly phased, connecting the commons will cause a short. This is why the lights are dimming on his switches. 

Big_Boy_4005 posted:
eddie g posted:

As I said, use a LW transformer.

It doesn't matter what transformers he uses, if they aren't properly phased, connecting the commons will cause a short. This is why the lights are dimming on his switches. 

While it is good to phase match transformers, the aux power input on an 022 switch is isolated from the center rail and phasing the source of the voltage to the aux power input posts is not a problem and has nothing to do with whatever problem he's having.

In fact, you can use DC voltage to the aux power post on a 022 switch and it will change with a snap better than using an AC voltage.

Chuck TCA LCCA ARRL BMWMOA

OK Chuck, but I always thought if you wanted to have a true common, they needed to be phased the same on the primary, then tied together on the secondary. I know I did this with the ZW and VW I use on my portable layout.

My regular layout is a totally different animal, nothing postwar about it, not track, switches, trains, nor power supplies. I know my power supplies are phased together, because I installed the primary wiring myself and the power cords are grounded.

True worries when tying both sides of the secondaries together, but in this case you’re only tying one side of the secondaries together and calling it Common. As far as the track power knows, there’s nothing connected to it since the other side (the A connection) is not connected. And that’s because the switch aux power plug disconnects the switch power from the track center rail when you insert the plug.

Chuck TCA LCCA ARRL BMWMOA

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