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@Ed Mullan posted:

Could it be that she's operating in simple from a start at Helmstetters, and compound in the second video?

Ed

No. In fact ALL compound articulated "start in simple" by way of the "simpling valve", otherwise the locomotive could not start a train. Note that in the upper video, starting out, there are four distinct exhausts per revolution of the front engine (the big low pressure cylinders), while in the second video (at a higher speed), it almost sounds like one exhaust "note" is missing.

Last edited by Hot Water

If you listen carefully on the first video, most of the diesel noise is coming from the power car just in front of the F-40.  A guess is the F-40 was there for the dynamic brakes going back downhill.

Figure they are learning on the job when it comes to transition from simple to compound or even just deciding if the valves are working correctly.

Looking forward to seeing this brute working hard first hand.  Spent a lot of time looking her over when she was at the museum some years ago.

@bbunge posted:

If you listen carefully on the first video, most of the diesel noise is coming from the power car just in front of the F-40.  A guess is the F-40 was there for the dynamic brakes going back downhill.

Figure they are learning on the job when it comes to transition from simple to compound or even just deciding if the valves are working correctly.

Remember that there is no "manual control" of changing from simple to compound. I believe the N&W Y6 class compound articulated steam locomotives were the only ones that were set-up so that the Engineer could manually introduce "live superheated steam" into the low pressure cylinders, for long sustained low speed pulls.

Looking forward to seeing this brute working hard first hand.  Spent a lot of time looking her over when she was at the museum some years ago.

@Hot Water posted:

No. In fact ALL compound articulated "start in simple" by way of the "sampling valve", otherwise the locomotive could not start a train. Note that in the upper video, starting out, there are four distinct exhausts per revolution of the front engine (the big low pressure cylinders), while in the second video (at a higher speed), it almost sounds like one exhaust "note" is missing.

@Hot Water posted:
Remember that there is no "manual control" of changing from simple to compound. I believe the N&W Y6 class compound articulated steam locomotives were the only ones that were set-up so that the Engineer could manually introduce "live superheated steam" into the low pressure cylinders, for long sustained low speed pulls.

HW,
You are off base again. Read the following: "Compound Articulated Locomotives".

Engineers that I have worked noted that it wasn't necessary to "simple" an engine to start a train. This would be especially true when doing light switching.

As for the 1309 in the video, it seems to me that in the second video the train is drifting more so than pulling. My question is, why so much smoke? Even when the train stops, there is a significant amount of smoke.

@Big Jim posted:

HW,
You are off base again. Read the following: "Compound Articulated Locomotives".

Engineers that I have worked noted that it wasn't necessary to "simple" an engine to start a train. This would be especially true when doing light switching.

The "simpling valve" I referred to is NOT in the cab, nor under control by the Engineer (the N&W Y6 Class locomotives had an additional valve arrangement for the Engineer), it is built into the steam input supply to the rear, high pressure cylinders. Thus, when starting, a small amount of live steam is sent to the front, low pressure cylinders in order to provide some "starting steam", since the rear high pressure cylinders have not yet exhausted any steam forward to the low pressure cylinders.

As for the 1309 in the video, it seems to me that in the second video the train is drifting more so than pulling. My question is, why so much smoke?

They are still learning how to properly fire the 1309, especially since there hasn't been a steam locomotive on the WMSR for some 3 or more years.  Also not, that the over-fire jet/canisters have not yet been re-installed.

Even when the train stops, there is a significant amount of smoke.

@Hot Water posted:
The "simpling valve" I referred to is NOT in the cab, nor under control by the Engineer

You didn't read did you?
There is a "simpling valve" in the cab under direct control of the engineer. Sometimes it is labeled a "Starting Valve", sometimes it is called an "Emergency Valve". Whatever it is called, it is under the control of the engineer.
The valves that you are refering to are 1.) the "Reducing Valve". It reduces high pressure steam to a lower pressure steam in order to admit it to the large low pressure cylinders. And, 2.) the intercepting valve. This is the valve that closes off the high pressure exhaust chamber from the low pressure receiver pipe. This is the valve that it under the control of the engineer if he so desires.

Last edited by Big Jim

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