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I have the DCS Remote Control Set with TIU installed on my layout, including the variable voltage channels functioning as fixed voltage channels. I also have 2 Z4000 transformers, one of which powers the 2 interconnected but electrically isolated main loops, and the other powers the 8 isolated sidings with heavy duty Atlas connectors.

I also have a Z500 brick hooked up as the auxiliary power source powering the TIU, and I have the Z4000 Receiver, which is not yet hooked up. I have Barry Broskowitzs book (3rd edition).

I am soon going to hook up the Receiver to have Z4K Tracks, and will strictly follow Barry's instructions for doing that.

When I hook up the Receiver and try to run a conventional Postwar engine on the Z4K Tracks for the 1st time using the DCS remote handheld, my fear is that if I do something wrong, the Postwar engine may fly off the layout and crash to the ground with the Z4000 set at 18 volts.

Is my fear unwarranted? What can be done to prevent my Postwar engine from becoming a runaway train?

Arnold

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First the Z4K tracks vary the transformer output. They start out at zero and you scroll up and down the voltage of the transformer. They can be set to go from zero to 18 volts with 1 click of the thumbwheel, but to run conventional, don't set them that way. To start out just use a caboose or other car with lights instead of an engine to to see if you can operate the transformer with the remote. Works like a charm.

I did have a problem with one engine years ago going over a Ross switch that would make a small spark causing the transformer to drop to zero. I just took a dremel and cut a very small piece out of the offending rail and all was good. The nice thing about the Z4K tracks is that you don't have to reset any thing. You just scroll the voltage back up to get your train going again.

Arnold,

If  you happen to have the original Z-4000 remote that came with the Z-4000 side receiver, you can use that without worrying about the engine taking off as it only works conventional engines.   I had the Z-4000 remote and receiver before DCS came out and it worked great  and I still use it to run conventional engines.  I found that if for some reason the E-STOP on the DCS remote doesn't resond, the Z-4000 E-STOP will drop the voltage on the transformer to zero and you don't have to reset anything.  Just roll up the voltage again when ready.                                                     

I believe if you follow Barry's recommendations, you should be fine. Just use the lighted car until you get familiar with working the DCS remote to make sure you don't have an engine take off fast.

@Joe Allen posted:

Arnold,

If  you happen to have the original Z-4000 remote that came with the Z-4000 side receiver, you can use that without worrying about the engine taking off as it only works conventional engines.   I had the Z-4000 remote and receiver before DCS came out and it worked great  and I still use it to run conventional engines.  I found that if for some reason the E-STOP on the DCS remote doesn't resond, the Z-4000 E-STOP will drop the voltage on the transformer to zero and you don't have to reset anything.  Just roll up the voltage again when ready.                                                     

I believe if you follow Barry's recommendations, you should be fine. Just use the lighted car until you get familiar with working the DCS remote to make sure you don't have an engine take off fast.

Good point, Joe. I do have the Z4000 remote as well as the receiver.

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