Skip to main content

Replies sorted oldest to newest

(n00b question.. Zebra Stripes?)

do you mean tape lines?  I was going to ask how one decides to re-paint or Re-store to original paint OR Paint to Weathered look. BUT I guess it is all about what YOU want it to look like. I thought I want my grandkids to enjoy our 1947 GG1 looking like new as they grow up. Maybe they don't care.

<salute>

Very nice. Must admit that I didn't have any issues running that 3rd Rail NYC J3a "Super Hudson" on our layout. Wonder what happened to it. Glad you got it "fixed" and enjoy it.

The late Gene Kutina (The Burlington Shops, in Chicago) had been doing all my weathering and custom detailing/painting since about 1973 (back when I was modeling in HO scale). He was an absolute expert in steam locomotive weathering, and since he had a massive library of prototype books to work from, plus adding my working knowledge of steam locomotives relative to "what gets dirty where and what color", Gene understood exactly what I wanted, and came through every time. One very special feature he developed for me, was the very unusual "flat black soot" on the top of the smokebox, so typical of virtually all NYC steam power, in the late 1940s thru the mid 1950s. Gene never would reveal/explain how he did that, only smiled when asked.

Last edited by Rich Melvin
@Hot Water posted:

Very nice. Must admit that I didn't have any issues running that 3rd Rail NYC J3a "Super Hudson" on our layout. Wonder what happened to it. Glad you got it "fixed" and enjoy it.

The late Gene Kutina (The Burlington Shops, in Chicago) had been doing all my weathering and custom detailing/painting since about 1973 (back when I was modeling in HO scale). He was an absolute expert in steam locomotive weathering, and since he had a massive library of prototype books to work from, plus adding my working knowledge of steam locomotives relative to "what gets dirty where and what color", Gene understood exactly what I wanted, and came through every time. One very special feature he developed for me, was the very unusual "flat black soot" on the top of the smokebox, so typical of virtually all NYC steam power, in the late 1940s thru the mid 1950s. Gene never would reveal/explain how he did that, only smiled when asked.

I have your SP Cab forward and your GN S-3. Gene did an excellent job on both. He also weathered a DM&IR for me a few years back. Sorry to hear he is no longer with us. I spent a half hour on the phone with him talking about the DM&IR. In the end I left it to his discretion and I wasn’t disappointed. Nice guy.

@Hot Water posted:

Another interesting, little known, fact about Gene's weathering skills was, the weathering looked ever-so-slightly different as the model was going away from you, then when the model was coming at you.

What with Gene's weathering treatments of the tops of smokeboxes and boilers, was another reason that I NEVER used smoke on any of my models!

Not to be irrelevant, @Hot Water, but I was trying to figure out if you were ever a TCA Member. You can enter my thread here - I've gathered a list of people who I believe were TCA members.

@Jeff78rr posted:

Muggy, no, the zebra stripes reference is to the inaccurate representation of soot coming down the sides of tenders, and locos in a grayish stripe.  That is so inaccurate and literally ruins the loco.

This is very accurate however, for a loco rusting away on static display in a park with pigeons on it .

There have been some very good examples of this type of weathering on the forum as well.

@NIKHIL posted:

Not to be irrelevant, @Hot Water, but I was trying to figure out if you were ever a TCA Member. You can enter my thread here - I've gathered a list of people who I believe were TCA members.

No, sorry I was never much into "toy trains", thus I never belonged to any such organizations. The only railroad oriented "organization" I ever belonged to was the Pacific Northwest Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society, back in the 1980s.

@Hot Water posted:

No, sorry I was never much into "toy trains", thus I never belonged to any such organizations. The only railroad oriented "organization" I ever belonged to was the Pacific Northwest Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society, back in the 1980s.

Sorry, @Hot Water, I remember that you had relationships with Lionel, MTH, and 3rd Rail, which you used to get correct sounds placed in your locomotives even when they were factory delivered with different sounds. So I was assuming you'd use York as your "medium" or source to do this.

Plus, you were one of the pioneers of the 3-rail scale movement, so I figured that since a lot of TCA members are 3-railers including some 3-rail scale, I thought you were a member as well.

Last edited by NIKHIL
@NIKHIL posted:

Sorry, @Hot Water, I remember that you had relationships with Lionel, MTH, and 3rd Rail, which you used to get correct sounds placed in your locomotives even when they were factory delivered with different sounds.

As a consultant, yes. From the early 1970s, I was always available to assist ANY model manufacturer, whether HO or O, with technical information, including drawings from the EMD Engineering Records (the EMD Public Relations Dept. was right across the hall from my office, in later years, and they would always be asking me to provide answers to this or that 'special request').

So I was assuming you'd use York as your "medium" or source to do this.

Nope. Never been to York!

@Strummer posted:

Gary

Very nice indeed. Questions:

What brand of track are you using? What are you using for ballast? Is that large 2-story station scratch built? About 9 minutes in, there is a large tree in view: did you make it yourself?

Thanks!

Mark in Oregon

Track is a combo.  Most Ross, some gargraves,  the straight away in front of the station is SuperO

The Station is MTH

Ballast is from Scenic express,  The trees are either Woodland or Scenic express.  I did not make them.

@Hot Water posted:

since about 1973 (back when I was modeling in HO scale).

Sorry to hijack this. Jack, do you remember an HO layout and maybe “club” in the EMD Lagrange plant? I went to an open house in the early 80’s and recall seeing an HO layout through a window. I always wondered how active they were? Was it open to anyone? Did guys work all day, then loiter around and run some trains before heading home? I don’t recall if it was a big layout, or maybe even just a display for HO EMD Models.



Sam,

Yes, was a member of the EMD Model RR Club (ELMOD Lines) from 1972 thru the end of the entire building & layout.

Sorry, but there was no "window" to view the EMD HO layout. During open houses, there was one door to let visitors in and an exit door at the other end of the layout.

We (the members, all 5 or 6 of us) met every Tuesday night and ran trains, or did maintenance. No one "loitered around", as we all went hope and returned about 7PM.

The layout was about 16 feet wide, and some 65 feet long. It was open at lunch time on Wednesdays for customers from the Service Dept. Training Center (which was just down the hallway), and I and an another member operated the layout for about 30 min., prior to the customers going on their scheduled plant tour.

Add Reply

Post
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×
×