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Hi folks,

Years ago, there was an outfit that converted postwar American Flyer S gauge GP7 locos to can motors. You had to send the whole chassis to them for the conversion.

I have a pair of 372 Union Pacific GP7 locos that could benefit from such a conversion.

Does that outfit still do these conversions and who are they? What is their contact information?

Thanks

Last edited by RoyBoy
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Can you just buy the parts needed for the coversion?

Jackie

No, you will need to send SnS the chassis. I have had a couple of gps converted to can motors, they will run great. You will after the conversion look at the idea of adding some weight to the locomotive, the can conversion will noticably reduce the traction on that power truck. One of my GPs was a T&P, it was not capable of pulling the second locomotive without adding weight.

Ray

@Rayin"S" posted:

No, you will need to send SnS the chassis. I have had a couple of gps converted to can motors, they will run great. You will after the conversion look at the idea of adding some weight to the locomotive, the can conversion will noticably reduce the traction on that power truck. One of my GPs was a T&P, it was not capable of pulling the second locomotive without adding weight.

Ray

They need the complete chassis as they need to do some milling to accept the new gear assembly. They also machine and fit new bushes for the axles as far as I remember. In many cases it would be pointless to convert to the SnS motor/gear assembly and still have worn out axle holes.

One of the benefits  in going this route is that it reduces considerably the current draw on the motor which therefore reduces the electric arcing which is the Achilles heel of worn out axle holes in the chassis.

The last time I checked the cost was over $100 for the conversion. Then add a solid state reverse unit and cost is $140. It is much easier to buy a later production can motor GP7 on the bay for $100-125 and just use the parts. You can just exchange the shell or transfer the power truck and reverse unit. The truck side frames are interchangeable. You can even sell what’s left as a dummy by removing the armature from the old power truck.

@Rogerdodger posted:

It is much easier to buy a later production can motor GP7 on the bay for $100-125 and just use the parts.

Lionel’s later GP chassis with can motors are flawed as well. At the time they advertised them with “wide axle bushings”. It wasn’t until I pulled one to pieces that I understood what they really meant.

The knurled axle has the same size journal’s each side of the knurl, unlike original Gilbert axles. This meant that the knurled part is a larger diameter than the axle journals, so in order to assemble it they had to have a bore in the oilite bearings large enough for it to pass through.

This means that the bearing is pretty well worn from new in the box. Another problem with these bearings is that they are not the full width available which is about 3.5mm, they are probably half this. In reality we have a bearing that is worn out already and too thin, so it isn’t any wonder that these also wear out prematurely.

UKAFLYER........ I solved this problem by installing the the bushing over the small side of the axle and pressing the bushing in.....then pressing the other bushing in place.....no drilling......

It would be great for someone to use a cottage industry setting and remake the lionel plactic motor mount and cover....Gears? 



Jackie

UKAFLYER........ I solved this problem by installing the the bushing over the small side of the axle and pressing the bushing in.....then pressing the other bushing in place.....no drilling......



Are you thinking of the early Gilbert chassis with early steel type bushings?


That should have been how Lionel did the job but they didn’t. I just machine out the Lionel chassis in full and install full width bearings.

Last edited by Ukaflyer

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