Something different'.. the artistic side of our modeling photography'... Many have photoshop and other programs. Many laptops and computers have built in creative photographic tools  and programs.  If you've been wanting to experiment with your camera and your PC, give it a try.  Lets have some fun!  No nitpicking here!  No prototype  correctness required'...CHROME f3DECO CHEVY

Please click on each photo for a better image'

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In the seventies and eighties this stuff was hot and you could not yet do it on a computer art directors would pay my day rate for me to go into the darkroom for the two or three days it took to make a complex posterization. They could be as many steps as you were willing to suffer through and the more steps the finer and lacier the effect.   Today I had this roughed out in about two minutes and tinkered with it for about thirty minutes.  The OGR forum site compressed it quite a bit so it looks flatter here than in my computer.  The original shot was made here in Birmingham in 1976.  One night about 10pm I heard a steam whistle off in the distance towards down town B'ham so I gathered up the wife and camera drove towards the sound.    Nikon Scan4 software though any software with a histogram will work.      j

103_7606_BLACKCOLOR1

 

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Having grown up using, viewing and processing B&W photography I find myself returning to that format. It is so easy to do with the click of a mouse :

       IMG_3636

Dad took the pic of the Santa Fe station at Grand Canyon, Az and I probably processed that enlargement. Nothing will ever replace the magic of watching an image form on a sheet of photo-paper soaking in the tray of Developer.

Lew

Lew

 

Operator of the Plywood Empire Route in the Beautiful Berkshires

Growing old is so much more fun than the only alternative.

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Oh yes! Kodachrome 64 ASA forever! I have my Dad's 35mm [mostly] Kodachrome slide collection. When he started it was ASA 10. You needed a bright day because unless you were wealthy your camera lens was small and thus not too great at gathering light. I know there are Kodachrome slides in there of Espee Daylights. One of these days I'll start going through them.

Lew

Lew

 

Operator of the Plywood Empire Route in the Beautiful Berkshires

Growing old is so much more fun than the only alternative.

geysergazer posted:

Oh yes! Kodachrome 64 ASA forever! I have my Dad's 35mm [mostly] Kodachrome slide collection. When he started it was ASA 10. You needed a bright day because unless you were wealthy your camera lens was small and thus not too great at gathering light. I know there are Kodachrome slides in there of Espee Daylights. One of these days I'll start going through them.

Lew

Hey Lew, do you remember the Kodak 620 camera with the fold out bellows?  I used to deliver news papers, age 12.  One my customers on my route gave me one as a tip.  It used a 8 picture gigantic roll of film.. a very low ASA.  But boy, it was a heck of a solid camera...  Wish I still had it'...

Image result for kodak 620 film camera  Image result for kodak 620 film camera Image result for kodak 620 film camera

I shot more movies than stills though I had a nice darkroom with a 4x5 enlarger. Also a Speed Graphic 4x5 camera. This was my movie camera. Bolex converted to double super 8. I had a Bolex anamorphic lens for shooting wide screen with matte box. Loved that camera. Wish I shot some trains with it. Dons-l640

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scale rail posted:

I shot more movies than stills though I had a nice darkroom with a 4x5 enlarger. Also a Speed Graphic 4x5 camera. This was my movie camera. Bolex converted to double super 8. I had a Bolex anamorphic lens for shooting wide screen with matte box. Loved that camera. Wish I shot some trains with it. Dons-l640

Luckily you had a great “Sound Man.”

Superintendent, Inland Valley Division, Brisbane & Bushong Railroad

Railway termini are our gates to the glorious and the unknown. Through them we pass out into adventure and sunshine, to them, alas! we return.
Edward M. Forster

Hi  Pennsylover, I am not using Photoshop. I am only using what came installed on my Laptop.  If you look at the top icons when you want to send an email, you'll see an Icon, Insert. Next to it  should say picture.  Click on that icon.  

Now your photo file will open.  Pick out a photo.  Click and will go into you blank email page.  Now look at the top and there should be icons to edit the photo you just placed in the email.  Click on those icons and menus will open, to change the photo's color, size, background, and all kinds of things....   Give it a try... Your computer may have different settings or names for the icons..  But they all do the same things...

Quarter Gauger 48 posted:
geysergazer posted:

Oh yes! Kodachrome 64 ASA forever! I have my Dad's 35mm [mostly] Kodachrome slide collection. When he started it was ASA 10. You needed a bright day because unless you were wealthy your camera lens was small and thus not too great at gathering light. I know there are Kodachrome slides in there of Espee Daylights. One of these days I'll start going through them.

Lew

Hey Lew, do you remember the Kodak 620 camera with the fold out bellows?  I used to deliver news papers, age 12.  One my customers on my route gave me one as a tip.  It used a 8 picture gigantic roll of film.. a very low ASA.  But boy, it was a heck of a solid camera...  Wish I still had it'...

Image result for kodak 620 film camera  Image result for kodak 620 film camera Image result for kodak 620 film camera

That was Dad's usual camera for many years (30s, before Kodachrome)! Then he bought a folding 35mm camera that had these weird film canisters. That was the camera he used for years of 35mm Kodachrome slide shooting. It became my first camera. I had to hand load film in reused cartridges because Kodak had long since dropped support for that product. That was OK because Dad was buying 35mm B&W film in bulk. You learned manual dexterity measuring, cutting and loading film in the dark. The old Kodak 620 camera became the core of his homemade enlarger. In later years he bought (used) a Beseler enlarger. 

Lew

Lew

 

Operator of the Plywood Empire Route in the Beautiful Berkshires

Growing old is so much more fun than the only alternative.

lew, it sure was a different world.  Just about everything required some manual dexterity.  I think this is the reason us "Baby Boomers" appreciate things and have sentimental values.  Something I don't see much of in today's times from the younger elements....

When I turned 13, my Dad saw I was using the old Kodak , but not getting great results. So for my birthday he bought me an Agfa Gevaert 35 MM rangefinder  camera from Germany.  I loved that camera even though it was a low end, it was cool and took decent pictures.  I've loved photography ever since'... and now days have a different camera for every occasion'...

 

 

 

 

 

No smoke and only mirrors.  I use mirrors to allow added depth to parts of my layout. IMG_6057IMG_6058

Cheers and Happy Railroading,

Patrick W  

CEO - The Free State Junction Railway 

" Where the music is sweet and the trains always run on time"

Home Office - Patsburg, Maryland 

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I enjoy taking photos at ground level allowing the photo to be viewed just as if one were standing there in person. IMG_4141IMG_4079IMG_4120IMG_4190IMG_5878IMG_5958

Cheers and Happy Railroading,

Patrick W  

CEO - The Free State Junction Railway 

" Where the music is sweet and the trains always run on time"

Home Office - Patsburg, Maryland 

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briansilvermustang posted:

 

 

          think I was seeing things this morning after that train ride last night...

 

 

 Wow Brian,  that is a very cool picture'.. Is that a photo shop configuration'?

Nice to see the thread getting some TRACTIVE  EFFORT'.. Thanks Brian and  Trumptrain for your terrific  photos'..

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