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machinist posted:
Mark Diff posted:

Machinist posted...That Menzie milk truck really brings back some bitter sweet memories for me. You see our family ran the "other" dairy in town and Menzie was the competition. 

Your trucks look great BTW.

Thanks Mark.   Well,  now you've got me.   Which dairy did your family operate?   By the time I was discharged from the USAF in mid 1971,  Menzie along with several other local dairies were out of business.

Nick

Nick, you might remember this one...IMG_0770

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Mark Diff posted:
machinist posted:
Mark Diff posted:

Machinist posted...That Menzie milk truck really brings back some bitter sweet memories for me. You see our family ran the "other" dairy in town and Menzie was the competition. 

Your trucks look great BTW.

Thanks Mark.   Well,  now you've got me.   Which dairy did your family operate?   By the time I was discharged from the USAF in mid 1971,  Menzie along with several other local dairies were out of business.

Nick

Nick, you might remember this one...IMG_0770

Mark,

I'm ashamed to admit it,   but I only vaguely remember that name.   I don't know anything about Royal-D Dairy or where it was located in Mckeesport.   Don't be too hard on me.

Nick

machinist posted:
Mark Diff posted:
machinist posted:
Mark Diff posted:

Machinist posted...That Menzie milk truck really brings back some bitter sweet memories for me. You see our family ran the "other" dairy in town and Menzie was the competition. 

Your trucks look great BTW.

Thanks Mark.   Well,  now you've got me.   Which dairy did your family operate?   By the time I was discharged from the USAF in mid 1971,  Menzie along with several other local dairies were out of business.

Nick

Nick, you might remember this one...IMG_0770

Mark,

I'm ashamed to admit it,   but I only vaguely remember that name.   I don't know anything about Royal-D Dairy or where it was located in Mckeesport.   Don't be too hard on me.

Nick

Not really surprised, the family business was small in comparison to Menzie. Ironically the two dairies were located about 3 blocks apart on Riverview ave.

NHVRYGray posted:

1995 reissue of the 50's 1/48 Revell Kenworth.  Don Mills Alcoa wheels on the tractor significantly improved the looks over the kits wheels.  

Birch plywood floor added to the trailer.  Tarped load salvaged of a Lionel Flatcar, and it scales out to about 13-3 so i'm still legal.

Nice looking KW Dons  components sure make a difference 

Some of you may know Ken Briers. He is a former GG1 driver who has fully restored a 1949 Ford PRR Truck.  He did painstaking research to make sure he got the truck right.   The bed is full of all that documentation.  Ken regularly drives it to PRR events.  You can find many photos of his truck on the web but here is one he sent me:

3584 color

 Ken is a friend, so I built two models of his truck.  I gave him one, the other is on my layout:

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The color is actually quite close to that of the real truck.

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 I can't recall whose model pickup that is, but it required some customization to look like Ken's. And of course, all the decals, including the Natty Boh sticker on the bumper, are all custom made. 

I have another friend named Ray who owns a 1956 Willys flat bed pickup truck.  He sent me photos (he lives in New Mexico). 

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I started with this:

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And ended with this

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Last edited by John Sethian
John Sethian posted:

Some of you may know Ken Briers. He is a former GG1 driver who has fully restored a 1949 Ford PRR Truck.  He did painstaking research to make sure he got the truck right.   The bed is full of all that documentation.  Ken regularly drives it to PRR events.  You can find many photos of his truck on the web but here is one he sent me:

3584 color

 Ken is a friend, so I built two models of his truck.  I gave him one, the other is on my layout:

3672

3670

The color is actually quite close to that of the real truck.

=snip=

Wow, John.  You do amazing work.  I'm especially taken with the PRR Ford.  The details like the black rubber seal around the windows are great.  Looking at the 1:1 restoration, it's interesting how the company marked the truck with weight and size/pressure? metrics for use and maintenance -- almost as thought it was a rail car or engine.  Maybe that's why it was the "Standard of the World" :-).  Those lights (?) on the fenders are something I've not seen on those particular Fords.

TRRR

TomlinsonRunRR posted:
John Sethian posted:

Some of you may know Ken Briers. He is a former GG1 driver who has fully restored a 1949 Ford PRR Truck.  He did painstaking research to make sure he got the truck right.   The bed is full of all that documentation.  Ken regularly drives it to PRR events.  You can find many photos of his truck on the web but here is one he sent me:

3584 color

 Ken is a friend, so I built two models of his truck.  I gave him one, the other is on my layout:

3672

3670

The color is actually quite close to that of the real truck.

=snip=

Wow, John.  You do amazing work.  I'm especially taken with the PRR Ford.  The details like the black rubber seal around the windows are great.  Looking at the 1:1 restoration, it's interesting how the company marked the truck with weight and size/pressure? metrics for use and maintenance -- almost as thought it was a rail car or engine.  Maybe that's why it was the "Standard of the World" :-).  Those lights (?) on the fenders are something I've not seen on those particular Fords.

TRRR

John that Ford is beautiful!Thanks for posting.  Where can I get a couple sets of the door decals I’ve got a couple Mack’s I would like to make.

Thanks guys

TRRR:  You get the observant award for the week.  That window gasketing took a fairly steady hand.  There are lots of other details that (like the rear bumper) that I had to contend with. As for those fender mounted lights..I decided to skip them.  I went through a similar exercise with some REA trucks:

1310

 

And realized I didn't want to go through that again. Getting the holes straight and identical on both fenders was very time consuming.  Even if you are off by .010", the difference between the two is noticeable by eye. And that was after I built styrene templates and used a drill press.  

Lee: Sorry but those were custom made one off sets.  I drew all the artwork, and because the decal supplier I was working with (they are now out of business) could not do multi color decals on that small a scale, the black and gold are two different decals, which are overlaid.  So the PRR in the center of the keystone is a separate decal. I can send you a file of the blown up artwork, but you'd be on your own reducing it to the right size and getting the decals made.  Contact me off line 

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Stephen

Sorry about the tardy reply. That probably was Ken's truck you saw. I know he has had it there in the past.  If it looked exactly like that, it was his, as by Ken's own admission he took some liberties with the door artwork (he changed fonts and sizes in Choptank because he thought it looked better), and he added the "blow two shorts to pass" on the rear bumper.   He reports many people honk when they go by.  

However the biggest single identifier for Ken's truck is the "Natty Boh" sticker on the rear bumper. 

 

 

Last edited by John Sethian

imageimageimageimageContext:

I've been fascinated with this thread so I decided to contribute my efforts to recreate a warehouse on my Midland Division of the New Haven RR at the time of the PC merger.  The railroad occupies about 1800 sq ft and operates with full waybills, interchanging with the B&M, B&A, NYC and CV northbound;  south and west with the PRR and others through Greenville car floats and Maybrook.

G Fox was a major retailer of the period, having a flagship store in Hartford Ct rivaling Filene's, Macy's, etc.   Their delivery trucks were ubiquitous!

The box truck is based on an Athearn Ford tractor with the fifth wheel removed and the chassis built from styrene. The box body was "kit bashed" from an old Lionel pup trailer, cur and fitted with a new styrene front.   Decals were custom made using logos from online sources.  Any suggestions from truck model era would be welcome!

 

 

 

 

 

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 Patrick: very nice. Like those newray cattle trailer. My dad pulled that  exact type trailer in the 1960s I think it was a Keystone Trailer that made that type. Like that milk truck also. I was wondering if you were going to post the derailment here thanks for posting

Bob: that’s awesome! More the merrier you did a great job 

Don: I’m glad you decided to post here I’m liking that C Ford nice small fleet you got going on feel free to post here anytime.

Trussman: thanks for posting your autos look great. I like that ford boom truck and the bus. 

Ed: that ford looks very clean I like the colors and setting nicely done. 

Thanks to all you that have posted likes here and supporting each other and sharing thought and ideas. Let’s not stop this keep those pics posting. Thanks again. Lee D.

Here is my favorite model of all (so far anyway).  I picked it up some weeks back when I visited a Shaw's supermarket in Maine.  It happened to be my birthday, and there was a revolving sales rack of die-cast 1:43 models calling my name. 

This 2014 Chevy Silverado has fantastic detailing and perfect proportions.  I really like how the metallic paint was down-sized for the model.  (That's not dust in the photos below, it's scale metallic paint! :-).  This 4x4 is definitely one of Kinsmart's more elegant attempts.  It cost the usual $5.99.  Doors and tailgate open.

The only customizations that I envision on this otherwise perfect model might be to add a little bit of dilute black to the running board treads to tone down the "chrome" a bit and that lovely windshield could use an inspection sticker -- assuming that I can add one without making a mess (highly doubtful).

Tomlinson Run Railroad

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imageimageimageimageimagewell, another week of inspiration led me to yet another vehicle for my layout.  The coal truck you see is based on a '37 Ford tractor with the fifth wheel ground down to the appropriate level in order to accommodate a Berkshire Valley dump body.

I'm stumped by the need to add the scissor lift common on coal delivery trucks.  Has anyone  attempted that part of the vehicle?  

 

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TomlinsonRunRR posted:

Here is my favorite model of all (so far anyway).  I picked it up some weeks back when I visited a Shaw's supermarket in Maine.  It happened to be my birthday, and there was a revolving sales rack of die-cast 1:43 models calling my name. 

This 2014 Chevy Silverado has fantastic detailing and perfect proportions.  I really like how the metallic paint was down-sized for the model.  (That's not dust in the photos below, it's scale metallic paint! :-).  This 4x4 is definitely one of Kinsmart's more elegant attempts.  It cost the usual $5.99.  Doors and tailgate open.

The only customizations that I envision on this otherwise perfect model might be to add a little bit of dilute black to the running board treads to tone down the "chrome" a bit and that lovely windshield could use an inspection sticker -- assuming that I can add one without making a mess (highly doubtful).

Tomlinson Run Railroad

That is on sharp Silverado!

Stock Lionel Peterbilts from the mid 1970s Trains and Truckin set with stock Weaver trailers.  Tractors were originally molded in all one color with hideous pad printed logos.

New paint job with detailed grills, markers, bumper and painted stacks tanks and wheels.  They still may not be silk, but definitely better than a sows ear.

As a question, has anyone ever attempted to get the wheels off the axles?  I'm afraid I'd break them if I pulled and twisted any harder.

What is the lineage of the current Lionel trailer and Ford tractor?  Weaver and First Gear??

Gray Lackey

 

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