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And try, try again.

I have just attempted a scenery project that was an utter failure, IMO.

As I mentioned on another recent thread, I had new pipes installed in my basement that stick out like a sore, rather white, thumb above a corner of my layout. Here they are:

20210724_112747

One of our very creative Forum members suggested that I make clouds to hide or blend in with the white pipes.

This morning I got what I thought was a great idea to make the clouds: use crumpled up, white tissue paper and glue it to the pipes.

Are you ready for a laugh?

Take a look at this:

20210725_104334

20210725_104344

That tissue paper is now in the garbage.

I share this for 2 reasons: 1) to show that scenery is a process and initial attempts, at least for me, often fail, and 2) to get some of your ideas on how to create better clouds.

I have no idea, at this point, whether I will be able to make clouds to hide the pipes such that they are acceptable to me, but I have initially failed before at scenery projects and ultimately been satisfied with them, which makes their success even sweeter.

What do you think? Any suggestions on how to make clouds that will cover up the pipes?

Arnold

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@Craftech posted:

Black ABS would have looked better.  You could paint the white ones black or buy black ones and replace those.  Just make sure no on flushes while you are doing it.

John

Unfortunately, ABS pipe does not meet code in NY.

Arnold- the clouds need to be applied to the pipe, not wrapped around them. Try polyester batting for pillows. It can be shaped as desired and applied in layers. You may want to add support between the two vertical lines to increase the "cloud cover" as well.

You could paint it black as John suggested. It would not stand out as much at least.

I will give you credit for sharing your adventures with us.

Bob

And try, try again.

I have just attempted a scenery project that was an utter failure, IMO.

As I mentioned on another recent thread, I had new pipes installed in my basement that stick out like a sore, rather white, thumb above a corner of my layout. Here they are:

20210724_112747




Arnold

Another idea..... Since Yankee stadium is nearby...How about adding a couple of building flats to hide the pipes with a tunnel below for the trains to go through. The Cross Bronx under the apartments comes to mind.

Arnold,

I could see a wall of building facades over the front of the pipes that you can remove a street in the foreground and then a park to mimic the feel of central park.  You do scenes with people so well, it would make that corner pretty interesting.

For me, I literally go back to the drawing board frequently.  My challenge is though until I get into my next home, it will stay just that.  On the drawing board.

Sometimes the drawing board is digital as in the case of this drawing for 3rd Rail FL9s from 2012

FL9_NH

Sometimes it is the doodle while doing something else.  In this case it was designing a modular layout while in child birth classes prior to my youngest being born.  She'll be 12 in a month.  You can see that I was paying attention with the notes in the upper right corner.

Module

Finally, at other times, it's more planned out like this 16'x8' layout I took some time planning when I was in the N scale world.  This one may still be on the table so to speak.

Layout

What I have found overall is that it is the challenges, such as the pipes in your case, that provide us the opportunity to be at our most creative.  Who knows?  Those pipes could also be the beginnings of a steel mill or some industrial plant and be integral to the design of your layout.  Whatever you figure out, I know your creativity knows no bounds.

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@RSJB18 posted:

Unfortunately, ABS pipe does not meet code in NY.

Arnold- the clouds need to be applied to the pipe, not wrapped around them. Try polyester batting for pillows. It can be shaped as desired and applied in layers. You may want to add support between the two vertical lines to increase the "cloud cover" as well.

You could paint it black as John suggested. It would not stand out as much at least.

I will give you credit for sharing your adventures with us.

Bob

Bob,

Can you show me code regarding the ABS pipe?  This is what I turned up:

https://up.codes/viewer/new_yo...itary-drainage#702.1



In terms of the other suggestions, you don't want to draw attention TO it.  You want people to ignore it.  Thus the black color.

John

Last edited by Craftech
@Craftech posted:

Bob,

Can you show me code regarding the ABS pipe?  This is what I turned up:

https://up.codes/viewer/new_yo...itary-drainage#702.1



In terms of the other suggestions, you don't want to draw attention TO it.  You want people to ignore it.  Thus the black color.

John

I stand corrected. I'm also shocked that it's allowed in the NYC code. The City was always more strict than national codes.

Arnold;

One more possibility. Since your scene appears to be in the Bronx (based on a nearby item whose name I will NOT say ), how about a Bronx staple - a section of elevated highway??? There are downward slopes near each end which could be covered by some concrete abutments, and the roadway could run across the horizontal pipe. It you construct it as a one piece flat that is somehow attached to the pipe, it would be fairly easy to remove if needed.

You need a curved backdrop in the corner - in front of the pipes.

1) Remove the backdrop from the wall and remove the buildings just behind the track.

2) Get large, tall piece(s) of white oaktag.

3) Bend the oaktag to the outside curve of the track ties.

4) Secure oaktag at the bottom and perhaps to the pipe, leaving clearance between the oaktag and the curved track. You may need some reinforcement behind the oaktag.

5) Mount the backdrop on the curved surface of the oaktag.

MELGAR

Last edited by MELGAR
@Apples55 posted:

Arnold;

One more possibility. Since your scene appears to be in the Bronx (based on a nearby item whose name I will NOT say ), how about a Bronx staple - a section of elevated highway??? There are downward slopes near each end which could be covered by some concrete abutments, and the roadway could run across the horizontal pipe. It you construct it as a one piece flat that is somehow attached to the pipe, it would be fairly easy to remove if needed.

Another great idea. Thanks Paul.

@MELGAR posted:

You need a curved backdrop in the corner - in front of the pipes.

1) Remove the backdrop from the wall and remove the buildings just behind the track.

2) Get large, tall piece(s) of white oaktag.

3) Bend the oaktag to the outside curve of the track ties.

4) Secure oaktag at the bottom and perhaps to the pipe, leaving clearance between the oaktag and the curved track. You may need some reinforcement behind the oaktag.

5) Mount the backdrop on the curved surface of the oaktag.

MELGAR

Brilliant, as usual, Melgar!

Arnold,

Cutting and re-routing plastic pipe is not hard, and plumbers do it all of the time.  I would have the U-Shaped "Trap" on the left side cut and moved up about 6 inches, and rotated back 90 degrees so that it runs flat against the side wall of your layout, running away from the center of the layout, and have a new Y entry connector installed (into the downward septic line   on the right) with the new Y also rotated backwards 90 degrees away from your layout, so that the horizontal connecting pipe that runs between the drain on the left and the septic line on the right could be run flat against the back wall.

When folks build out, or remodel basements, this type of work is pretty routine, especially when the are building in a new bathroom, with drains and toilet fixtures.  (Not rocket science.)

Probably the only complication for this, that as I understand it, you live in either New York or perhaps in New Jersey, where work like this would cost a bundle, require a Union man, and probably require a building permit.

In many other parts of the country, a Master Plumber would be able to just show up, do the work in about three hours, charge $250 to $450, and leave.  (Where I live, Master Plumbers only charge $85 to $100 per hour. )

As far as just making what you have into scenery,  if I were doing clouds, I would try to use large bundles or gobs of processed cotton  (i.e., the stuff that cotton balls are made from.)   You may be able to find that on the Internet, since some people actually have a hobby of spinning it into thread on Spinning Wheels.

Or, crazy thought, but the "structure" of your plastic pipes looks somewhat like a bridge.  Maybe there is a way to do a flat of the Brooklyn Bridge, with a "misty" finish, and glue it to the pipes.

Mannyrock

@Mannyrock posted:

Arnold,

Cutting and re-routing plastic pipe is not hard, and plumbers do it all of the time.  I would have the U-Shaped "Trap" on the left side cut and moved up about 6 inches, and rotated back 90 degrees so that it runs flat against the side wall of your layout, running away from the center of the layout, and have a new Y entry connector installed (into the downward septic line   on the right) with the new Y also rotated backwards 90 degrees away from your layout, so that the horizontal connecting pipe that runs between the drain on the left and the septic line on the right could be run flat against the back wall.

When folks build out, or remodel basements, this type of work is pretty routine, especially when the are building in a new bathroom, with drains and toilet fixtures.  (Not rocket science.)

Probably the only complication for this, that as I understand it, you live in either New York or perhaps in New Jersey, where work like this would cost a bundle, require a Union man, and probably require a building permit.

In many other parts of the country, a Master Plumber would be able to just show up, do the work in about three hours, charge $250 to $450, and leave.  (Where I live, Master Plumbers only charge $85 to $100 per hour. )

As far as just making what you have into scenery,  if I were doing clouds, I would try to use large bundles or gobs of processed cotton  (i.e., the stuff that cotton balls are made from.)   You may be able to find that on the Internet, since some people actually have a hobby of spinning it into thread on Spinning Wheels.

Or, crazy thought, but the "structure" of your plastic pipes looks somewhat like a bridge.  Maybe there is a way to do a flat of the Brooklyn Bridge, with a "misty" finish, and glue it to the pipes.

Mannyrock

Yet another great idea, thanks Mannyrock.

Arnold - I like the two suggestions - paint the pipes the same color blue that you have in the back right of the picture.  The other would be to have thin flat panel in front of the pipes - or I suppose you could do a scrim that would hang down from the ceiling that would hide the pipes.  From the picture, I can't quite tell whether your tracks run directly below the pipe...?  OTOH, it is a chance to make lemonade.  I like the suggestion of labeling it the Flushing line - or alternatively, you could claim its a model of Elon Musk's hyperloop.

@richs09 posted:

Arnold - I like the two suggestions - paint the pipes the same color blue that you have in the back right of the picture.  The other would be to have thin flat panel in front of the pipes - or I suppose you could do a scrim that would hang down from the ceiling that would hide the pipes.  From the picture, I can't quite tell whether your tracks run directly below the pipe...?  OTOH, it is a chance to make lemonade.  I like the suggestion of labeling it the Flushing line - or alternatively, you could claim its a model of Elon Musk's hyperloop.

Rich, thanks for your input.

The track does not run directly below the pipe. The pipe does cross the track but there is more than 6 inches of clearance, so the train can safely go under the pipe.

Arnold there are many great ideas to hide the pipes with structures here.  If you would rather pursue the sky alternative Michaels carries a roll of paper with a cloudy design on it.  you could wrap the pipe with it and it may blend into the sky back drop.  I did it once with wall paper in our laundry room.  A vent pipe ran across the wall then up through a cabinet and through the ceiling.  Wrapping it so that the pattern matched the wall paper above and below the horizontal or on either side of verticals was a lot of work but it blended nicely.  Elbows are tough, especillay with a pattern.  Michaels also has a roll of sky blue if you don't like the cloud pattern.

For an inexpensive solution, get a piece of flat corrugated cardboard large enough to just cover the pipes, but not touch the layout, and cut to size. Paint it sky blue and let dry.

Obtain and use the stencil technique shown in the below link to paint some clouds. Glue/staple the finished cardboard to a thin  piece of wood trim (1" wide by 1/8" thick) across the top backside of the cardboard and attach a couple of screw eyes to the wood.

The Token Three Railer: Background Cloud Painting: Project by CSX Al (token3rail.blogspot.com)

Hang from the ceiling with black thread so the finished cardboard covers the piping.

Last edited by Richie C.

Many good ideas above, and some very entertaining ones.  My 2 cents...

Although future work due to leaks is unlikely with properly-installed PVC, remember to account for that possibility with whatever you choose to do.  Personally, I like to leave my plumbing visible so that problems can be caught sooner rather than later.

It's likely that almost anything you do will look like an afterthought (which it is!) - why not just leave it alone?  After awhile, it will become invisible to you.  And if a visitor points it out, just say "this is what happens when you build a layout in a basement".  And if they're critical, show them the door.

@coach joe posted:

Arnold if you go the building flat route to hide the pipes then it would have to be a picture of the Bronx County Courthouse on some poster board.  An imposing edifice perched above The Stadium up on the Grand Concourse.

I love your idea, Joe. Now, pulling that off, having an image of the Bronx County Courthouse covering up the pipes, that's another matter.

At the moment, unless one of the backdrop outfits makes such an image, or unless the hobbyist has the artistic skill to paint such an image, it's hard for me to believe it can be done.

I very much doubt that I have the artistic or modeling skills to do it, and I don't have deep pockets to pay someone what they deserve to receive, to do it.

But, you never know. I might take a stab at it down the road (tracks).

Arnold, this is what I would do - https://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/...oject-factory-bridge





The PVC pipe crossing the tracks is covered in a factory bridge, which connects a building flat against the wall to a second story add on of the building behind the loading dock on the other side.

Geez, Strap Hanger, I love your idea too, and I think your idea might be easier for such a mediocre modeler like me to pull off.

@Mallard4468 posted:

Many good ideas above, and some very entertaining ones.  My 2 cents...

Although future work due to leaks is unlikely with properly-installed PVC, remember to account for that possibility with whatever you choose to do.  Personally, I like to leave my plumbing visible so that problems can be caught sooner rather than later.

It's likely that almost anything you do will look like an afterthought (which it is!) - why not just leave it alone?  After awhile, it will become invisible to you.  And if a visitor points it out, just say "this is what happens when you build a layout in a basement".  And if they're critical, show them the door.

That's a great attitude to have, Mallard4468

In fact, I did just what you say regarding other pipes (hot water baseboard pipes) in front of the same train table where my Polo Grounds is currently located:

IMG_0835

I simply park oil tankers on the siding, so the pipes kinda work in the industrial scene with the oil tankers.

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