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I built the "general store" kit a couple of years ago.  These kits are craftsman level kits and truth be told, I found scratch building to be easier.  The instructions in my kit were all written out, meaning no pictures other than plan and elevation drawings.  You start out by cutting out all the paper templates, then taping those to cardstock and cutting that out too.  Then you laminate the cardstock to the actual wooden exterior and finally cut out windows/doors etc.  I remember in this kit that the position indicated for a window on the back wall was reversed on the cardstock versus where it was supposed to be according to the elevation drawings.  Be careful!  If I remember correctly, there were over 100 steps to complete the kit, not including painting, weathering, etc.  The kit really turned out nice, but it was a major effort - not for the faint of heart.

I built the "Village Grocery" kit.  I simplified it by omitting the double wall, (interior wall), construction and braced it with strip wood instead, which I think sped up construction.  (I don't do interiors..if you want interiors, those walls should stay) I kitbashed it considerably by making part of the front driveunder for gas pumps, and then extended and modified the rear of the building to allow for lost space. They have another building I'd like to build, but would kitbash that one severely, also.

If you have built other craftsman kits, I would suspect you can handle it...it is beyond Plasticville, though.

I built the woodan Sash company a year or two ago, after a couple scratch builds I am currently working on the Linolium factory. 

 

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 Plan on 80-120 hrs depending on how and if you do the insides on the bigger kits,at least thats what i figure.

 I only have good things to say about them. You have to finish the interiors with your own ideas and supplies but still nice kits. 

If you have chance to talk to who your ordering from try to get the kits with the lighter cardstock. The green card stock although very heavy , really took a toll on my exacto blade stash and my fingers.

 

The newer kit has lighter cardstock and alot more pleasant to work with.

If you end up buying one your welcome to email me. I could probubly help a little in the way the instructions are laid out.

 

Hope you didnt mind I showed  some  pics , i was really proud of this one, came out nice for a beginner .LOL

 

 

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Last edited by Patrick H
Originally Posted by prrhorseshoecurve:

Really nice Patrick...

 

but that chimney... did it come like this with the kit or is this your concoction?

 

That is the look of a Chimney that was extended upward due to smoke going somewhere is was unwanted, TWICE! Very prototypical in built up over time areas.

Originally Posted by modelmaker#1:

A box of cardboard and paper templates. You cut it all out with knife.

Not much fun.

Guys just trying to make a living like the rest of us....You make some nice stuff also..

 

heres some more box of cardboard  cut up....one of the nicest buildings  Ive  seen in a while, taught me alot about scratch building.....

 

 

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Last edited by Patrick H
Originally Posted by Avanti:
Originally Posted by modelmaker#1:

A box of cardboard and paper templates. You cut it all out with knife.

Not much fun.

Sounds awful. The only thing worse would be scratch building. 

Scratch building is "worse"????

 

Wholly Mackinaw!....and I've always had the MOST fun when scratch building!!

Creating something unique, working from photos...or, as the Disney folks call it: Imagineering!...gives this old phart the most rewarding construction project of all!

 

Re cardboard?....If you have some old, old model railroad magazines....we're talking 1930's-1950's...you should see some of the things people made using 'cardboard'.  Anyone remember Jack Work, model builder?  He was well published in Model Railroader.  His project medium-of-choice?...Strathmore board...fancy 'cardboard'.  Kalmbach had a project book about 40+ years ago....a collection of 'dollar projects'...things you could make for the layout using inexpensive, commonly available materials...like cardboard.  Easy, fun, never-ending supply of free material. 

 

One of our (LHS) associates has us save all single ply cardstock for her building needs.  For our store G scale layout I built an octagonal gateman's house from an old magazine article/plan using cardboard 100% throughout.  (Strictly an indoor structure, though, for sure.)   Scratch built.  Loved every minute of the project.

 

But, TEHO.

 

KD

 

 

 

 

 

 

Originally Posted by dkdkrd:
Originally Posted by Avanti:
Originally Posted by modelmaker#1:

A box of cardboard and paper templates. You cut it all out with knife.

Not much fun.

Sounds awful. The only thing worse would be scratch building. 

Scratch building is "worse"????

 

Wholly Mackinaw!....and I've always had the MOST fun when scratch building!!

Did I pick the wrong emoticon?   That was supposed to be sarcasm.

 

Originally Posted by dkdkrd:
Originally Posted by Avanti:
Originally Posted by modelmaker#1:

A box of cardboard and paper templates. You cut it all out with knife.

Not much fun.

Sounds awful. The only thing worse would be scratch building. 

Scratch building is "worse"????

 

Wholly Mackinaw!....and I've always had the MOST fun when scratch building!!

Creating something unique, working from photos...or, as the Disney folks call it: Imagineering!...gives this old phart the most rewarding construction project of all!

 

Re cardboard?....If you have some old, old model railroad magazines....we're talking 1930's-1950's...you should see some of the things people made using 'cardboard'.  Anyone remember Jack Work, model builder?  He was well published in Model Railroader.  His project medium-of-choice?...Strathmore board...fancy 'cardboard'.  Kalmbach had a project book about 40+ years ago....a collection of 'dollar projects'...things you could make for the layout using inexpensive, commonly available materials...like cardboard.  Easy, fun, never-ending supply of free material. 

 

One of our (LHS) associates has us save all single ply cardstock for her building needs.  For our store G scale layout I built an octagonal gateman's house from an old magazine article/plan using cardboard 100% throughout.  (Strictly an indoor structure, though, for sure.)   Scratch built.  Loved every minute of the project.

 

But, TEHO.

 

KD

 

 

 

 I absolutely remember Jack Work and many of the other scratch builders that have faded from memory. But these gentlemen never looked for kits to build something they needed, they simply gathered up materials from where ever and built everything from scratch. They are my heroes and I will build a kit only as a last resort or if it was a gift from a loved one...

 

Avanti...I know you prefer scratch building and yes you picked the wrong emoticon...but it was good for a laugh....

 

Bob

 

 

 

I built "Tudlow's Confectionary" 7 years ago. 

 

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It has a store interior that I scratch-built using traditional methods and the computer.

 

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Steam Era Structures make interesting and unusual O'scale craftsman kits. I'm probably going to get more. That being said, it was a difficult kit to build. This was pre-laser-cut. It had milled basswood exteriors and then backed up with thick cardstock. All edges, shapes and window holes had to be laid out and cut by hand. The end result was a nice late 1800s commercial building that I'm glad I built.

 

The roof was complete with Chimneys (2), small smoke jacks, vent stacks and down spouts. Grandt Line windows, doors and store fronts were included as well as nice corbel details under the front eaves.

 

Compared to others, these kits aren't for the faint-hearted. Bar Mills and their ilk go together much easier.

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I did get my sticky paws on that other kit of his.  I think from when he was selling

these on eBay, that he said he was not going to be producing them any longer. So

maybe you better grab the ones you fancy.

I have the feed mill and it will be converted into a grain elevator with tall towers...

maybe wooden contemporary to the structure, or later concrete or metal ones.  I

do have a fetish about grain elevators.

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