2235w tender question.

I posted this question on the Hi-Rail/Traditional forum with no luck, so let me ask it in a different way here, as the tender does have a clam shell coupler! The shell on this 2235 is stamped 2224. The shells (to me) look very similar, but I’ve only seen a picture of the 2224. In this case, was it common for Lionel to interchange shells on different chassis’s?

How would I go about repairing a missing coupler hook on the tender’s rear coupler? My guess is I’d have to purchase a doner coupler, then try to remove the hook and install it on the tender coupler. Is there a replacement coupler or other way to go about this? I’m just not sure I will have any luck securely fastening the hook which looks force fitted.

Thanks...Rich

Original Post

You can replace just the barb, they are available. I have some your or your local parts dealer can get them. There is a special anvil available to hold the barb while installing. Then use a small chisel to install. Or if you have a high watt soldering gun. they can be soldered underside.

Two versions of each 2224 and 2235 tenders. Diecast and plastic. Diecast is longer. Diecast will have the 2224 raised number inside on casting. Short plastic one should have 1666 i think. The frames were stamped 2224 for 224E’s and 2235 for the 225e’s.  And there was a high coupler 2245w which used the same diecast shell and long frame again. 1939 for that 2245 tender.

Dennis Holler If its old and broke, I like it

The shell on this 2235 is stamped 2224.

Stamped, or is the number cast on the inside of the shell?

It' been awhile. As I recall, the 225E loco has a post inside the floor of the cab. The tender has a long draw bar with a hole in the end that fits over the post to connect the engine and tender.
The 224E loco has a draw bar with the end bent down, and may have a ears making it look like a "T".
The matching tender has a shorter draw bar with a slot.

I think the metal tender shells are the same.

Someone else should verify what I have written.

C.W. Burfle

Thanks everyone for that information, big help!

C.W., the shell number 2224 is in cast.

I’m not having much luck finding a complete truck with roller anywhere. Looks like the box is force fitted, I’d probably end up breaking it trying to remove.

Chuck, if I can’t find a complete truck I will email you. I’ll probably attach with a dab of JB weld. You’ve helped me out before with some Flyer parts.

Off topic, but are the cast 225E and 1666 prewar engines considered “Tinplate”. I know they pulled tinplate cars.

Thanks...Rich

 

Dennis Holler posted:

Probably easier to swap the truck. The hooks are a pain, you really need the cover or hood off to properly stake the hook. You could also use some jb weld or epoxy sparingly.

I have replaced missing hooks many times and prefer the hood there. I use a little super glue in the hole and on the hook and hold in place about a minute. I use the hood to hold it in place

Bill

What's funny is that it seems like a lot of times I find em with a good barb hook but a broken hood.  Either that or like the OP found with a good hood and missing barb...

I'm pretty sure that anvil Chuck mentioned is still available  from the parts sources or a guy could probably make one.

Dennis Holler If its old and broke, I like it

Rich the 224E and the 1666 are considered prewar ( depending which you get ) there die-cast but where built for pre-war. The 224 ( without the E is postwar. )( there is some other differences also like the legnth of the hook)  Not sure off hand how to tell the difference on a pre-war or post-war 1666

Bill

I’m not having much luck finding a complete truck with roller anywhere. Looks like the box is force fitted, I’d probably end up breaking it trying to remove.

In my experience, as long as the mating car has it's barb, you can get away without it.

C.W. Burfle

Agreed with all the above, although they both lost the E at some point prior to the end of the prewar period.  The round cab floor is a much better determining factor.  One exception to the cab floor is the 1945 only 224E with straight cab floor, and black handrails.  It also had a unique (to it) drawbar and the matching unique 2466W tender had no drawbar.  The engine bar fit into a larger oval hole in the tender floor.  Both only used for the 1945 463W set.  This is the set with the early wirley or dished flying shoe coupler trucks.  Maybe the question on 1666's is whether they stopped using the number plates and went to stamping before or after the war..

 I have several late 229's and 1664's that were silver rubber stamped where the number plate would go and I think this is pretty well documented as well.  Like always, good rules of thumb but as usual there are exceptions and special cases to learn about.

Dennis Holler If its old and broke, I like it

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