TomlinsonRunRR posted:

Well, as my following photos show, I just had to have a Swiffer (in a snow storm, no less) and the only place that had them was my local Market Basket supermarket.  So, in spite of Mooner's sage advice, I came home with a 1:50 delivery truck just like his.

This New England company survived a well-publicized ownership battle between first cousins, both named Arthur.  I went to elementary school with them both.  The employees went on strike to support the Artie who got forced out and he ultimately prevailed.  Legend has it that Harvard Business School teaches this story as an example of how to manage and not how to manage.  So, you see, I had to have this truck.   It looks really great in my kitchen while the floor layout is packed away.

This shot shows some of the minor customizations I made: I painted the vents, the grab handles, the hood latches, added a bit of soot to the exhaust stack, and -- my favorite part -- I added orange reflectors to the side mirrors.

Photos on the web confirmed that this Mack is based on the MHD (medium heavy duty) Granite.  Note the hooks in the front and the grille guard.  Possible years seem to be 2013-18.  The fenders should have a bit of grey.

For chuckles I wound some 22-gauge wire around a pen refill to simulate air lines.  It was the thinnest red wire I had handy.  This was just a proof-of-concept; at some point I will get scale blue, red, and green wire and do it right.  Notice also the movable landing gear:

Another plus is the opening rear doors.  Here's Chef Chuck Wagon and a boy named Sous Chef looking over a shipment of produce.  The primer grey color indicates that it was delivered during the employee strike. Chef is not happy:

In this closeup shot (under a sun lamp and with full flash), you can see that the paint I used didn't take well to the model's matte finish paint.  As a result for the latch on this side, I tried a Sharpie marker.  Do any of you have suggestions for correcting this paint problem in the future?  I've never had paint run/clump/separate on a model before.  Notice the half-open window.  This model has lots of nice details like that:

From web searches, this tractor looks very prototypical except that the exhaust stack is curved and I couldn't find any examples of a grille with vertical sections.  Notice the Massachusetts license plate with 2018 and the year the company was founded:

All in all, I'm really happy with this model.  The only thing that's a bit rough is how the air horn was painted -- the silver slopped over the edges:

I would like to add a bulldog radiator cap but wonder whether the 1:48 scale will look a bit big on a 1:50 model.  Don Mills has a 1:55 scale, too.  Would it be better to go with a smaller one?  Your input is welcome.

Tomlinson Run Railroad

Tom

I like the story and the truck and the outside  pics are great. I would order the bulldog from don without the radiator cap he sells them both ways. Thanks for posting this I really enjoy it. 

lee drennen posted:
TomlinsonRunRR posted:

=snip= 

I would like to add a bulldog radiator cap but wonder whether the 1:48 scale will look a bit big on a 1:50 model.  Don Mills has a 1:55 scale, too.  Would it be better to go with a smaller one?  Your input is welcome.

Tomlinson Run Railroad

Tom

I like the story and the truck and the outside  pics are great. I would order the bulldog from don without the radiator cap he sells them both ways. Thanks for posting this I really enjoy it. 

Thanks, Lee.  For me, model railroads and the rail cars and autos I buy are all about stories.  (If food and little Chef Chuck Wagon are involved, all the better :-).  I particularly enjoy this thread and like to see what people have; and also learn from how you and others personalize your vehicles and layouts.  

I had meant to add earlier that I really like the yellow and black Mack that you posted recently along with the figures.   They are great.

Thanks for the tip about the Don Mills plain hood ornaments.  I hadn't noticed those.

Tomlinson Run Railroad

jackiejr posted:

What is your technique to DULL DOWN THE FINISH? 

                                      

                                          

Spray Testors Dullcoat onto the shiny surfaces.

The stuff is invaluable to any modeler.

Don Sierakowski 111617 posted:

Absolutely great stuff.   Do make certain to mask off any windows or chrome surfaces before you spray😉

Yep. I was lucky, in that this car model came apart with a set of screws, so I was able to reassemble it without the one-piece windshield casting (on which I had ground off one window to make it look 'rolled down' at the time) in place and I then blasted the whole thing with dullcoat. Once that dried, I took it apart again, added the 'glass' portion with the interior/driver and it was all good then.

The previous time, that truck model was riveted together so I had to mask off the 'glass'...

The green/red REA panel truck was purchased from Menards and is an accurate 1:48 scale model of a 1942-1946 Chevrolet one-half-ton panel truck. The blue Boston & Maine Railroad panel truck was purchased on line and was advertised as 1:43. They are the same model except for paint and roof rack.

MELGAR_05_AUTOS_29_46_CHEVY_B&M_REA

The red 1940 Ford pickup is noticeably smaller than the green REA 1942 Ford pickup which was advertised as 1:43. Both purchased on line. Not sure if the ’40 Ford was smaller than the ’42 or if the ’40 model is 1:48. Note difference in wheelbase. Just wondering…

MELGAR_07_AUTOS_31_40_42_FORD_PICKUPS

MELGAR

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ddurling posted:

This diorama isn’t part of my layout but it shows a Maserati A6GCS Berlinetta racing through the streets in the 1954 Giro do Sicilia. Believe it or not, the buildings are Ameritowne flats covered in Durham’s Water Putty!

FF36FF2E-03E9-4987-9138-9FDA7D0C6370

A great job of making the scene look like Italy or Monte Carlo. And the wartime scene too.

MELGAR

Don Sierakowski 111617 posted:

I like your idea of grinding down a part of the window—nice touch.  Masking small windows is not fun.  I’ve also drilled out those rivets—also not fun😡

Thanks. My layout takes place during 1943 in the late summer time. No auto ACs in that era. In real life, all the windows would have bene rolled down but the casting for the windows was once piece and I didn't want the sides to not have any structural integrity. So, only the driver's window is down.

I'm lucky the car came apart with philips screws, as many of them are riveted. I have more than a couple of windows in the up position that really wouldn't be normally because of that. No driver figures go into any of those cars.

9EA08F17-63D4-46A0-8574-D4AF2430215Cp51 posted:
ddurling posted:

Here’s another scene from the same diorama but with a slightly different feel.

BFC0F36A-E717-4F3B-9DC6-60776179B991

I love this shot! the only thing it's lacking are the banners and flags out. That, and the Italian girls swarming the GIs!

Thanks! Here’s the same scene from a different angle:

 

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Photos (1)
ddurling posted:
9EA08F17-63D4-46A0-8574-D4AF2430215C

 

Thanks! Here’s the same scene from a different angle: 

Wow, even better like that. They're perfectly posed for a scene of GI's stopping somewhere on the march to Rome. the GIs don't know why they're stopped or for how long, but many of them went indoors to do what soldiers do (look for booze, good food and women, something Italy has never lacked in any regard).

You nailed the posing of the figures and vehicles perfectly!

MELGAR posted:

The green/red REA panel truck was purchased from Menards and is an accurate 1:48 scale model of a 1942-1946 Chevrolet one-half-ton panel truck. The blue Boston & Main Railroad panel truck was purchased on line and was advertised as 1:43. They are the same model except for paint and roof rack.

 

The red 1940 Ford pickup is noticeably smaller than the green REA 1942 Ford pickup which was advertised as 1:43. Both purchased on line. Not sure if the ’40 Ford was smaller than the ’42 or if the ’40 model is 1:48. Note difference in wheelbase. Just wondering…

MELGAR_07_AUTOS_31_40_42_FORD_PICKUPS

MELGAR

I don't know about all that , but those sure are some snazzy white walls Melgar!   

Look's like it would make for a nice off road buggy ride.

MELGAR posted:

The red 1940 Ford pickup is noticeably smaller than the green REA 1942 Ford pickup which was advertised as 1:43. Both purchased on line. Not sure if the ’40 Ford was smaller than the ’42 or if the ’40 model is 1:48. Note difference in wheelbase. Just wondering…

MELGAR_07_AUTOS_31_40_42_FORD_PICKUPS

MELGAR

They look about the same scale. It seems to me that there is insufficient space for a spare tire between the cab and the rear fender on the red pickup. The longer wheel base and bed of the green pickup allows enough space to accommodate a spare tire.

 Guys you’re posting some great stuff!

Bob.  What I would like to see is NEO models Lower their prices were the average working man can buy them say around $20 to maybe $30 at the most they have just about every car I ever wanted but I just can’t see paying almost $100 or more for just one car that’s made out of resin I found out over time there Resin will start to shrink and warp even when you keep it in a regular temperature.

 Lee.  That is some great stuff you guys are posting appreciate you coming over here posting your stuff.

 Vincent.  thanks for posting the 55 Chevy always was one of my favorites better than the 57 

Thanks  for posting that World War II stuff I have a special place my heart for all  World War II vehicles that served in the war. 

  Quartergauger 48 . I like that pic 

6D4F9CB4-552B-4937-973E-AB5EBC41FE0DD24A2072-4B15-43A1-B9A9-8004266A9ECCF0B88B1B-6BB9-4F7C-B6D1-494546B7695F9FF93B1A-FF14-4D07-815B-31891431CECF51877B29-8B5B-4A85-997C-8758D221CA5C39B07F79-8B1D-4886-86ED-D30963F49D5F51E035F0-2704-4188-9592-23EFC08F0018I think I’ve posted this before but Incase you guys never seen it  this is my deuce and a half with a aftermarket Resin dump bed that I built last year. I remove the side boards from the cargo bed and added them to the dump bed and when I was finished with it I lightly weathered it. 

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lee drennen posted:

 What I would like to see is NEO models Lower their prices were the average working man can buy them say around $20 to maybe $30 at the most they have just about every car I ever wanted but I just can’t see paying almost $100 or more for just one car...

There are many beautiful car models for sale on line but my personal limit is about $30. I guess it's costly to produce a good diecast model but many of the ones I'd like to have are $100 and I just won't pay that no matter what.

MELGAR

lee drennen posted:

9FF93B1A-FF14-4D07-815B-31891431CECF51877B29-8B5B-4A85-997C-8758D221CA5CI think I’ve posted this before but Incase you guys never seen it  this is my deuce and a half with a aftermarket Resin dump bed that I built last year. 

Great late war CCKW 353H1 dump variant. Not many of these were made in real life.

By the way, they didn't call them duce and a halfs during WW2. That came along much later.

MELGAR posted:

The green/red REA panel truck was purchased from Menards and is an accurate 1:48 scale model of a 1942-1946 Chevrolet one-half-ton panel truck. The blue Boston & Maine Railroad panel truck was purchased on line and was advertised as 1:43. They are the same model except for paint and roof rack.

MELGAR_05_AUTOS_29_46_CHEVY_B&M_REA

The red 1940 Ford pickup is noticeably smaller than the green REA 1942 Ford pickup which was advertised as 1:43. Both purchased on line. Not sure if the ’40 Ford was smaller than the ’42 or if the ’40 model is 1:48. Note difference in wheelbase. Just wondering…

MELGAR_07_AUTOS_31_40_42_FORD_PICKUPS

MELGAR

The actual 40 Ford was manufactured with a shorter wheelbase and box.  The 41 and 42 last year of production until 1946, after the war and kept the same dimensions as 42 through 1950.  

 Quarter Gauger 48'

 

Gred 

 Image result for us army insigniaColors Don't Run Decal

I found an internet photograph of what the u.s. government license plates looked like on civilian type vehicles during World War II. So, I made a copy of them to scale, and put them on the 35 Ford after changing the number. They're really tough to read, but at least it's the right kind of plate.

GovUS330225192039a-01

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Photos (2)
Quarter Gauger 48 posted:
MELGAR posted:
The red 1940 Ford pickup is noticeably smaller than the green REA 1942 Ford pickup which was advertised as 1:43. Both purchased on line. Not sure if the ’40 Ford was smaller than the ’42 or if the ’40 model is 1:48. Note difference in wheelbase. Just wondering…

MELGAR_07_AUTOS_31_40_42_FORD_PICKUPS

MELGAR

The actual 40 Ford was manufactured with a shorter wheelbase and box.  The 41 and 42 last year of production until 1946, after the war and kept the same dimensions as 42 through 1950.  

If that's the case, then the red '40 Ford model must also be 1:43 - which is what I thought. Thanks for the info.

MELGAR

MELGAR posted:
Quarter Gauger 48 posted:
MELGAR posted:
The red 1940 Ford pickup is noticeably smaller than the green REA 1942 Ford pickup which was advertised as 1:43. Both purchased on line. Not sure if the ’40 Ford was smaller than the ’42 or if the ’40 model is 1:48. Note difference in wheelbase. Just wondering…

MELGAR_07_AUTOS_31_40_42_FORD_PICKUPS

MELGAR

The actual 40 Ford was manufactured with a shorter wheelbase and box.  The 41 and 42 last year of production until 1946, after the war and kept the same dimensions as 42 through 1950.  

If that's the case, then the red '40 Ford model must also be 1:43 - which is what I thought. Thanks for the info.

MELGAR

If the 40 Ford is a "Matchbox Masterpiece"  it is indeed an actual true scale 1:43. The less expensive models are actually closer to a scale of 1:40.  And are a tad larger.  There are very few true scale 1:48 die cast replicas.  And most of those are trucks.  As we all know, "Boston Models" out of England, is the most accurate 1:43 scale models.  And thus the highest price, asides from "American Excellence" which is very similar in scale and price'.... Okay, rant over'...

 

 Quarter Gauger 48'

 

Gred 

 Image result for us army insigniaColors Don't Run Decal

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