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I’m adding a 14-inch by 30-inch extension at the north (back) end of my 12’-by-8’ layout that essentially will be a diorama with a town scene. This will give me the opportunity to build some structure models and scenery to fill the space.

Witzinger’s Washboards is an O scale background kit produced by Bar Mills Models. Witzinger’s will be at the rear of the scene against the wall and, although it will be in the background, I plan to finish the model to the usual level of detail on my railroads – not phenomenal but carefully built. Scenery and structure-building are my favorite model railroading activities, so all buildings on my layouts are built from kits or from scratch. Nothing is purchased and just dropped onto the layout. However, I do prefer to build from kits. It’s so much easier to buy a kit with all the materials needed to build a model rather than purchasing from multiple sellers. And, my fingers are no longer up to the stress of cutting window openings in basswood. I thought that people on the OGR Forum might be interested in seeing a step-by-step description of how I build this model, and that’s what this thread will be.

This kit is simple and easy to build. Bar Mills says it can be done in a few evenings – but I work slowly and plan on modifying the model to better fit the limited space I have available. Although I’m an experienced modeler, I do read the instructions before starting and refer to them while working. The building has two parts – an office (at left) and a factory (at right). I began with the office.

Photo 1 shows six pieces of milled clapboard walls that came in the kit. Very nice materials. Since this is a background model, a piece of cardstock is supplied for the rear wall. I sanded the edges of the wall pieces so that they would go together cleanly with the smallest possible gap.

MELGAR_PHOTO_01_WITZINGERS_LEFT_BLDG_WALLS

Photo 2 shows the upper and lower clapboard pieces joined together. I did this with the pieces on a flat surface and beneath weights (peanut jars filled with coins are my favorites) to hold them flat while the glue dried. I added half-inch extensions inside the bottoms of the clapboards that will be covered by a “brick” foundation that will look more realistic than leaving the clapboards in contact with the ground, as on the basic model.

MELGAR_PHOTO_02_WITZINGERS_LEFT_BLDG_CLAPBOARDS_JOINED_W_FOUNDATIONS

As shown in Photo 3, bracing was added to the back side of the walls to eliminate warpage due to painting. This included horizontal bracing to support a “second floor” that will serve as a view-block between it and the ground floor. I used more bracing than shown in the instructions.

MELGAR_PHOTO_03_WITZINGERS_LEFT_BLDG_BRACING

Photo 4 shows the three walls being assembled. The front wall was held flat under a wood block and a heavy weight. Glue was then applied to the edges and the side walls were placed into a vertical orientation, as checked by a 90-degree-square, with wood blocks and weights behind them to maintain alignment. As a retired engineer, I’m particular about having my models built “square.”

MELGAR_PHOTO_04_WITZINGERS_LEFT_BLDG_ASSEMBLY

Photos 5 and 6 show the three walls assembled. After the assembly, small blocks were added to the inside corners of the foundation pieces to keep them square when the “bricks” are attached. Note that there is a gap in the clapboard walls at each front corner that will be filled later by vertical corner-boards. This will allow the corner-boards to be painted in a contrasting trim color from the clapboard exterior walls before being added to the model, so that the color separation will be neat.

MELGAR_PHOTO_05_WITZINGERS_LEFT_BLDG_WALLS_ASSEMBLEDMELGAR_PHOTO_06_WITZINGERS_LEFT_BLDG_WALLS_ASSEMBLED

To be continued.

MELGAR

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Images (6)
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_01_WITZINGERS_LEFT_BLDG_WALLS
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_02_WITZINGERS_LEFT_BLDG_CLAPBOARDS_JOINED_W_FOUNDATIONS
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_03_WITZINGERS_LEFT_BLDG_BRACING
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_04_WITZINGERS_LEFT_BLDG_ASSEMBLY
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_05_WITZINGERS_LEFT_BLDG_WALLS_ASSEMBLED
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_06_WITZINGERS_LEFT_BLDG_WALLS_ASSEMBLED
Original Post

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@ctr posted:

Do you use a brush or airbrush?

@PRR1950 posted:

May I ask what type of glue you are using and why you made that choice?  Did you try test fitting before you decided to sand the edges?

I paint wood and plastic structures using a brush and mostly with acrylic paints that clean up with water. I don't apply primer to wood structures because I think they look better when the wood texture can be seen. That's why I'm careful about bracing.

I use "Titebond II" yellow carpenter's glue for basswood models, Testor's styrene cement (in a tube) for plastic models, and epoxy (half-hour working-time) for metal-to-wood. I don't use CA or rapid-drying adhesives. I prefer to have extra working-time, set the parts into exact position, and then take a break to let the glue dry. Yellow carpenter's glue dries in about two hours and creates a strong bond.

Every part is test-fitted multiple times before I apply glue and attach it to the model. Even laser-cut parts need the edges cleaned-up by filing or sanding to remove the nubs that hold them to the wood sheet. And parts that need to be cut with a hobby knife (I prefer a single-edge razor blade or razor saw) need to be "trued up" to be square and have flat edges. I sand the edges of large parts by laying a piece of sandpaper on the workbench and moving the part over the sandpaper to straighten the edge.

MELGAR

Mel, another great how to for me to follow.  Thank you for sharing your methods with us.  They produce some wonderful results as can be seen on both of your layouts.  A question about the backside bracing, was the bracing material provided with the kit?  You said you applied extra so I believe it is additional dimensional lumber.

Witzinger's Post 2 - August 6, 2021

With the three walls of the office (left building) assembled, my next step was to cut a 2nd floor to act as a view-block. This prevents being able to look into the 2nd floor windows and see out through the 1st floor windows. It wasn’t really necessary to do on this background building but I included it because it made the structure stronger and will help to preserve squareness until the rear wall is added. Photo 7 shows the floor piece cut from 1/32-inch-thick basswood and Photo 8 shows it after installation.

MELGAR_PHOTO_07_WITZINGERS_LEFT_BLDG_2ND_FLOOR_CUTMELGAR_PHOTO_08_WITZINGERS_LEFT_BLDG_W_2ND_FLOOR

This completed the initial assembly of the office (left building) and I began to build the factory (right building).

Photo 9 shows the three scribed basswood exterior wall pieces and edge bracing pieces of the factory (right building).

MELGAR_PHOTO_09_WITZINGERS_RIGHT_BLDG_WALLS

Photo 10 shows these pieces set up during assembly, with weights and wood blocks used to maintain squareness.

MELGAR_PHOTO_10_WITZINGERS_RIGHT_BLDG_ASSEMBLY

Photo 11 shows the assembled walls including additional vertical and horizontal bracing to support the 2nd floor.

MELGAR_PHOTO_11_WITZINGERS_RIGHT_BLDG_WALLS_ASSEMBLED

As shown in Photo 12, a 2nd floor was cut for the factory. This also included extra bracing to maintain flatness of the floor, which needed extra support due to the short wall on one side.

MELGAR_PHOTO_12_WITZINGERS_RIGHT_BLDG_2ND_FLOOR_CUT

As shown in Photo 13, I was careful to maintain squareness and flatness during installation of the floor because they would eventually affect flatness of the rear wall of the combined office and factory buildings.

MELGAR_PHOTO_13_WITZINGERS_RIGHT_BLDG_2ND_FLOOR_DURING_ASSEMBLY

Photo 14 shows the assembled factory walls and floor.

MELGAR_PHOTO_14_WITZINGERS_RIGHT_BLDG_2ND_FLOOR

With the exterior walls and floors completed, I set up the office and factory sections next to each other and against a flat vertical wall, as shown in Photo 15, to check their fit, alignment and squareness, which seemed to be satisfactory. However, I did not combine the two sections because I thought it would be easier to paint them and install the windows and glazing while they were separate.

MELGAR_PHOTO_15_WITZINGERS_TEST_FIT

To be continued.

MELGAR

Attachments

Images (9)
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_07_WITZINGERS_LEFT_BLDG_2ND_FLOOR_CUT
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_08_WITZINGERS_LEFT_BLDG_W_2ND_FLOOR
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_09_WITZINGERS_RIGHT_BLDG_WALLS
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_10_WITZINGERS_RIGHT_BLDG_ASSEMBLY
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_11_WITZINGERS_RIGHT_BLDG_WALLS_ASSEMBLED
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_12_WITZINGERS_RIGHT_BLDG_2ND_FLOOR_CUT
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_13_WITZINGERS_RIGHT_BLDG_2ND_FLOOR_DURING_ASSEMBLY
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_14_WITZINGERS_RIGHT_BLDG_2ND_FLOOR
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_15_WITZINGERS_TEST_FIT

Witzinger's Post 3 - August 14, 2021

Next, I began to paint the exterior walls of the building – “Burnt Sienna” acrylic for the office and “Earth Tone” acrylic for the factory. I preferred to use a brush for this because it produced a realistic variation in the color of the wood walls. After the paint was dry, I applied a mixture of alcohol and India ink to give a slight weathering effect, as shown in Photo 16. I also added an additional reinforcement between the tops of the office walls.

MELGAR_PHOTO_16_WITZINGERS__PAINTED

Photo 17 shows the two sheets of plywood parts for the windows, doors and trim. These sheets are “peel-and-stick” with adhesive on the backs and do not require glue for assembly. However, I do apply small amounts of yellow carpenter’s glue to ensure permanence of the bonds. I painted the office trim “Chocolate Brown” and the windows “Sand,” for contrast, as shown in Photo 18. I then assembled the office windows and trim, cut the acetate glazing to size, and assembled the office windows, as shown in Photo 19. Photo 20 shows the factory windows and doors, painted “Hunter Green,” and Photo 21 shows the assembled factory windows and doors, including glazing. Painting laser-cut-wood window parts is tedious. It took me more than eight hours to paint and assemble the windows, doors and glazing for the office and factory. Some kits supply plastic windows, which are somewhat quicker to prepare.

MELGAR_PHOTO_17_WITZINGERS_WINDOW_SHEETSMELGAR_PHOTO_18_WITZINGERS_26_LEFT_SIDE_WINDOW_PARTS_PAINTEDMELGAR_PHOTO_19_WITZINGERS_LEFT_SIDE_WINDOWS_ASSEMBLEDMELGAR_PHOTO_20_WITZINGERS_RIGHT_SIDE_WINDOWS_DOORS_PAINTEDMELGAR_PHOTO_21_WITZINGERS_RIGHT_SIDE_WINDOWS_DOORS_ASSEMBLED

Photo 22 shows the windows, doors and glazing installed in the office and factory walls.

MELGAR_PHOTO_22_WITZINGERS_WINDOWS_DOORS_GLAZING_INSTALLED

Next, I chose an easy task. Photo 23 shows the rear of the office and factory with strips of paper glued to the insides of the windows to simulate window shades. Photo 24 is a front view showing the shades and sills (on the office windows).

MELGAR_PHOTO_23_WITZINGERS_WINDOW_SHADES_INSTALLEDMELGAR_PHOTO_24_WITZINGERS_WINDOW_SHADES_INSTALLED

I then prepared foundation pieces for the office and factory. These were not in the kit. The office received a “rough brick” foundation (1/2-inch height exposed – 2 feet full-scale) cut from plastic sheets, painted mineral red, followed by “concrete” for mortar. The factory foundation was cut from “taskboard” (1/8-inch height exposed – 6 inches full-scale), which has a surface texture that looks like concrete. Photos 25 and 26 show the foundation pieces. Photos 27 and 28 show the brick foundation applied to the office with polystyrene glue.

MELGAR_PHOTO_25_WITZINGERS_FOUNDATION_PIECESMELGAR_PHOTO_26_WITZINGERS_BRICK_MORTAR_FOUNDATIONMELGAR_PHOTO_27_WITZINGERS_OFFICE_BRICK_FOUNDATIONMELGAR_PHOTO_28_WITZINGERS_OFFICE_BRICK_FOUNDATION

At this point, the office and factory sections were ready to be joined together.

To be continued.

MELGAR

Attachments

Images (13)
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_16_WITZINGERS__PAINTED
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_17_WITZINGERS_WINDOW_SHEETS
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_18_WITZINGERS_26_LEFT_SIDE_WINDOW_PARTS_PAINTED
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_19_WITZINGERS_LEFT_SIDE_WINDOWS_ASSEMBLED
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_20_WITZINGERS_RIGHT_SIDE_WINDOWS_DOORS_PAINTED
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_21_WITZINGERS_RIGHT_SIDE_WINDOWS_DOORS_ASSEMBLED
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_22_WITZINGERS_WINDOWS_DOORS_GLAZING_INSTALLED
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_23_WITZINGERS_WINDOW_SHADES_INSTALLED
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_24_WITZINGERS_WINDOW_SHADES_INSTALLED
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_25_WITZINGERS_FOUNDATION_PIECES
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_26_WITZINGERS_BRICK_MORTAR_FOUNDATION
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_27_WITZINGERS_OFFICE_BRICK_FOUNDATION
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_28_WITZINGERS_OFFICE_BRICK_FOUNDATION

Witzinger's Post 4 - August 20, 2021

I attached “taskboard” foundation pieces (painted “concrete”) to the factory base and began to look at how to join the office and factory sections together. Photo 29 shows the two sections in position, lying flat on the workbench. The design of the kit requires the vertical rear edge of the short factory wall to be glued into the 1/16-inch-square notch at the right front corner of the office (see Photo 28 above). This surface does not have enough area to securely combine the two sections. A full-depth left factory wall would have avoided this issue. I applied glue to the right front corner of the office, and put the two sections into position flat on the workbench, having made sure that the bottoms of the foundations were aligned. When the glue dried, I turned the structure around and added reinforcement to the common wall, which can be seen in Photo 30.

MELGAR_PHOTO_29_WITZINGERS__ASSEMBLY_SETUP_FRONTMELGAR_PHOTO_30_WITZINGERS_SETUP_REINFORCEMENT

My next step was to add four small pieces for door-pulls on the factory doors, as shown in Photo 31.

MELGAR_PHOTO_31_WITZINGERS_FACTORY_DOOR_PULLS

The connection between the office and factory was further strengthened by inserting 1st floors in both sections, as shown in Photo 32.

MELGAR_PHOTO_32_WITZINGERS_REAR_VIEW

I next turned my attention to the office roof and chimney. Photo 33 shows the two cardstock pieces for the roof that were included with the kit and the unpainted chimney purchased separately from Bar Mills Models.

MELGAR_PHOTO_33_WITZINGERS_OFFICE_ROOF_CHIMNEY

I intended to use both cardstock pieces, but I was not satisfied with the fit of the folded triangular panels, so I cut two triangular pieces from basswood and fitted them exactly to the structure. The pieces and painted chimney are shown in Photo 34.

MELGAR_PHOTO_34_WITZINGERS_OFFICE_ROOF_PARTS

Note that I cut a hole for the chimney in the rectangular roof panel and surrounded it with rust-colored paper to look like roof flashing. My procedure for mounting chimneys is shown in Photo 35. I fabricate a horizontal mount just beneath the roof, and apply epoxy to secure the chimney to the mount. This attachment is stronger and looks better than simply gluing to the chimney to the surface of the roof.

MELGAR_PHOTO_35_WITZINGERS_REAR_VIEW_CHIMNEY_MOUNT

Photo 36 shows the office roof ready for application of shingles and the chimney.

MELGAR_PHOTO_36_WITZINGERS_OFFICE_ROOF_ASSEMBLY

I decided to install the factory roof before applying shingles to the office roof and chose to substitute a piece of basswood for the cardstock part that was supplied in the kit. I also cut three trim pieces to be placed around the upper perimeter of the roof that will be painted Hunter Green to match the green factory trim color, and a piece of black construction paper to cover the remainder of the roof to provide a rough texture without woodgrain, as shown in Photo 37.

MELGAR_PHOTO_37_WITZINGERS_FACTORY_ROOF_PARTS

Photo 38 shows the bracing I applied to the underside of the roof. Photo 39 shows the factory roof pieces painted before assembly.

MELGAR_PHOTO_38_WITZINGERS_FACTORY_ROOF_BOTTOMMELGAR_PHOTO_39_WITZINGERS_FACTORY_ROOF_PARTS_PAINTED

Photos 40 and 41 show the factory roof installed.

MELGAR_PHOTO_40_WITZINGERS_FACTORY_ROOF_ATTACHEDMELGAR_PHOTO_41_WITZINGERS_FACTORY_ROOF_ATTACHED

Photos 42 and 43 show the model on the layout.

MELGAR_PHOTO_42_WITZINGERS_ON_LAYOUTMELGAR_PHOTO_43_WITZINGERS_ON_LAYOUT

I expect that the next step will be applying shingles to the office roof.

To be continued.

MELGAR

Attachments

Images (15)
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_29_WITZINGERS__ASSEMBLY_SETUP_FRONT
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_30_WITZINGERS_SETUP_REINFORCEMENT
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_31_WITZINGERS_FACTORY_DOOR_PULLS
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_32_WITZINGERS_REAR_VIEW
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_33_WITZINGERS_OFFICE_ROOF_CHIMNEY
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_34_WITZINGERS_OFFICE_ROOF_PARTS
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_35_WITZINGERS_REAR_VIEW_CHIMNEY_MOUNT
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_36_WITZINGERS_OFFICE_ROOF_ASSEMBLY
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_37_WITZINGERS_FACTORY_ROOF_PARTS
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_38_WITZINGERS_FACTORY_ROOF_BOTTOM
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_39_WITZINGERS_FACTORY_ROOF_PARTS_PAINTED
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_40_WITZINGERS_FACTORY_ROOF_ATTACHED
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_41_WITZINGERS_FACTORY_ROOF_ATTACHED
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_42_WITZINGERS_ON_LAYOUT
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_43_WITZINGERS_ON_LAYOUT
Last edited by MELGAR
@MELGAR posted:

Joe,

As you know, people enjoy model railroading in different ways. For me, the most interesting part of the experience is building the layout - track, terrain, bridges, tunnels, structures, towns and scenery. But I do like running trains, too. I do more of that after the layout is finished.

MELGAR

Mel, I knew you enjoyed the modelling that's why I was glad when you another area that the town could grow into.

@ctr posted:

Melgar,

What kind of paint are you using to paint the model?

Do you use brushes or airbrush?

Thank you.

CTR

I prefer water-based acrylic paints and water cleanup compared to other types. I sometimes apply weathering with a mixture of alcohol and India ink, and may mix in some brown earth tone. I don't use an airbrush on the exteriors of wood buildings because I want them to look a bit weathered with variations in color and texture - which a brush produces on basswood.

MELGAR

Witzinger's Post 5 - August 28, 2021

Next step was to install the “slate” shingles covering the office roof. As shown in Photo 44, these are supplied as a sheet of paper strips.

MELGAR_PHOTO_44_WITZINGERS_ROOF_SHINGLES

Photo 45 shows the process of cutting and fitting each strip to correct length and angle, and gluing into position with yellow carpenter’s glue.

MELGAR_PHOTO_45_WITZINGERS_APPLYING_SHINGLES

The angled ends of the shingle strips were cut to match the rust-colored strips at the intersections of the roof panels, which are supposed to look like copper flashing. Each shingle strip overlaps the previous one and is also offset, as can be seen in Photo 46.

MELGAR_PHOTO_46_WITZINGERS_APPLYING_SHINGLES

I cut the strips slightly longer than necessary and trim the edges after all the shingles are installed, as shown in Photos 47 and 48. Shingle installation is a tedious process. It took me eight hours to do the office roof shingles.

MELGAR_PHOTO_47_WITZINGERS_OFFICE_ROOF_SHINGLESMELGAR_PHOTO_48_WITZINGERS_OFFICE_ROOF_SHINGLES

The remaining tasks on the model involve various details that can be omitted or customized, especially if the builder is willing to make some components from scratch.

The kit instructions show an auxiliary roof just above the 1st floor office windows, supported unrealistically and made from cardstock. Instead, I cut and assembled triangular supporting brackets and applied “slate” shingles to a basswood panel, as shown in Photos 49 and 50.

MELGAR_PHOTO_49_WITZINGERS_AUXILIARY_ROOF_PARTSMELGAR_PHOTO_50_WITZINGERS_AUXILIARY_ROOF_SHINGLES

I then attached the brackets to the auxiliary roof and mounted the assembly to the front of the office. The accurate cutting and assembly of the small parts for the brackets was time-consuming. I spent six hours on the auxiliary roof.

The instructions also show three awnings above the 2nd floor office windows. The kit provides colored paper to make the awnings by folding the paper into shape. Again, I did not find this satisfactory, so I fabricated three awnings from 1/32-inch-thick basswood, assembled and painted them, applied roof shingles, as shown in Photo 51, and mounted them to the front of the office, as shown in Photo 52. The accurate cutting and assembly of the small parts for the awnings was time-consuming. I spent five hours on the awnings.

MELGAR_PHOTO_51_WITZINGERS_AUXILIARY_ROOF_INSTALLED_AWNINGSMELGAR_PHOTO_52_WITZINGERS_AWNINGS_INSTALLED

The times I needed to make the numerous small parts for the auxiliary roof and awnings show the advantage of building from a laser-cut wood kit with its accurately cut parts, although the Witzinger’s kit did not include all such parts, and the instructions proposed short-cuts, that I did not use, to save time.

I also applied trim under the eaves of the office roof and attached the chimney with epoxy. Photos 53 and 54 show these parts.

MELGAR_PHOTO_53_WITZINGERS_AWNINGS_INSTALLEDMELGAR_PHOTO_54_WITZINGERS_AWNINGS_INSTALLED

Photos 55 and 56 show the model on the layout expansion.

MELGAR_PHOTO_55_WITZINGERS_ON_LAYOUTMELGAR_PHOTO_56_WITZINGERS_ON_LAYOUT

Several details remain to be completed. There will be a rooftop billboard that will require scratch-built construction of the billboard frame. This will be followed by a stick-built loading dock and an auxiliary roof at the front of the factory.

To be continued.

MELGAR

Attachments

Images (13)
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_44_WITZINGERS_ROOF_SHINGLES
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_45_WITZINGERS_APPLYING_SHINGLES
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_46_WITZINGERS_APPLYING_SHINGLES
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_47_WITZINGERS_OFFICE_ROOF_SHINGLES
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_48_WITZINGERS_OFFICE_ROOF_SHINGLES
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_49_WITZINGERS_AUXILIARY_ROOF_PARTS
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_50_WITZINGERS_AUXILIARY_ROOF_SHINGLES
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_51_WITZINGERS_AUXILIARY_ROOF_INSTALLED_AWNINGS
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_52_WITZINGERS_AWNINGS_INSTALLED
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_53_WITZINGERS_AWNINGS_INSTALLED
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_54_WITZINGERS_AWNINGS_INSTALLED
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_55_WITZINGERS_ON_LAYOUT
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_56_WITZINGERS_ON_LAYOUT
@MELGAR posted:

Witzinger's Post 5 - August 28, 2021

Next step was to install the “slate” shingles covering the office roof. As shown in Photo 44, these are supplied as a sheet of paper strips.

MELGAR_PHOTO_44_WITZINGERS_ROOF_SHINGLES

Photo 45 shows the process of cutting and fitting each strip to correct length and angle, and gluing into position with yellow carpenter’s glue.

MELGAR_PHOTO_45_WITZINGERS_APPLYING_SHINGLES

The angled ends of the shingle strips were cut to match the rust-colored strips at the intersections of the roof panels, which are supposed to look like copper flashing. Each shingle strip overlaps the previous one and is also offset, as can be seen in Photo 46.

MELGAR_PHOTO_46_WITZINGERS_APPLYING_SHINGLES

I cut the strips slightly longer than necessary and trim the edges after all the shingles are installed, as shown in Photos 47 and 48. Shingle installation is a tedious process. It took me eight hours to do the office roof shingles.

MELGAR_PHOTO_47_WITZINGERS_OFFICE_ROOF_SHINGLESMELGAR_PHOTO_48_WITZINGERS_OFFICE_ROOF_SHINGLES

The remaining tasks on the model involve various details that can be omitted or customized, especially if the builder is willing to make some components from scratch.

The kit instructions show an auxiliary roof just above the 1st floor office windows, supported unrealistically and made from cardstock. Instead, I cut and assembled triangular supporting brackets and applied “slate” shingles to a basswood panel, as shown in Photos 49 and 50.

MELGAR_PHOTO_49_WITZINGERS_AUXILIARY_ROOF_PARTSMELGAR_PHOTO_50_WITZINGERS_AUXILIARY_ROOF_SHINGLES

I then attached the brackets to the auxiliary roof and mounted the assembly to the front of the office. The accurate cutting and assembly of the small parts for the brackets was time-consuming. I spent six hours on the auxiliary roof.

The instructions also show three awnings above the 2nd floor office windows. The kit provides colored paper to make the awnings by folding the paper into shape. Again, I did not find this satisfactory, so I fabricated three awnings from 1/32-inch-thick basswood, assembled and painted them, applied roof shingles, as shown in Photo 51, and mounted them to the front of the office, as shown in Photo 52. The accurate cutting and assembly of the small parts for the awnings was time-consuming. I spent five hours on the awnings.

MELGAR_PHOTO_51_WITZINGERS_AUXILIARY_ROOF_INSTALLED_AWNINGSMELGAR_PHOTO_52_WITZINGERS_AWNINGS_INSTALLED

The times I needed to make the numerous small parts for the auxiliary roof and awnings show the advantage of building from a laser-cut wood kit with its accurately cut parts, although the Witzinger’s kit did not include all such parts, and the instructions proposed short-cuts, that I did not use, to save time.

I also applied trim under the eaves of the office roof and attached the chimney with epoxy. Photos 53 and 54 show these parts.

MELGAR_PHOTO_53_WITZINGERS_AWNINGS_INSTALLEDMELGAR_PHOTO_54_WITZINGERS_AWNINGS_INSTALLED

Photos 55 and 56 show the model on the layout expansion.

MELGAR_PHOTO_55_WITZINGERS_ON_LAYOUTMELGAR_PHOTO_56_WITZINGERS_ON_LAYOUT

Several details remain to be completed. There will be a rooftop billboard that will require scratch-built construction of the billboard frame. This will be followed by a stick-built loading dock and an auxiliary roof at the front of the factory.

To be continued.

MELGAR

Superb modeling; sure wish I had as nice a roof on my house, particularly because my existing roof is about 25 years old.

Witzinger's Post 6 – September 4, 2021

I chose Witzinger’s as a model for my layout expansion scene because I needed a background building and because it had a rooftop billboard that would be noticed even though it would be at the rear of the layout.

As packaged in the Bar Mills kit, the billboard was printed on paper and had to be attached to a rectangular backing piece and then to a framework, as shown in Photo 57. I applied a mixture of alcohol and India ink to give the wood parts a weathered look, as I did to the other wood parts that I added to the billboard framework. The backing piece had “peel-and-stick” adhesive on its front, so I simply removed the protective covering (peel) and pressed the printed billboard into position (stick).

MELGAR_PHOTO_57_WITZINGERS_BILLBOARD_PARTS

No other parts to mount the billboard atop the factory roof were supplied in the kit – which I thought would not produce a secure attachment or look realistic. Therefore, I made a pattern from which I fabricated four “A-frames,” as shown in Photos 58 and 59. The pattern aided in making all the “A-frames” with nearly the same angle and dimensions.

MELGAR_PHOTO_58_WITZINGERS_BILLBOARD_AFRAME_PARTSMELGAR_PHOTO_59_WITZINGERS_BILLBOARD_AFRAMES

I then mounted the “A-frames” to the rear of the billboard, as shown in Photo 60. I also added a connecting cross-member and square mounting pads at the bottoms of the “A-frames.” The mounting pads were punch-outs from the laser-cut window frames.

MELGAR_PHOTO_60_WITZINGERS_BILLBOARD_REAR

Photo 61 is a front view of the completed billboard.

MELGAR_PHOTO_61_WITZINGERS_BILLBOARD_FRONT

The kit also included a “Witzinger’s” sign that was sized and shaped to cover the front wall of the office above the awnings and up to the peak. Too big, in my opinion. Worse yet, the lettering was of variable size. Unfortunately, I don’t have any printing capability right now, so my choices were to use the kit sign or omit it altogether. So, I cut the sign down to a smaller size but retained the lettering and glued it to a thin backing. I also cut surrounding trim pieces, painted them black, and attached them to the edges of the sign. The completed sign is shown in Photo 62.

MELGAR_PHOTO_62_WITZINGERS_SIGN_ASSEMBLED

Photos 63 and 64 show Witzinger’s with the billboard and sign in place.

MELGAR_PHOTO_63_WITZINGERS_BILLBOARD_SIGN_MOUNTEDMELGAR_PHOTO_64_WITZINGERS_BILLBOARD_SIGN_MOUNTED

The loading dock and auxiliary roof in front of the factory doors were next.

The auxiliary roof in front of the factory doors was made from a piece of basswood covered with construction paper and painted black to match the factory roof. As shown in Photo 65, I added a stiffener and three supporting brackets.

MELGAR_PHOTO_65_WITZINGERS_FACTORY_AUXILIARY_ROOF

The loading dock was constructed from many small pieces, some of which are shown in Photo 66. Every loading dock part had to be cut to length individually from stripwood.

MELGAR_PHOTO_66_WITZINGERS_LOADING_DOCK_PARTS

Photo 67 shows the assembled loading dock and Photo 68 shows it ready to be attached to the factory front. It took me five hours to make the loading dock.

MELGAR_PHOTO_67_WITZINGERS_LOADING_DOCKMELGAR_PHOTO_68_WITZINGERS_LOADING_DOCK_ASSEMBLED

The completed model is shown in Photos 69 through 73, and on the layout in Photo 74.

MELGAR_PHOTO_69_WITZINGERS_COMPLETEMELGAR_PHOTO_70_WITZINGERS_COMPLETEMELGAR_PHOTO_71_WITZINGERS_COMPLETEMELGAR_PHOTO_72_WITZINGERS_COMPLETEMELGAR_PHOTO_73_WITZINGERS_COMPLETEMELGAR_PHOTO_74_WITZINGERS_COMPLETE_ON_LAYOUT

I spent eighty-five hours building Witzinger’s.

At this point, I plan to build another structure model for the layout expansion. Depending on the other models I select, and their placement on the expansion, there is a possibility that I will eventually expand Witzinger’s with an addition at the side of the factory.

MELGAR

Attachments

Images (18)
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_57_WITZINGERS_BILLBOARD_PARTS
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_58_WITZINGERS_BILLBOARD_AFRAME_PARTS
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_59_WITZINGERS_BILLBOARD_AFRAMES
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_60_WITZINGERS_BILLBOARD_REAR
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_61_WITZINGERS_BILLBOARD_FRONT
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_62_WITZINGERS_SIGN_ASSEMBLED
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_63_WITZINGERS_BILLBOARD_SIGN_MOUNTED
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_64_WITZINGERS_BILLBOARD_SIGN_MOUNTED
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_65_WITZINGERS_FACTORY_AUXILIARY_ROOF
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_66_WITZINGERS_LOADING_DOCK_PARTS
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_67_WITZINGERS_LOADING_DOCK
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_68_WITZINGERS_LOADING_DOCK_ASSEMBLED
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_69_WITZINGERS_COMPLETE
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_70_WITZINGERS_COMPLETE
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_71_WITZINGERS_COMPLETE
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_72_WITZINGERS_COMPLETE
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_73_WITZINGERS_COMPLETE
  • MELGAR_PHOTO_74_WITZINGERS_COMPLETE_ON_LAYOUT

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