Cure for wheel drop at frog.

I don't use anything quite so fancy.  I just mix a batch of JB Weld and put it in the frog.  I level it with a flat toothpick and add more where it is low.  I try not to get it so high that it actually lifts the wheels.  I clean the inside of the rails with a cloth before it sets.

Ed

The closer one gets to a prototype wheel profile (i.e. thinner wheel) the greater the wheel drop at the frog.  Conventional, fat O Scale wheels sale through frogs, happily. Alas, they look kinda crummy on models.   Ok, not "pretty", but my solution is dropping a portion of a round toothpick in the frog groove - that more or less supports the near-scale wheels.

prrhorseshoecurve posted:

IF you went with Ross Switches and/or have some Curtis Switches in the first place, You don't feel the Wheel drop at all!

Actually, in a 2-rail situation, you get wheel drop on larger frogs because of the space involved, the rail height, and the flange depth. With a larger Ross turnout, you do get some wheel drop even with hi-rail flanges and, like prototype, the flange rides on the base of the frog. We put the frog point in because some members run 2-rail cars and/or locomotives with smaller flanges. On the #8 curved turnout, we actually had a couple of hi-rail cars derail, so we knocked out the wheel drop issue entirely with the moving frog. There have been a few articles on making a "flying wing" turnout and (in theory) you could make a spring frog that's closed on the normal state, but springs open when the turnout is thrown.

Matt Jackson
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Here is another version on the disused Northcliffe line down south of West Australia notice how the turnout is curved coming into the station yard and the rails and frog are worked with one lever (don't ask me how I forget!)  also a standard frog to compare, all taken in the same yard while I was on a walk in the bush. Northcliffe was a logging town once had a large sawmill and large forests and shipped endless lumber to everywhere all finished now just memories at least the pub is still there! Nice cold beer.    Roo.

 

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We got a bunch of custom  Signature Switch Co  turnouts from Brad Strong out of Utah four years ago that are very quiet.  The #8 double cross over can handle a line of cars with hardly a sound.  Same thing with a 72" radius curved ladder track.  I believe he sets the frog guard rails a tad closer than normal which extends the closure rails enough to allow  most treads to always be on a rail head. 

He made turnouts and crossings for us that fit a variety of situations.  two curves through a diamond, curved turnouts that are half straight and other unusual configurations.  Totally hand made custom fab shop.

Signature Switch Co #8 double x-over 017IMG_6927

 

"Price is what you pay - value is what you get"  Warren Buffet

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That curved turnout is nice I like it, but would never have the space for the broad curve. I have a much smaller compact one on my layout for the Republic Steel yard throat made by Marcway in England works fine, tricky to wire into a matrix board but we got there in the end. Roo

 

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No.

Ha ha, that's a great space saver I like it.

 Last year when I was in England I almost bought a four way from Marcway who makes them as a stock item.

I'm getting a headache thinking about it. If your using manual throws there won't be a problem it's when you combine three motors it gets tricky.

How much more special work have you got? I've always liked track but kept it reasonably simple on my layout only have one double slip now and the three way the rest are all single turnouts I have just installed another four turnouts and intend to change another three.  Roo.

Not mine but interesting nontheless

OP Dual gauge turnoutOP 4 diamondsMarcway two track into 3 way

 

Below is typical of Brad Strong's  build process.  He sends you a pdf of your special track work for confirmation.

Outside double slipIMG_8146

This was actually made for another forumite.

"Price is what you pay - value is what you get"  Warren Buffet

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Try 84 relays! And the rails are gapped.

And it's all DC they don't run DCC to many older locos to convert.

It's all been ballasted and finished by now next year I will be calling on them again it's a great layout. I have lots of photos of it it is very large at a private house but it's also a club with 23 members last time I was there. Roo.

 

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Roo posted:

Try 84 relays! And the rails are gapped.

And it's all DC they don't run DCC to many older locos to convert.

It's all been ballasted and finished by now next year I will be calling on them again it's a great layout. I have lots of photos of it it is very large at a private house but it's also a club with 23 members last time I was there. Roo.

 

DSC06126

Fabulous Roo, looking forward to the images from your next visit. They have some great info in the British Model Railroading magazines our local book store sells.

With complicated track work I agree but as the photos above show it can still be done in DC if you have the time and patience.

I don't agree or disagree with any form of operation for model trains and I have tried them all over the years I just happen to prefer DC with centre off control (no reversing switch) at the fascia (no hand held controllers) we actually pull all the electronic gadgets out of any locos we use and rewire them to suit our needs. But lets talk about special track work not locos. Roo.

As a DC 0 scaler i have a confession.  In the midst of the doldrums of building, building, building I got discouraged in that nothing was running.  That is when a friend suggested that I at least get one or two  RC / battery locos  and enjoy something in the meantime.  Weeeeell, i did and it felt good.  All my crazy track work, 87 turnouts, 5 lift outs, several live frog diamonds, 118 blocks,  two double scissors, unconnected drops, half wired multiple sub panels, none of it mattered.  Batt/ RC breezes over  everything.

Still wiring away, DC (&DCS) power is inching it's way thru the branch lines,  but I  wish I had gone batt/rc from the beginning.  It is so totally freeing!

"Price is what you pay - value is what you get"  Warren Buffet

This is the station entrance to Cannon Street station, London taken a while back have a look at the three way turnout leading to a dead end loco spur in the centre of the photo it's interesting.

The track work has not changed a lot in modern times the loco spurs have gone which simplifies the track work. I snapped a photo a couple of years ago. Roo.1375985_10204102983728675_1161528180576448222_nEngland 2011 243

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AGHRMatt posted:
prrhorseshoecurve posted:

IF you went with Ross Switches and/or have some Curtis Switches in the first place, You don't feel the Wheel drop at all!

Actually, in a 2-rail situation, you get wheel drop on larger frogs because of the space involved, the rail height, and the flange depth. With a larger Ross turnout, you do get some wheel drop even with hi-rail flanges and, like prototype, the flange rides on the base of the frog. We put the frog point in because some members run 2-rail cars and/or locomotives with smaller flanges. On the #8 curved turnout, we actually had a couple of hi-rail cars derail, so we knocked out the wheel drop issue entirely with the moving frog. There have been a few articles on making a "flying wing" turnout and (in theory) you could make a spring frog that's closed on the normal state, but springs open when the turnout is thrown.

On prototype railroads the outside of the flange does not ride on any surface. it make no contact with the bottom of the frog as stated. only the tread of the wheel rides on the surface of the rail head. that is only true on tinplate toy train wheels.

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