Does Greenberg's or others publish a Guide to Lionel Trains after 1991?

If you want a more detailed guide that is more than just listings and has a lot of photos and important descriptions, this guide below has always been a favorite in my library. This is a must have for anyone who collects modern Lionel:

Though David Doyle who did the very large and very impressive guides to prewar and postwar Lionel, also did this guide of Lionel from 1900-2000.

It's not nearly as detailed in descriptions as the Kughn book nor his prewar and postwar guides, but considering how much product was made in those 30 years, it's understandable. At least this one has photos for just about everything that was made.

Thomas

Somerset County 4-H Trainmasters

TCA Member11-66911

LCCA 30247

ERR Upgrades and Custom Artwork

Check out the books published by Project Roar. Their books on uncataloged sets and postwar operating cars are the best books I've seen on their respective subjects. I wish they'd do more.

They have some books at discounted prices on their website site. 

Projectroar.com 

C.W. Burfle

Thanks for the info on the train guides. 

I like the Greenberg's guides with more info on each item. 

But that Greenberg's Lionel Trains guide from 1987 to 1995 is just 4 more years than my 1970 to 1991 guide.

I was looking for more later years.  Must not be demand for later years.

Charlie

The fact is Lionel has put out so much different product in the modern era, that it's almost impossible to cover all that's been made in a detailed guide book without it being longer than War and Peace.

Thomas

Somerset County 4-H Trainmasters

TCA Member11-66911

LCCA 30247

ERR Upgrades and Custom Artwork

I've  lost touch with the fellow, but I was friendly with one of the authors of a couple of guides a ways back. He told me the cost of printing books with all those color plates was getting too expensive to continue publishing new guides. Look at what the recently published Bruce Greenbelt book cost. Did I read that the book(s) on prewar lionel O gauge is expected to be 3 volumes, with the first costing $100?

How much would anyone pay for guides on recent production, how many would buy? Maybe I am mistaken, it's my impression that most folks buying recent stuff are more interested in operating, as opposed to collecting. (As always, to each their own!)

C.W. Burfle
C W Burfle posted:

... the cost of printing books with all those color plates was getting too expensive to continue publishing new guides. ...

I've heard this from other sources (outside of train publications) as well.

E-books or a subscriber-based web site database would be the way to go, at least for modern production stuff .  Both could be easily revised and updated and would be easily searchable.  Books are best left to pre-war, postwar, and out-of-business companies, as these are less likely to need revised and updated often (except for prices) if they are properly researched, compiled, and edited before publication.  Online catalogs are OK, but they don't tell you what products actually made it to market and which were cancelled.

I think people into operating as opposed to collecting still want the information contained in these types of guides, but they want them for different reasons.  Although I do a little collecting, I am mostly an operator, and I am always stumbling on modern production items that I haven't noticed before and that strike my fancy.  A properly indexed guide would help in finding road names of interest and/or engines and rolling stock types of interest.  Prices are not as much of a concern, but they can be helpful in cases where limited production and high demand might mean we would likely have to pay more for something we want.

Andy

TCA, LRRC, LCCA, Atlas Golden Spike (Charter Member), MTHRRC, LOTS, Pittsburgh Independent Hi-Railers - "Diesels represent the job, steam represents the adventure!"

Well as you all pointed out there is not a Lionel Guide book covering later than 1995. 

So I have found a source of information on Lionel trains latter than that - Lionel Train catalogs.  One can get them from your local train dealer.  I pick up some at train shows, often a year or two older, left by dealers or by others who no longer need them.

I have Lionel year 2000, 2003, 2005, 2007 ,2013 and some 2016.  Some later years are smaller and specialize at Ready to Run or Christmas, etc.  Also have a couple K-line and MTH and American Flyer.  These all have better pictures  than the guides and similar descriptions and even the list prices.

It is not necessary to have every year, just every few years to keep current.

Best of all these are FREE.

Charlie

Lol, imagine using catalogs as a source of information!....But that is exactly what people did before the guides came into existence. Plus old advertisements, and any company paperwork that might be available. Plus networking with others who share similar interests, with or without the TCA.

Anybody remember the Ladd checklists?

C.W. Burfle
hobby-go-lucky posted:

Using catalogs as guides works, but sometimes product appearing in catalogs differs from the catalog specs and illustrations or is never manufactured.

I can't say for certain how good the more recent Greenberg price guides are in this regard, but they used to have an entry for not made (NM) or something like that.  (though it's possible I'm thinking the terminology from when Tom McComas still did price guides - I'm pretty sure Greenberg has some sort of annotation for this)

It's a possible clue to help with that even if not always a 100% verification.  It's better than guessing or asking 50 different people who may not remember whatever item you are interested in.

Been looking for a Lionel Steam Service Siding Accessory from I think 1998 for almost 20 years now.  Also an Amtrak  Talgo Train.    (kidding - both are items that were never made)

-Dave

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