I put the engine on the tracks, power up, and throttle up.  If it runs long hood forward, I figure it was meant to.   However, many of the better models do have the F to indicate the front.

The Lionel PRR GP7 and Trainmaster are long hood forward, but the reading GP7 and GP7 as well as their Trainmaster are short hood forward.  The giant clue, other then the F, is the engineer is also facing that way.

gunrunnerjohn posted:

I put the engine on the tracks, power up, and throttle up.  If it runs long hood forward, I figure it was meant to.   However, many of the better models do have the F to indicate the front.

The Lionel PRR GP7 and Trainmaster are long hood forward, but the reading GP7 and GP7 as well as their Trainmaster are short hood forward.  The giant clue, other then the F, is the engineer is also facing that way.

Finally a voice of reason.  This discussion is somewhat moot.  That is in that the toy train makers/suppliers baked this decision into the product.  

And yes we can switch the wiring for the motors to get the engine to run in the other direction.  But we would also switch the marker/class light wires and also the coupler wires which can be done.

Here are some of my diesels that for the most part were in fact made to conform to their prototype.

Lionel Hi-nose GP30's Southern and N&W:

Southern for the most part ran short hood forward.

 IMG_3766 enlarged

N&W for most part long hood forward.

IMG_3830

MTH Southern SD45's long hood forward and they LOOK great.

IMG_1740

MTH second generation tooling Southern and Pennsy Train Masters.

IMG_1986

IMG_1978

But more important here are the pilot deck heights.  Southern  require a lower (step-down).

IMG_1981

Ron

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If you take into account the sharper radii of most track plans, toy trains that is, running long hood forward would severely limit the engineer's view on curves.....LOL

Dan Padova

 

"In the course of my life I have had to eat my words, and I must confess it was a wholesome diet"..........Winston Churchill

                                                                                                                                        

Chuck Sartor posted:

For locomotives that have duel control stands, which end is front?

Just taking a semi-edumicated guess here, but probably whichever end the receiving railroad requested it on, when they ordered the loco.

Or, if the railroad itself installed a dual control stand on an existing unit, the "F" end was probably left as it already was.

Paul  

Ship Rock Island ROCKET FREIGHT

 

2 Rails?  3 Rails?  Doesn't matter, I can't count that high anyway.

I love the smell of fresh-brewed creosote first thing in the morning.

Train Nut posted:

Always having switching layouts, it really doesn't matter to me. The engines go on the track however I put them. And depending upon where the train is going or what I am switching determines whether it's long or short its long or short hood forward.

Yup, that's purty much the way the real railroads do it on their switching layouts, too!  

Paul  

Ship Rock Island ROCKET FREIGHT

 

2 Rails?  3 Rails?  Doesn't matter, I can't count that high anyway.

I love the smell of fresh-brewed creosote first thing in the morning.

I run mine long hood forward. As someone else pointed out this was the designated direction used by the Great Northern and SP&S. I remember reading that this was the preferred orientation by both the Railroad and the crews. The reason given for the long hood forward orientation was crew safety in the event of a grade crossing accident. Crews liked having that long hood between them and any vehicles that might be on the tracks.

Mixed Freight posted:
Chuck Sartor posted:

For locomotives that have duel control stands, which end is front?

Just taking a semi-edumicated guess here, but probably whichever end the receiving railroad requested it on, when they ordered the loco.

Or, if the railroad itself installed a dual control stand on an existing unit, the "F" end was probably left as it already was.

In the real world, using the stenciled F as forward was mandatory.  When a man on the ground was passing signals to the engineer to go forward or back up, he went by the F.  Didn't matter if there were dual control stands or if it was in the middle.  The man on the ground went by the defined front of the engine.

Rusty Traque posted:
Chuck Sartor posted:

For locomotives that have duel control stands, which end is front?

The end as specified by the railroad.

Even dual cab electric locomotives like the EP5 and GG1 have a designated front.  It's there if you look closely:

GE EP5 NH 379

 

Rusty

A detail K-Line left-off their model of the EP5.

IMG_5295

Ron

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mlaughlinnyc posted:
In the real world, using the stenciled F as forward was mandatory.  When a man on the ground was passing signals to the engineer to go forward or back up, he went by the F.  Didn't matter if there were dual control stands or if it was in the middle.  The man on the ground went by the defined front of the engine.

It also came in handy when the engine crew had to describe a problem to the shop personnel, especially if the problem was located at one end or the other.

Paul  

Ship Rock Island ROCKET FREIGHT

 

2 Rails?  3 Rails?  Doesn't matter, I can't count that high anyway.

I love the smell of fresh-brewed creosote first thing in the morning.

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