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@pdxtrains posted:

I’m a lunar observer too and used to have gigantic telescopes. Gone now. I’m happily observing with 60 to 80 mm scopes, that I can pick up with one hand and be set up in seconds. Trying to keep it simple all the way around.

I used to have an 8" F/8 Newtonian but now I use a 6" F/5 RFT but I still miss the big scope. I've recently begun to look into building a 16" F/6 but telescope building doesn't seem as popular as it used to be and parts are harder to find. Like model railroading ready to use out of the box seems to be the norm and us old timey crafts people are a dying breed regardless of what the hobby or project is. I know people half my age who will call an electrician to replace a switch or an outlet or buy whole new faucet and have it installed by a plumber because the one they have drips because they are clueless about how to fix it and I learned how to do it when I was 12 years old going out for my Home Repairs merit badge.



Jerry

Howdy,

I'm wondering if I could apply to join this forum group? I sort of fit the requirements but do hang out in a few areas too. A recap shows the following: My trolley layout is 30" deep by 72" long. I put up a Christmas layout on a 30" by 72" table. Now, the other O gauge layout is 14' by 8.5' and disqualifies me. sob.......... A video of Trolley Park taken today is attached. The one video I took of the Christmas train layout used the I-phone in vertical mode so that won't be posted............ peace and Train and Traction ON! Please review and let me know.

Jim K



Bogart your traction layouts catenary alone gets you in! 30x72 easily works for us as does the Christmas layout, Welcome Aboard!

You'll have to give us some insights in how you built the overhead, this weeks layout plan just screams traction and overhead wires would just be the icing on the cake!

ORIGINAL PLAN

ALTERNATE UNIVERSE PLAN

48411c

I'm actually debating building this one.



1. BYIENGST
2. Whit M
3. GMan-24
4. Engineer Bob
5. lehighline
6. Eric in Houston
7. Scott R
8. Craftech
9. Brian Defazio
10. John SW
11. Bogart



So once again welcome and feel free to kick in with any ideas or suggestions, we all have a few tricks up our sleeves when it comes to making a small layout seem a lot more interesting than most would think possible. We could become the repository of small layout designs, ideas and problem solving.



Jerry

Jerry,

Thank you for the warm welcome and accepting me into the group! I hope to attach some photos of the early days at Trolley Park. I had to go back and look for these photos and learned that I have been working on the park since about 2015. There was a year prior to that when I was working on building those brass poles to hold the overhead. I got a dozen of the them from Jim Rivers and proceeded to solder little fittings etc. At the time I had no idea of just what I was going to do with them. Then slowly my OCD took over and I was reading and pursuing a lot of information on traction systems. With my limited space and 027 turns I had created a bit of a monster for hanging the overhead. The last photo shows my technique for installing the Lionel animated accessories. I cut out the 1/2" homosote from the top of the table and dropped the units in. Then I could use Sculp-ta-mold (spelling = wrong) to blend them into the rest of the table. Now if any of those units fail, it is get our a knife and hammer and have at it.  Anyhow for consideration:

trolleypark1trolleypark2trolleypark3trolleypark5

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Thanks for the info Jim I have been looking at building a catenary and when I saw your suspension system and wondered about the single wire. I assumed it was not powered.

Is there some type of sheave on the trolley pole which keeps it on the wire.  I seem to remember those poles "popping" (coming off the overhead wire) and then dropping down to the top of the car. 

Since the last trolley ran in June 1958, while I was on this planet at the time, I cannot image forming that clear a memory at that age. Wow, the interweb is a great thing. It happens I was remembering "trolley buses". They used overhead power but did not rely on rails running instead on tires. Whether you call them trolley buses, trolley coaches, or trackless trolleys, rubber-tired buses with overhead wires were used in Chicago from 1930 to 1973 and were very  popular. 

https://thetrolleydodger.com/2...toric-chicago-buses/

Case solved

@ScoutingDad posted:
They used overhead power but did not rely on rails running instead on tires. Whether you call them trolley buses, trolley coaches, or trackless trolleys, rubber-tired buses with overhead wires were used in Chicago from 1930 to 1973 and were very  popular.

I saw these at a York several years ago and always hoped someone would offer an O gauge version:

trol2

trol1



The trolley poles followed the wires and swiveled the wheels left or right as it moved along following the wires overhead.



Jerry

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I'm actually working on a catenary concept using brass rods and Lionel gi-raffe poles...

GEDC2220

Mitch

Looking forward to seeing the end results .  I’ve always loved seeing toy trains running off a live catenary system. So much so that I too made my own for my O gauge Bowser trolley  using a combination of All-thread and Marklin HO catenary stamped wire .  That 4x8 set ran flawlessly I’m happy to report .  Then I made another working catenary system for my standard gauge kitbashed MU cars . It too worked as planned .  The top photo shows the Marklin wire and the bottom photo shows the system I cobbled together for the standard gauge using shelving supports.  I used the wall brackets for the poles , angle brackets to hold the poles to the layout , self supports for the messenger arms and for the wire I used inverted rails from old track I disassembled.  Fun projects! 05E3E726-E866-470C-B07F-817A2027222DD66116A4-DDD1-40CC-9279-0910BD1D70F9

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  • 05E3E726-E866-470C-B07F-817A2027222D
  • D66116A4-DDD1-40CC-9279-0910BD1D70F9

Looking forward to seeing the end results .  I’ve always loved seeing toy trains running off a live catenary system. So much so that I too made my own for my O gauge Bowser trolley  using a combination of All-thread and Marklin HO catenary stamped wire .  That 4x8 set ran flawlessly I’m happy to report .

My plan involves suspending Marklin catenary from the gi-raffe poles; should prove interesting.  ;-)

Mitch

@ScoutingDad posted:

Thanks for the info Jim I have been looking at building a catenary and when I saw your suspension system and wondered about the single wire. I assumed it was not powered.

Is there some type of sheave on the trolley pole which keeps it on the wire.  I seem to remember those poles "popping" (coming off the overhead wire) and then dropping down to the top of the car.

Since the last trolley ran in June 1958, while I was on this planet at the time, I cannot image forming that clear a memory at that age. Wow, the interweb is a great thing. It happens I was remembering "trolley buses". They used overhead power but did not rely on rails running instead on tires. Whether you call them trolley buses, trolley coaches, or trackless trolleys, rubber-tired buses with overhead wires were used in Chicago from 1930 to 1973 and were very  popular.

https://thetrolleydodger.com/2...toric-chicago-buses/

Case solved

Howdy again,

The trolley you see in my first video has not been converted to use the overhead wire. The video in this message shows a unit that is running from the overhead. I have put a selector switch on two of my units that allows for selecting use of the center rail or the overhead. A friend who knew I was working on the Labelle kits said I really should do that. I am glad he did. The connection to the overhead wire cab either be a slider or a wheel. I use wheels. They need to be carefully cleaned every once in a while as they are connecting to power and will get just as dirty as the wheels on locomotives.

Train ON!

Jim K

Seems like small layouts tend to be a haven for traction, makes sense, smaller layouts benefit from smaller radius curves and shorter motive power. From what I've seen tho there doesn't seem to be much in the way of S gauge traction. Pity, because this weeks layout plan is an S gauge American Flyer design. I never designed one in S and quickly found out that the track selection I had to use was not as large as what I was used to in O but I persevered and came up with the following design using AF track:

48418AF

It's a 4 1/2' x 7' layout that uses stock pieces of track so no cutting of track is involved...

woo

But the plywood does need to be cut as follows...

48418AFcuts

And re-arranged to make the 4.5x7 table...

48418AFcuts2

The track required for this is:

17 - 20" curves

14 - 10" straights

3 - LH switches

2 - RH switches

1 - Bumper

Like I've said I've never set up AF before and I wish I had the space and resources to actually set up each of these I design. I've always been a "hands on ' designer and I get a much better feel for a design if I can actually see it and fidget with it as I go. Many times I'll find out what looks good on paper just doesn't seem right when I start laying track and will start moving things around in a "What if I..." modus operandi, heck I've done that to set ups that looked just fine just to spitball an idea.

I've recently came into possesion of 5 packs of Life-Likes old style mountain paper and even tho I know the display layouts built by Lionel and American Flyer didn't use it they are just calling out to be used on a display type of layout.

Next on my hunt are the old Skyline building kits, I'm looking to go old school on a door layout!



Jerry

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The photo of the package of mountain paper brought back memories of the layout my sons and I enjoyed back in the late 70's.  I remember going on a crusade seeking the Life Like sparkle  mountain paper for our rather sizeable layout. Even then it was out of production, replaced by a brown and green version.  I managed to find some of the original paper in old hardware stores, but not enough to finish the layout.  I liked the old paper for its nostalgic appearance.  I ended up creating my own with brown wrapping paper and spray paints.  I must say I did a pretty good  job of it.   

That layout got plenty of use over the years and was a source of pride. We enjoyed inviting friends over to see it.  One family in particular became O gauge friends and remain so to this day. Both families are now members of a modular club.  Thanks for sharing.

Earl       

     

The photo of the package of mountain paper brought back memories of the layout my sons and I enjoyed back in the late 70's.  I remember going on a crusade seeking the Life Like sparkle  mountain paper for our rather sizeable layout.

 

It seems to show up in spurts on Ebay, I scored all five in about a three weeks time frame about a month ago, but before that nothing since 2019 and none since. I've never seen it a train show oddly enough even tho old Christmas stuff always seems to be there all the time. I actually bought my first roll with the plan to make my own but finding mica powder in the proper size and color isn't easy or cheap, I have paper of about the right weight, I've matched paint colors at Walmart ($8 a quart) and am going to used diluted wall paper past as a glue at $10 a gallon but a 4OZ jar of Eye Candy Icicle mica powder (about the size of a small jar of Noxema) ran me $24.

I've always liked the old style stuff, the newer colors and no sparkle just don't do it for me, must be in my genetics, my grandfather used it back in the fiftys as did my dad but by the time I had taken over the mantle of Christmas Garden Guardian it was no longer available. Interestingly he only used it in the corners of his layouts, the main tunnel was plaster covered chicken wire.

decker1

I've managed to track down just about every one of the Skyline buildings Grandpa used so I can recreate them except that Spanish style one in the left back, I don't think it was a Skyline. I have the Plasticville he had and have recreated his operating water tower and we still have the cast iron tree stand he painted in what is a surprisingly similar style of Bob Ross. That picture is from the early 50s and I still have those trains and they still run and at some point I want to rebuild it as exactly as I can.



Jerry

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  • decker1

Where did you get it done? Vistaprint didn't have the option for a wraparound background.

Jerry

Collage.com    i had a “freebie” coupon.  Although somehow i messed up the order; only got the black background wrapped half way around.  You can get a complete black wraparound background.  Was also considering a bigger mug to try and make the small print below be bigger.

The new layout is up and running. Nothing fancy, a standard two loop arrangement with an 036 inner loop, 048 for the outer, and 072 switches. It's my first use of Fastrack and the first time I've attempted to build a clean base in preparation for a little scenery. I stapled and old wool blanket to the table and covered it with dark green mat board. the seams are taped together from behind, which mostly worked; you can see a few spots that didn't stick. The blanket is surprisingly effective at keeping the noise down.  I've also included a picture of the underside: I usd 3/4" pvc pipe scraps for conduit to keep the wires together, and attached the sawhorses to the table with piano hinges, so they can stay attached and swing into place when the table is set up. Works better than I expected! I have one very fussy engine which compelled me to make some modifications to the switches; more about that later.  This is as far as I'll go for the moment; the table is now about as heavy as I can manage without it getting away from me, so scenery will all need to be removeable. Still having fun, so there will be more to come.

Layout20Apr2021

LayoutStore20Apr2021

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  • Layout20Apr2021
  • LayoutStore20Apr2021
@PRRMP54 posted:

I really like the water tank.

Family legend has it it was built using a Pablum box and the coil from a doorbell. I don't ever remember seeing the inside but I built one for my layout using the measurements from one my uncle had built. He read me the measurements over the phone on Thanksgiving day and in a week I had built one of my own using 1/4" luan, 1/2x3/4 pine strips from Hechingers, poster board, a 1/4" dowel for the spout and I wound my own coil. It was almost an exact copy of my grandfathers including the green sawdust I sprinkled on the wet paint on its base and the distinctive "clunk/buzz" of the coil activating. I never got around to building the station platform he had built (the long red structure in the back) but it is on my to build list but I'll be using commercially available wood, I can't get an orange crate like he used.



Jerry

Last edited by baltimoretrainworks

Hello all,

I'm looking for some track plans for a 4X6 or 4X8 plywood sheet, in O gauge. I'm very limited on space for a layout and I need some professional help on limited space for track planning. This is my first layout and I hope that it'll turn out to be a good one. I thank you all in advance and hope to hear back from you soon.

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OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
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