These arrived today. Thought I would share some pictures.

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Overall I think they look fine. Standard heavy 40' flat with balsa wood top. The tanks are plastic and nothing moves. But I think they are okay

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They come with 4 balsa wood blocks with double sided tape - I have not installed them.

The holes in the flat could take chain as they go all the way through.

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Maybe some black paint on the frame behind the wheels. Again maybe this is correct - will again have to look through some books.

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Overall I like them. Need to add some chains maybe - have to study that. The only thing I see wrong with the UP version is the built date on the flat 1951 oops. I am sure a few Sherman's were around then. But I was thinking WWII era. Personally these plastic tanks are pretty good. I have some metal ones I bought years ago but can't get to them to compare right now.

Joe

Home of the Texarkana & East Texas Railroad (Cotton Belt,

Texas & Pacific, MoPac, KCS, and T&NO)

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Blue Streak posted:

These arrived today. Thought I would share some pictures.

IMG_0740

Overall I think they look fine. Standard heavy 40' flat with balsa wood top. The tanks are plastic and nothing moves. But I think they are okay

They come with 4 balsa wood blocks with double sided tape - I have not installed them.

The holes in the flat could take chain as they go all the way through.

Maybe some black paint on the frame behind the wheels. Again maybe this is correct - will again have to look through some books.

Overall I like them. Need to add some chains maybe - have to study that. The only thing I see wrong with the UP version is the built date on the flat 1951 oops. I am sure a few Sherman's were around then. But I was thinking WWII era. Personally these plastic tanks are pretty good. I have some metal ones I bought years ago but can't get to them to compare right now.

Joe

Pretty good, reasonable representation of an early production Sherman army tank.  It's highly possible and altogether every bit probable that Sherman's were transported to various Army bases in the early '50s for training exercises and/or oversea's deployment.

After all, I'm pretty sure that the U.P. still transports big fleets of kick-*** army tanks on flatcars to this day from an Army base in my neck of the woods.   

Paul  

Ship Rock Island ROCKET FREIGHT

 

2 Rails?  3 Rails?  Doesn't matter, I can't count that high in either case.

I love the smell of fresh-brewed creosote first thing in the morning.

If the government knew how much fun O-gauge railroading was, they'd outlaw it!

Common sense is my second best trait.  Nonsense is my first, of course. 

The sides of the hull of the tank should be green, but, if you want to improve the realism just a bit, paint the tires of the 6 lower tank wheels (boogies) black or dark gray.  they were covered in a rubber compound.  Also true of the three upper ones, but you can barely see those.

Frisco, MoPac, and T&P near Rolla, MO

The Date of 1951 for the Up Flat would put the transport of Sherman tank during the Korean War . 

some weathering of the Tank might look more realistic 

if the barrel is solid at the end , you might drill it out a little .  

This is my 2 cents 

 

Dominic,

All the pictures I have seen regarding the WWII era tanks, jeeps, etc were transported on Railroad Company's flatcars (SP, Pennsylvania, UP, etc). I don't think those Army flatcars existed until later like the 60's or 70's - maybe later than that. I could be wrong but that is what I remember when I checked into what to order. I can't get to my books at the moment to verify.

Home of the Texarkana & East Texas Railroad (Cotton Belt,

Texas & Pacific, MoPac, KCS, and T&NO)

Mine arrived today.  I like the flatcar but the Sherman  is just a toss on my eyes, I will get others to replace them.  They have tracks inside the sprockets that drive them looks like no effort was out into the tank.  They sure didn’t try on the Sherman, thumbs down on the price of this one.

 

Blue Streak posted:

Dominic,

All the pictures I have seen regarding the WWII era tanks, jeeps, etc were transported on Railroad Company's flatcars (SP, Pennsylvania, UP, etc). I don't think those Army flatcars existed until later like the 60's or 70's - maybe later than that. I could be wrong but that is what I remember when I checked into what to order. I can't get to my books at the moment to verify.

The military would indeed use whatever railroad which had equipment available during WWII.  I highly recommend Trains to Victory: America's Railroads in WWII by Heimburger and Kelly.

-Greg

 

Member of the Brotherhood of the Crappy Basement Layout

Associate Member of the NJ Hi-Railers

Image result for nj hirailers logo

 

I have a collection of WWII military train transports.  I will also run same vintage coal hoppers and boxcars.  Getting the train car built dates to be of the proper vintage is a little OCD ( or rather CDO - alphabetically correct as it should be) thing of mine.  It's all too easy to have rolling stock built dates after the war, but I avoid those.  These can be had however.

A little peeve of mine is that the train catalogs should show the "built date", but they don't.

I have picked up some Menards military rolling stock.  They have scale flatcars which helps.  Some of their loads are really cool (but not all of them realistic).  Their jeeps are great.   However they say built by Menards and the current year stamp.  How do I live with this?  I turn off my OCD switch and just enjoy their fun value and low, low prices.  In actuality, when they're running I can only read the built date if I run along side of them.  Given the pony/slant walls in my train room I would be banging my head at least twice for each loop of the layout.  I've tried squinting a lot, but blurring out the rest of the layout in order not to see the built dates seems to be somewhat self defeating.  I've thought about putting little American flag stickers over the Menards/built date, but it's hard to come up with 48 star flags.  (And, anyway, it seems risky in that it might destroy its collector value (you see, in 20 years they could be worth $5.00)).

So anyway, I fight the evil Axis powers with the best rolling stock I can.  I don't worry too much, for you see, I know how it turns out.

I wonder if any Japanese modelers ever model post bomb Hiroshima?

Alan

At over $100 a piece for these flatcars. You think Lionel would have supplied a nicer tank instead of one that looks like it came out of a dollar store toy bin.

For the money. I'd be looking at the Mth versions or buy one of the previous run flat cars and grab the corgi tank off of eBay.

 

" No matter how far we travel, the memories will follow in the baggage car."

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