I already have one.

I just take out that cutoff wheel and put one of these in.

Gets the wheels clean in a jiffy.  For locomotives, I flop them on their back and run them to clean the powered wheels.

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gunrunnerjohn posted:

I already have one.

I just take out that cutoff wheel and put one of these in.

Gets the wheels clean in a jiffy.  For locomotives, I flop them on their back and run them to clean the powered wheels.

Locomotives are easy, but cars not to much.  Car wheels need to be held stationary for friction to applied.  a Dremel would just spin the wheel.

Actually, they're VERY easy.  I want the wheel to spin, and all I so is put my finger on the opposite wheel lightly to slow it down some and the wire wheel does it's thing.  It's even easier to do than to describe, and it only took one sentence to describe it.   I can knock out a wheel cleaning on a car in a flash, and they're whistle clean.

gunrunnerjohn posted:

Actually, they're VERY easy.  I want the wheel to spin, and all I so is put my finger on the opposite wheel lightly to slow it down some and the wire wheel does it's thing.  It's even easier to do than to describe, and it only took one sentence to describe it.   I can knock out a wheel cleaning on a car in a flash, and they're whistle clean.

Aren't you afraid the wire is too abrasive vs a wet cotton swab? 

GRJ and others -- Could you describe how and what you do to power the engine while it is upside down in the locomotive cradle?  I am a novice and have not powered a locomotive except on the track.  Also to repeat what Ponz said -- isn't the Dremel wire brush abrasive?   Thank you.

By the way GRJ, your layout build is amazing.

pferddy posted:

GRJ and others -- Could you describe how and what you do to power the engine while it is upside down in the locomotive cradle?  I am a novice and have not powered a locomotive except on the track.  Also to repeat what Ponz said -- isn't the Dremel wire brush abrasive?   Thank you.

By the way GRJ, your layout build is amazing.

You can power the engine with a couple of leads from the transformer - which I do.  I go through a ton of Q-tips & alcohol.

I power it with test leads, and I've never found that the wire brush damages any wheels.  FWIW, I don't use them on the wheels with traction tires.   I've done this for years, and no wheels have been harmed in the cleaning process.  After all, you run for hours with those wheels on steel track, aren't you afraid it'll damage the wheels?

pferddy posted:

By the way GRJ, your layout build is amazing.

Thanks, it's been quite a journey, and it's not over yet!

pferddy posted:

GRJ and others -- Could you describe how and what you do to power the engine while it is upside down in the locomotive cradle?  I am a novice and have not powered a locomotive except on the track.  Also to repeat what Ponz said -- isn't the Dremel wire brush abrasive?   Thank you.

By the way GRJ, your layout build is amazing.

Wire.l brush won’t hurt a thing just be careful around your white walls.   I also take my traction tires off and clean them with dawn.   Powering the loco is easy I usually connect the tender also so I can run the unit while cleaning the wheels.   Just get a couple mini jumper cables basically.   Walmart has them and I know the auto stores.   It’s an alligator clip on the each end of I believe #12 wire.   Hit one to a roller and the other to a ground and your in business

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In my world there is a cold beer and vision big boy for everyone.

I'd never recommend taking traction tires off once they're installed.  The extra stretching just hastens the day when they'll fall off on their own.  I can't imagine needing to clean the traction tires that thoroughly.  I agree with the whitewalls, if the wire brush is off the rim, you're doing it wrong.

Also like John with use of the dremel and never have hurt a wheel. There have been on occasion a online purchase where the wheels have a cake of hardened grease then i turn wheel slowly  and use a single edge razor and it comes off very well followed by dremel use.

 

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On small prewar electrics (248, 150 and 250 series is all I do is turn the loco upside down and power it up using alligator test cables. Then I hold  piece of Scotch Bite on the wheels, cleans them up and there is basically no residue. On the smaller wheels I do what is described above taken them apart uninhabited it’s axle and holding then against a drill press mounted wire wheel.

I also would wipe them down with the 90% alcahole or any other type of solvent like lacquer thinner, acitone. Just have to make sure that the solvent you are using will not affect paint or plastics. Alway’s re-lube after a solvent is used.

Haven’t done wheels with traction tire, but If I did I would just work around them and do the others.

RonH

Don't Junk it, Make it Work!

 

Dieseler posted:

There have been on occasion a online purchase where the wheels have a cake of hardened grease then i turn wheel slowly  and use a single edge razor and it comes off very well followed by dremel use.

I use a flat screwdriver to "scrape" off the accumulated "gunk" for wheels like that and then use the wire wheel.  It's amazing what you can find on some cars, you have to wonder how long they ran without cleaning the wheels.

I was at Henning’s yesterday, unfortunately I can’t recall the company that sells it, but they have one. 

Ive copied @gunrunnerjohn ‘a method. But I didn’t buy a dremel, I use a “pedi-paws”(dog nail trimmer/sander) that we don’t use for our dog. It’s essentially the same thing as the dremel, I cut out, after doing measurements, and attached 3 small scotchbrites to it. It’s worked great.

that said, me being an idiot, I was so excited to use this tool which makes things clean up SO much quicker, I didn’t think to put on safety glasses. Long story short, between that and over use of contacts, I have an infectious corneal ulcer. So make sure you wear safety glasses. 

tldr: A pedipaws May be cheaper, is the same as a dremel in terms of rigging it to clean wheels, and make sure you wear safety glasses 

StevefromPA posted:
that said, me being an idiot, I was so excited to use this tool which makes things clean up SO much quicker, I didn’t think to put on safety glasses. Long story short, between that and over use of contacts, I have an infectious corneal ulcer. So make sure you wear safety glasses.

Yikes!   That doesn't sound fun at all!

I would advise to be very careful, when running a steam engine up side down, to clean the wheels. Some linkage designs will bend or lock up the wheels, which could fry the board. I usually use a clean Q-Tip to reach between the chassis and the shell to rotate the fly wheel and re-position the drivers for cleaning.

Dave Z

I remember Marty Fitzhenry mentioned there was one model that had a problem running upside down, so this is a good thing to keep in mind Dave.  Apparently, I haven't run across this model yet as I haven't had a problem so far.

Dave Zucal posted:

I would advise to be very careful, when running a steam engine up side down, to clean the wheels. Some linkage designs will bend or lock up the wheels, which could fry the board. I usually use a clean Q-Tip to reach between the chassis and the shell to rotate the fly wheel and re-position the drivers for cleaning.

The locos that I mentioned by running upside down are the per ware electric loco's 150 series. 250 series and the 240. all of which do not have linkages or a early e-units that works on gravity.
You just have to use common sense on what you on the loco you are working with.

RonH

Don't Junk it, Make it Work!

 

Not sure if I missed it or someone hasn't mentioned it yet but I would put a brass wire brush instead of the steel wire.  It is more gentle on the metal and shouldn't harm the wheels.  Good Idea on using the pedi-paws grinder.

JEM

sptrainnut

TCA 12-67009

 

J. Motts posted:

Not sure if I missed it or someone hasn't mentioned it yet but I would put a brass wire brush instead of the steel wire.  It is more gentle on the metal and shouldn't harm the wheels.  Good Idea on using the pedi-paws grinder.

The brass wheel is a good idea as the steel brush wheel will score the metal that you are , but be careful when buying them as some are just a brass color but are actually steel. 

I do like gunnrunnerjon's idea cutting the scotch bright and using them on a mandrel for a Dremmel or a Drill press.

RonH

Don't Junk it, Make it Work!

 

The tool I saw at Henning’s looked like a shoe cleaner/ brush(see pic below) but with metal wire and banana jacks that ran off track power or a transformer.

@gunrunnerjohn to put it mildly- the corneal ulcer uses words I can’t use here ha(have to laugh a little). Also I was hoping to see or meet you at Henning’s when I was there- I was there Friday night. I spoke with Walt, whom i’ve met before, didn’t know the other gentlemen there but he gave me a deal on a  used PH-1 brick.

Regarding the ulcer, I’ve had 3 kidney stones(the words to describe that wouldn’t be appropriate for this forum) but at points and this corneal ulcer felt worse than broken bones and just behind the stones. Getting better, though and thankfully it was on my iris and not my pupil or I’d likely have permanent complete vision loss instead of temporary Or permanent(tbd) impaired vision in that eye(my baseline before this was 20/400).

@banjoflyer optometrist has referred to it  as “Infectious Infiltrate” which could also be a sweet band name lol.

 

Steve, I hear that serious eye injuries or infections can be some of the most painful and annoying injuries going.  I once had a sliver of metal in my eye, that was pretty screaming painful, but once it was out the eye healed quickly and all was well.  I hope you recover quickly and don't have permanent vision issues.

StevefromPA posted:

The tool I saw at Henning’s looked like a shoe cleaner/ brush(see pic below) but with metal wire and banana jacks that ran off track power or a transformer.

 I have no idea what tool you saw, I've never seen that at Henning's.

gunrunnerjohn posted:

Steve, I hear that serious eye injuries or infections can be some of the most painful and annoying injuries going.  I once had a sliver of metal in my eye, that was pretty screaming painful, but once it was out the eye healed quickly and all was well.  I hope you recover quickly and don't have permanent vision issues.

StevefromPA posted:

The tool I saw at Henning’s looked like a shoe cleaner/ brush(see pic below) but with metal wire and banana jacks that ran off track power or a transformer.

 I have no idea what tool you saw, I've never seen that at Henning's.

Thanks for the well wishes @gunrunnerjohn ! I really appreciate it. And you’re right, it can be excruciating but that’s passed now and I’m at least healing. Again, thank you for your kindness it means really than you think.

Now- I assume you work at Henning’s judging by your signature. Was hoping I’d run into you there. The item of wish I speak isn’t very large, in fact, it looks a lot like the item below(gold colored bristles, doesn’t have a red case but a wooden-or wood look a like- to which the bristles are attached ).

https://www.micromark.com/Stan...DEAQYBiABEgLEUfD_BwE

If I recall correctly, has two banana jacks or plugs That run on track power or via transformer. It’s location in the store is either1.) on the opposite side of the magazine/book/DVD stand by where you can buy washers and more for trAins, so on the bottom left portion of the rack, if your back faces the pre-owned room’s layout facing the room with the new items2.) if your back is to the preowned area’s layout facing straight into the room with new stock, it’s possibly on one of those rectangular racks between  that layout and the magazines that are in boxes that Henning’s generously offers for in-store customers(they keep me entertained for weeks ha). I actually almost bought it. 

I m in the store once or twice a week, but I don't work there all the time.  I do the repairs and upgrades at my shop, and of course the products I sell through Henning's are also produced here.  That must be an HO item from the description, probably why I haven't seen it.

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