Sporty paint jobs

Originally Posted by phill:

I found some of this guys  work https://www.google.com/search?...3D63715%3B1830%3B850 

DOG, didn't know it had such a big address.

Phill

 

My alter-ego is the Self-Appointed Information Minister of the Isle of Denial where the flags never fell. That is the work of OGR Forum member Frank Swafford. Although he has never sought the position, we've appointed him the "Official" Minister of Paint Schemes.

Matt Jackson
"The best service you can provide for the hobby is to pass on what you have learned."

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Matt, I remember Swafford from the Atlas forum days. This is a good forum as it is like visiting an O scale hobby shop for which we have none too locally.  One can see peoples models, learn a bit, and catch up on what is happening in the hobby.

 

Phil

Phill, 2 raill

For myself, in the fictitious category, I like the 767 and 777 from the movie Unstoppable. I guess the movie wasn't a big enough hit, like the Polar Express, for Lionel to produce these.

I need to find a good painter who would be capable of doing these for me. Any suggestions?

unstoppable 767unstoppable 777 

Dave Z

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My first attempt at what I would call a complex paint job was a Max Gray Daylight Northern.  I don't seem to have a shot handy, so accept this one -  a Lobaugh Pacific with scratch tender.  The silver stripes are done with a pen.

2484

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Great Northern E7One of my favorites is this cast brass beauty: again a pen was used for the stripes, but yellow always needs white underneath, so this one was a two-step process.  Decals were custom made.  The baggage car is a wood block.  Adams mechanisms, but only five axles are powered.  We are still looking for replacement gearing.

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I'd say this one is sporty if one considers all the performance enhancement supplements that today's professional athletes use.

_IGP0659IMGP9654IMGP9655

Jonathan Peiffer

Modeling the NY&LB in Arizona

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Can't tell you why, but this is about the most unusual paint scheme I've seen on a switcher and I like it.  At certain angles in videos it almost looks like a cartoon dog with half open sleepy eyes, hands folded over the chest (pilot) and big toothless grin. 

Related image

BH

Dave Zucal posted:

For myself, in the fictitious category, I like the 767 and 777 from the movie Unstoppable. I guess the movie wasn't a big enough hit, like the Polar Express, for Lionel to produce these.

I need to find a good painter who would be capable of doing these for me. Any suggestions?

unstoppable 777 

I'm with you, Dave! They would have been fine models for MTH or Lionel to make. Folks, including many active in the hobby, really like colorful paint schemes (and there's no denying that there are actual prototypes for these).

Thanks Allen. I'm sure the manufactures would shy away from the legal hoops that they would have to jump through in order to do it. The movie company would probably expect royalties for each unit sold. I would love seeing this scheme on my layout, but the cost is very high to have a shell professionally done. Knowing my luck, they would appear on the market a few months after shelling out the cash to do it.  

Dave Z

Dave Zucal posted:

For myself, in the fictitious category, I like the 767 and 777 from the movie Unstoppable. I guess the movie wasn't a big enough hit, like the Polar Express, for Lionel to produce these.

I need to find a good painter who would be capable of doing these for me. Any suggestions?

unstoppable 767unstoppable 777 

Movie made almost $168 million. I would say when it comes to train movies it did pretty good. Someone needs to make these. 

aaastopDave Zucal posted:

Thanks Allen. I'm sure the manufactures would shy away from the legal hoops that they would have to jump through in order to do it. The movie company would probably expect royalties for each unit sold. I would love seeing this scheme on my layout, but the cost is very high to have a shell professionally done. Knowing my luck, they would appear on the market a few months after shelling out the cash to do it.  

The price is not high , it is a very complex process to do correct . Laying out the art work for starters which would involve having the locomotive to measure and make paper layout of stripes to see how to correctly get them on in the right place and proportions ,size up the lettering of the side emblem ,  a trial and error process .To do that you would need a lot of photos and research to actually do the decals , I am sure that would take 2 or 3 minutes tops . Now lets get into prepping the body for painting , take the locomotive apart  ,then reassemble it . What kills me is a lot of people on this forum think every thing is so easy . If your plumbing stops up in your house and you call a plumber , he says its 50-75 bucks an hour , you don't tell him his price is high when your bathtub is backed up full of sh-t  , he has a skill just like a person who can layout computer graphics , has the talent to design the graphics and patience to paint something the needs to be completely disassembled and involves electrical connections when doing so and needs to go back together and function like it did before you started .And have it stand up to the critique of looking like the real thing from various people on this forum who could not color in a coloring book and stay inside the lines . Some how you disconnect on what someone skills set is worth . Why don't you just dive in and do it yourself and see how easy it is before claiming a price is high.       I suppose you would go into the Ford  dealer and say you want a new F150 and the sale guy says they are $42,500 and you say that is too high , you expect him to sell it to you for what you think you ought to pay  . 

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I think you misunderstood.  For some of us, stating that a price is high is simply stating that we have made a decision to the effect that we do not feel that spending the bucks is worth it for us.

As an example, the new Key Cab Forward, at $7500, is too high priced for me.  I do not doubt that the value is there, and I could afford to write the check without feeling it.  My decision to not do so is based on the fact that, while I truly love Cab Forwards as models, I do not love them $7500 worth.

I doubt the poster meant to denigrate your work.  My model work is now $100/ hour, including coffee breaks.  I have no customers as of June 2016, and am probably going to stay that way!

Lets compare apples to apples. The list price of a new MTH modern diesel is a nickle shy of $500.00. So I walk into the hobby shop and the dealer tells me a custom paint job is another $500.00. That is a 100 % mark up and the price of the engine has now doubled to $1000.00. Now for the F150 with the list price of $42,500. Would I pay an additional 100 % mark up, $85,000.00, to have it custom painted in a scheme that Ford may someday produce?  Of course not. That would be very expensive. BUT, if I were a manufacturer wanting to produce a few thousand of my models in a specific paint scheme, and needed a professional to develop a prototype, the cost is very fair. My post had nothing to do with arguing the price of a finished, out the door, of a manufactured product or was it directed to anyone. I was just stating a simple fact of cost when something is desired. Sure, the price is very fair to the artist and well deserving for their talent, but to the average consumer it is not viewed through the eyes of the artist. Thanks Bob for getting it.

Dave Z

I'm afraid that it's all lost on me.

I've moved to O scale because it's the scratch builders' scale.  I can understand buying ready made electronic bits to save time and expense, but we are modellers - not collectors - or are we?

The people who can produce attractive paint jobs are just like us.  Two hands and two eyes - in most cases. 

They did poor work when they started out, but they persevered and got better and better.  So can we.

Having said that, I now remember the days of building block detectors and the like, so electronics is in as well. 

Basically, we can make anything we want - just have a look at JPV building his 3D printed rolling stock.

I reckon that if you buy it, you're a collector; if you make it, you're a modeller. 

. . . and it works out a lot cheaper. 

 Glad it generated a chuckle, Dan.  I get a perverse form of satisfaction posting that pic,....almost as satisfying as it was creating the abomination.  The product of a spare GG1 shell, some warbonnet decals and a twisted mind.  Sure wish I could find a spare William's chassis to paint silver for full effect. 

Bruce

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