Tube track lock on preference?

Hi Dave, Track lockons are historically correct, but I have the power and ground wires soldered to the track.  If you are looking for a period correct lockon, check out Brasseur Electric Trains at 989-793-4753 or 989-763-6887 or on line at www.brasseurelectrictrains.com

Hope this helps: Gary

I don't like them but for historical correctness. Other than soldering I have seen an article in Classic Toy Trains suggest pushing a spade lug into the gap under the rail. If you have the room and the proper tension, it sounds better than clip on connectors 

Chuck TCA LCCA ARRL BMWMOA

cjack posted:

I don't like them but for historical correctness. Other than soldering I have seen an article in Classic Toy Trains suggest pushing a spade lug into the gap under the rail. If you have the room and the proper tension, it sounds better than clip on connectors 

Sounds like soldering may be best. I only care about performance.

Dave

By the way, if you are moving your Fastrack along to someone, the continuity issue between sections was sort of addressed by a Lionel video where they suggested slightly bending both hot rail pins toward each other, i.e. the mating pin on the next section. That would improve both the contact between pins and tension the center pin against the crimps underneath the plastic.

Chuck TCA LCCA ARRL BMWMOA

cjack posted:

By the way, if you are moving your Fastrack along to someone, the continuity issue between sections was sort of addressed by a Lionel video where they suggested slightly bending both hot rail pins toward each other, i.e. the mating pin on the next section. That would improve both the contact between pins and tension the center pin against the crimps underneath the plastic

I had it all screwed down and landscaped it was also very loud with 3 trains running. I had K-Line Shadow Rail tube track on my layout in 2005 and always wished I had kept it. When I found a lot for a good price it was an easy choice. I don't like being finished with a layout anyway working on it is more fun for me.

Dave Ripp. posted:
cjack posted:

I don't like them but for historical correctness. Other than soldering I have seen an article in Classic Toy Trains suggest pushing a spade lug into the gap under the rail. If you have the room and the proper tension, it sounds better than clip on connectors 

Sounds like soldering may be best. I only care about performance.

Dave

The train club guys here also solder many of  the rails together. We recently took down a layout of one of the fellows who moved to a retirement home and the trouble with that was the track wasn't very marketable. Maybe if it was done in somewhat short sections of say 6 to 8 feet long, and feeds run to each soldered section, it would be best.

Chuck TCA LCCA ARRL BMWMOA

Depending on how you're powering the layout, The TMCC lockon can be good, and provides another level of protection.

I have a couple that I use with my Fastrack layout, and I have one that connectes to my tube layout.

6-14178_149

Music, trains, boneless chicken farming
David

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cjack posted:
Dave Ripp. posted:
cjack posted:

I don't like them but for historical correctness. Other than soldering I have seen an article in Classic Toy Trains suggest pushing a spade lug into the gap under the rail. If you have the room and the proper tension, it sounds better than clip on connectors 

Sounds like soldering may be best. I only care about performance.

Dave

The train club guys here also solder many of  the rails together. We recently took down a layout of one of the fellows who moved to a retirement home and the trouble with that was the track wasn't very marketable. Maybe if it was done in somewhat short sections of say 6 to 8 feet long, and feeds run to each soldered section, it would be best.

My layout is only 9 1/2 by 19 but I plan on 8 to 10 power points. Maybe over kill but why not. 

Dave Ripp. posted:

... lock on to supply power any preferences?.

I prefer not to use Lockons when possible, but short of soldering to the track. Instead, if you look your switches and remote sections(UCS, RCS, 6019, 1019, etc.) they all have connections to the rails that can be used to power the rails.

The center post of each 022/1121 and ground(inside) post of each 1122/1122E/5121/5122 substitutes for Lockon clip 2. K-Line switches have 5 posts, two of which are direct substitutes for clips 1 & 2.  Even the 022 has a center rail connection point if you use a coaxial plug for the fixed voltage plug - the tip is the fixed voltage and the sleeve is the track voltage.

The screws on the UCS(1 & 3) and RCS/1019(1 & 4) can be used as track power connection points too.

You can get creative with your power connections using fewer Lockons with other accessory connections as well. To me, the use of a Lockon is an appearance issue for the most part as they can get cluttered with wires and require more holes drilled in the platform, so I use as few as possible in the open. I still use them for hidden/obscured areas where there is not another easy connection point.

Rob

EscapeRocks posted:

Depending on how you're powering the layout, The TMCC lockon can be good, and provides another level of protection.

I have a couple that I use with my Fastrack layout, and I have one that connectes to my tube layout.

6-14178_149

Note that the TMCC Direct Lockon will stomp on the MTH DCS signal, so you want to keep that in mind if you run MTH DCS locomotives in command mode.

These are some examples of what is available on line today........ guys at train shows also sell these plus Brasseur Electric Trains:  www.brasseurelectrictrains.com

Postwar for Crossing Signal1 Lionel Postwar 154 C Track Contactor for Signal Crossing

Large variety pack / Vintage Lionel

2 MASSIVE Lot of Vintage Lionel O Gauge Lock-on Power Train Clip

Lionel Prewar

3 Lionel Prewar UTC Universal Lockon O & Standard Gauge

Gary

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Soldering is the best way to go for the best possible connection.  

That said, I have had good results using a small screwdriver pushed into the underside of the rail to pry it open slightly, then pushing the bare end of a wire into the gap.  Remove the screwdriver and the rail will pinch the wire pretty well.  Some folks Like to use a crimp connector stuffed in in the same way, but just the bare wire has worked fine for me.  If you are unsure of your track plan or might be moving things around this works well.  Of course you can also stuff the wire into the bottom of the rail then solder it as well for a solid connection that is invisibly hidden under the track.  

While many of the newer track systems are much more realistic, I still think tubular is the easiest to use and most versatile of them all.  

JGL

$ This is John Galt speaking.  $

“I swear by my life and my love of it that I will never live for the sake of another man, nor ask another man to live for mine.” 

 

 

When I set up a floor loop, I use modified lock-ons.  I basically drilled them for machine screws as studs, that way I can run feeders with ring terminals.  Tubular on a laminate floor walks around alot, and I was getting feeders pulling out of the original clip terminals.  

For my train board, I solder feeders.

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