Wheel Slip With Sparks

From the engine RPM sound, it appears to me that this locomotive was pulling a heavy cut of cars (to be switched?).  Three things can eliminate wheels spinning like this:

  • Use of sand (requires that the locomotive be supplied and the sanders maintained in operating condition);
  • If that fails, the Engineer can use a very light independent brake application while power is applied;
  • If both of those remedies fail, then tonnage must be reduced.  

I can't believe that there was an Engineer on the locomotive.  Surely, this engine was being operated from some distance away by a belt pack.  Still, operating rules do not permit blind movements.  So, somebody, either aboard the engine or on the ground, should have been able to see this wheel spin.  Locomotive wheel heating/cooling cycles are a touchy issue, as it has been implicated as a significant cause of broken wheels on locomotives.

Whether the Engineer or Operator was aboard the engine or on the ground, that person is a meathead.

Tom

 

Superintendent, High Plains Division (O Gauge) 

The Panhandle & Santa Fe Railway Co.

Lone Star Hi-Railers

Santa Fe, All the Way

Number 90 posted:

From the engine RPM sound, it appears to me that this locomotive was pulling a heavy cut of cars (to be switched?).  Three things can eliminate wheels spinning like this:

  • Use of sand (requires that the locomotive be supplied and the sanders maintained in operating condition);
  • If that fails, the Engineer can use a very light independent brake application while power is applied;
  • If both of those remedies fail, then tonnage must be reduced.  

I can't believe that there was an Engineer on the locomotive.  Surely, this engine was being operated from some distance away by a belt pack.  Still, operating rules do not permit blind movements.  So, somebody, either aboard the engine or on the ground, should have been able to see this wheel spin.  Locomotive wheel heating/cooling cycles are a touchy issue, as it has been implicated as a significant cause of broken wheels on locomotives.

Whether the Engineer or Operator was aboard the engine or on the ground, that person is a meathead.

Whether engineer or RCO the video didn't do him any good at the investigation if there was one. 

Rob M. ARHS # 3846 PRRT&HS # 8141 EPTC "Life Is Like A Mountain Railway, With An Engineer That's Brave..."

juniata guy posted:

Tom:

Watching the video on a larger screen than my iPhone; I'd swear I can see a right shoulder and arm on the engineer's side of the cab in that lead motor. 

Can't argue with the meathead comment. 

Curt

I thought a meathead was dead from the neck up!

The TEXAS SPECIAL:  The REAL RED streak of the golden prairies!

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