Just looking for information about the 2 Reading T1s under restoration (2100, 2102) like restoration progress, plans, and when the restoration is expected to be completed. I'd especially like to hear information about 2100's restoration since I live about an hour south of that one. Anything helpful!

Nick

Part-time Ferroequinologist

Pennsy Productions - Bringing you the best railroads of the Midwest

“It’s a good thing to let another generation know what a steam locomotive is.” - W. Graham Claytor, Jr.

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TrainMan1225 posted:

Just looking for information about the 2 Reading T1s under restoration (2100, 2102) like restoration progress, plans, and when the restoration is expected to be completed. I'd especially like to hear information about 2100's restoration since I live about an hour south of that one. Anything helpful!

Concerning the 2100, you might try their website for up-dates. I can't remember their website, so you will have to Google it. Edit:  try www.americansteamrailroad.org for information about 2100

The 2102 is owned by the Blue Mountain & Reading RR, and their people have been quietly working on 2102, between their normal motive power mechanical responsibilities. They naturally don't release much information as they are a very busy railroad, plus they have their Pacific steam locomotive to maintain and operate.

superwarp1 posted:

Didn't see anyone else post this but here's the video for the 2100 summer update.

I saw that a few days ago. I was expecting it to be something big, but it turns out they just turned 2100 around to perform work on the side sheets.

Nick

Part-time Ferroequinologist

Pennsy Productions - Bringing you the best railroads of the Midwest

“It’s a good thing to let another generation know what a steam locomotive is.” - W. Graham Claytor, Jr.

UPDATE: I will be seeing the 2100 at the Midwest Railway Preservation Society's open house on Sept 8th. I'll share pics and information as soon as I can.

Nick

Part-time Ferroequinologist

Pennsy Productions - Bringing you the best railroads of the Midwest

“It’s a good thing to let another generation know what a steam locomotive is.” - W. Graham Claytor, Jr.

Here’s the updates from the Midwest Railway Preservation Society’s open house! Seeing 2100, Grand Trunk 4070, and all of the other pieces of equipment in the historic roundhouse was amazing. Here’s all the information I could gather about 2100’s restoration:

- The group is looking to hydro in Spring 2019 or sooner, if money allows

- The group wants the 2100 to be fully operable in Fall 2019, but the cost to finish the restoration is $255,000.

- Should everything go to plan, you will see 2100 running excursions starting in 2020, after all test runs with her are completed and all kinks worked out.

- While at one point they were looking for 3,000 people to donate $21.00/month, they are now looking for 975.

- The Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad has offered to let ASR test run 2100 on their line, and later participate in their annual “Steam in the Valley” event.

Pics below:

The missing set of drivers from GTW 4070, and a steam locomotive bellAn ex-B&O caboose parked in front of the roundhouse

One of MRPS’s many Pullman coaches, this one named “Mt. Baxter”The cab of GTW 4070

One of 3 model railroads they had set up in a refrigerator carThe first view I got of no. 2100 from across the turntable

Ex-Nickel Plate coach no. 62, which is apparently haunted by ghosts of people who died in a 1943 accident. I will be in this car behind NKP 765!MRPS’s own Grand Trunk Western 2-8-2 no. 4070. Her front face is in storage

Me in front of Reading T1 no. 2100. To visualize how big it is, I’m 5’7”.

The inside of the huge firebox of no. 2100.2100’s huge 70” drivers.

2100’s driving rods.2100’s cylinders

2100’s beautiful front face.An Erie-Lackawanna F unit in storage outside

A panorama of no. 2100’s tender in storage outside.

Nick

Part-time Ferroequinologist

Pennsy Productions - Bringing you the best railroads of the Midwest

“It’s a good thing to let another generation know what a steam locomotive is.” - W. Graham Claytor, Jr.

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The ALCo pulling the train
ASR treasurer Forrest Nace telling a history of no. 2100.

Bringing back an older thread of mine here, but it looks like we have somewhat of a status update on Reading T1 no. 2102! These photos were posted to the Facebook page "Fans of the Reading T-1", and seem to show the 2102's firebox and front tube sheet in particular. This is only a handful of the photos posted.

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Additionally, this was posted to the Facebook page "Reading & Northern Railfans". This is from a recent Trains Magazine catalog. I find the photo of the 2102 next to Pacific no. 425 particularly exciting. However, I would take the text highlighted in red with a grain of salt, as Andy has been saying this for years now, and the locomotive is still not finished.

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Now, lets shift our focus on to sister no. 2100. I recently became a member of the American Steam Railroad and had my first work session just yesterday. Within the past 6 months or so, we lifted the newly fabricated inner side sheets into the firebox, welded these to the old plates, drilled out all of the staybolt holes, and riveted the sheets to the mudring, among many other projects. For our work session yesterday, we did something quite noticeable...as in we put the bell and bracket back onto the smokebox.

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Other work included putting some of the ashpan brackets back on, and cleaning and painting of some of the stoker parts. We still need to raise $245,000 to complete the restoration, and $24,000 to complete the firebox project, which would allow us to do a hydrostatic test. Every little donation helps.

Finally, to answer your first question before it's asked, if possible, we would be more than happy to partner up with the Reading & Northern to get the two T1s back together again. That would be the first time since 1975 that two Reading T1s were together, and the first time since 1964 that two were steaming together...hard to believe!

Nick

Part-time Ferroequinologist

Pennsy Productions - Bringing you the best railroads of the Midwest

“It’s a good thing to let another generation know what a steam locomotive is.” - W. Graham Claytor, Jr.

Borden Tunnel posted:

2102 photos were posted 4/20, looks like a lot of heavy rebuilding which confirms my thoughts that this engine was really beat.

I figured that too. I believe the last time the 2102 had any major work was during the time she spent on the Reading. Check out this video from 1991. I wouldn't be able to tell any boiler problems just by watching, but the rods seem to exhibit a lot of clanking, so I think those will need to be re-machined if they haven't been already.

Nick

Part-time Ferroequinologist

Pennsy Productions - Bringing you the best railroads of the Midwest

“It’s a good thing to let another generation know what a steam locomotive is.” - W. Graham Claytor, Jr.

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I found this issue of TRAINS and in the article along with this great cover shot, David P. Morgan writes that the 2102 had to be rebuilt in 1974-75 by Steam Tours, Inc. of Akron,OH.
He describes his trip around Horseshoe in Oct. 1976 in the usual DPM style, even quoting Scripture.
It must have been something to hear this hog pull an SD45 and 20 cars around the curve.
2102's flue time ran out in 1991, and was stored in several places before R&N's steam shop was built.

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TrainMan1225 posted:
Borden Tunnel posted:

2102 photos were posted 4/20, looks like a lot of heavy rebuilding which confirms my thoughts that this engine was really beat.

I figured that too. I believe the last time the 2102 had any major work was during the time she spent on the Reading. Check out this video from 1991. I wouldn't be able to tell any boiler problems just by watching, but the rods seem to exhibit a lot of clanking, so I think those will need to be re-machined if they haven't been already.

"Clanking rods" are not necessarily a sign of wear, especially if you hear them when the locomotive is just  drifting.  The last thing you want is no noise, because that would mean they are too tight and the bearings would overheat.  Roller bearings, yes, they should be quiet, but not plain bearings.  

A certain individual had new bearings made with tighter specs than the factory for a certain locomotive. It did not work out at all, what a surprise.

Also, a little "slop" is good for going around tight curviture.

Rich, Jack, and others can give you much more information.

 

Hello everybody,

Here with an update on no. 2100. We have accomplished quite a bit these past two work sessions. Last week, we painted the front of the engine black. Now she looks the best she has in years! Other work included the installation of the new wooden pilot steps.

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Fire her up!

This is essentially how the engine will look when it’s done. The paint scheme we’ll start out with is basically Reading Freight Black, but occasionally we’ll paint her up in special schemes (Iron Horse Rambles, for example).

During today’s work session, we worked to remove the “Ferroequus” lettering from the tender. It was a hot day outside, so thank God the tender was inside for today!

Here’s what we started out with...

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And here’s what we had at the end of the day.

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The lettering was basically industrial-grade reflective tape rather than paint, so many volunteers essentially spent the whole day on a ladder scraping away!

As far as 2102 goes, my understanding is that they just put the flues back in. The engine was pretty beat, so they’ve been doing very intensive work, including replacement of one (or both) of the flue sheets. It seems they’ve replaced the same section of the firebox that we have by looking at photos.

Regardless, they’ll have a very reliable locomotive when they’re done!

Nick

Part-time Ferroequinologist

Pennsy Productions - Bringing you the best railroads of the Midwest

“It’s a good thing to let another generation know what a steam locomotive is.” - W. Graham Claytor, Jr.

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NS6770Fan posted:

Can’t wait to have TWO steaming Reading T1’s within the next few years! How much is needed to complete 2100?

$245,000 to completely finish the engine. $24,000 more and we'll be doing a hydrostatic test!

Nick

Part-time Ferroequinologist

Pennsy Productions - Bringing you the best railroads of the Midwest

“It’s a good thing to let another generation know what a steam locomotive is.” - W. Graham Claytor, Jr.

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