Arnold D. Cribari posted:

The Yankees just swept a great team, the Cleveland Indians, three straight. They are on an amazing streak, having won 15 of their last 16 games. On Tuesday they will host the team with the best record in the Major Leagues, the Boston RedSox.

Below is the New Haven FA AA, now on a siding in the Bronx, that is being prepared to make the trip to Boston tomorrow, to bring the RedSox to NY:20180506_084050

LOL, Arnold

Arnold,

Will the "splendid splinter" and Yaz be on that train to the Bronx?

MELGAR

MELGAR posted:
Arnold D. Cribari posted:

The Yankees just swept a great team, the Cleveland Indians, three straight. They are on an amazing streak, having won 15 of their last 16 games. On Tuesday they will host the team with the best record in the Major Leagues, the Boston RedSox.

Below is the New Haven FA AA, now on a siding in the Bronx, that is being prepared to make the trip to Boston tomorrow, to bring the RedSox to NY:20180506_084050

LOL, Arnold

Arnold,

Will the "splendid splinter" and Yaz be on that train to the Bronx?

MELGAR

Yes, provided that both DiMaggio and Mantle are in the outfield for the Yankees to even things up. 

LOL, Arnold

In my little world, I leave this troubled world behind.

Breaking News!

The Boston RedSox are now getting first class, red carpet treatment on this stunning New Haven passenger train, bound for Yankee Stadium in the Bronx:

In about 3 hours they will arrive in NYC, get a good night's sleep, and then the 2 best teams in baseball will compete tomorrow night at the House that Judge (I mean Ruth) built.

LOL, Arnold

In my little world, I leave this troubled world behind.

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I have a couple of Weaver Osgood-Bradley cars in McGiniss colors (black with orange stripe and white lettering) and I wanted to detail the interior.  I searched all over the web but could not find any pictures of the interior of these cars.  Does anyone know, or remember, what colors were used for the floors and seats?

Dan

I'm pretty sure that some of those were around when I was a kid and I think they had green vinyl seats many of which you could move the back of the seat to create a 4 person section and/or flip all of the backs when heading the other direction. I could be mistaken though. It's been a few years!

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Paul

Thanks Phoch00.  That sounds like it might be right.  These cars started life in NH green with gold.  I would doubt that any extra money was spent to redo the interior when they were painted black.  Do you have any memory of the floor?  I would guess some type of tile.  Maybe a different shade of green?

Thanks

Dan

😁 Thanks, Paul.  I rode the subway for years in the 60’s and 70’s so I know what gum and god knows what looks like on the floor.

Unless someone else chimes in, I will try a lighter green floor with Pullman green seat.

Thanks for your help.

Dan

I've spent the last week completely rebuilding my layout and train room. My intention is to model New Haven to Grand Central late 70's- early 80's including freight lines. I've taken some liberties here and there and I need to do a bunch of clean-up but here's how it looks so far.

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Paul

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phoch00 posted:

I've spent the last week completely rebuilding my layout and train room. My intention is to model New Haven to Grand Central late 70's- early 80's including freight lines. I've taken some liberties here and there and I need to do a bunch of clean-up but here's how it looks so far.

Very nice layout, Paul. And I also like the beautiful window and natural light from it that brightens your layout.

Arnold

In my little world, I leave this troubled world behind.

Danr posted:

I have a couple of Weaver Osgood-Bradley cars in McGiniss colors (black with orange stripe and white lettering) and I wanted to detail the interior.  I searched all over the web but could not find any pictures of the interior of these cars.  Does anyone know, or remember, what colors were used for the floors and seats?

I just found this 

As mentioned, those handles allowed the seats to switch from front to back to create an area for a group of 4 or to switch directions of the car when coming/going to GCT. 

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Paul

phoch00 posted:

I've spent the last week completely rebuilding my layout and train room. My intention is to model New Haven to Grand Central late 70's- early 80's including freight lines. I've taken some liberties here and there and I need to do a bunch of clean-up but here's how it looks so far.

New Haven to Grand Central is a very interesting stretch of railroad. You are off to a great start with that GCT model. The Life Savers sign remains, to this day, atop the building in Port Chester, New York, that once served as the company's headquarters. The New Haven's (now Metro-North Railroad's) tracks pass within about 100 feet of the building and sign just before they cross the state line into Connecticut.

MELGAR

Yeah, as a kid that was one of my favorite things to see on the train. I'd imagine that they were real lifesavers that were that giant and how amazing they'd be to eat. Later on I had a friend who lived in that building when they turned it into condos. They were/are beautiful condos now.

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Paul

I found another photo of the Providence, Warren & Bristol, RR which was operated by the NH until the NH's demise:

This picture was taken in the mid- to late-1950s and shows the end of the line here in Bristol, RI.  The water at the top of the photo is the head of Bristol Harbor.  The trucks on the right were for a Narragansett Beer distributor.  The freight yard shown above is now a park next to the water.

Steven J. Serenska

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Tom McGriel posted:

Dear Melgar, Can you explain the significance of the EP vs. EF designation on the big electric motors? Also the EYs. Thanks a lot.

EP = Electric Passenger (locomotive)

EF = Electric Freight (locomotive)

EY = Electric Yard (electric yard switcher locomotive)

DEY = Diesel-Electric Yard (diesel switcher locomotive)

DER = Diesel-Electric Road (diesel road locomotive)

MELGAR

These photos show the New Haven Railroad consist that I ran today. The EMD FL-9 #2043 is one of my favorite locomotives. It just returned from a repair at Sunset/3rd Rail and is again running perfectly. Green Railway Post Office #3286 is a Weaver model and the McGinnis scheme 60-foot cars were made by Atlas O Trainman.

MELGAR

MELGAR_1_FL9_2043_CONSISTMELGAR_3_NH_RPO_3286MELGAR_4_NH_CONSISTMELGAR_5_NH_CONSIST

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Danr posted:

Paul, thanks for the picture of the car interior.  Nice work on your layout.  I have that same Lifesaver sign.  I drove past the Lifesaver building a number of times.

IMG_0158

I found some pictures of it when it was the Lifesaver building and at least at some point it had the "giant" tubes of lifesavers on the lawn in front of the building and wrapping around it. That's why I decided to put my sign on the ground in some bushes. I don't recall if the tubes on the ground level were illuminated or not but I decided to put the sign at ground level.

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Paul

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eddie g posted:

My father took the NYNH&H from New Rochelle to Grand Central every weekday from 1930 to 1944. They would turn the seat around and play bridge every day.

My father took New Haven/Metro North to GCT every day from Stamford Station (and sometimes the Springdale Spur) from the early 70's through the late 80's. His company moved out of NYC and on to Long Island in the late 80's which meant he had to drive it instead. 

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Paul

Here is a picture of an Osgood-Bradley car with the interior painted green.  It looked darker on the bench but looks lighter under the LED's in the car.  Does this look like the color they were or should it be darker?

IMG_0161

Dan

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I think the color was much darker. Like a forest green or something. Again, just my memory which could be inaccurate. They also could have started that color and then after 50 years of smoke and whatever wore them down to a much darker green.

Danr posted:

Here is a picture of an Osgood-Bradley car with the interior painted green.  It looked darker on the bench but looks lighter under the LED's in the car.  Does this look like the color they were or should it be darker?

IMG_0161

 

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Paul

Danr posted:

Here is a picture of an Osgood-Bradley car with the interior painted green.  It looked darker on the bench but looks lighter under the LED's in the car.  Does this look like the color they were or should it be darker?

IMG_0161

Dan,

Volume 32 Issue 3 of "Shoreliner," the magazine of the New Haven Railroad Historical and Technical Association (nhrhta.org), has an article about the Osgood Bradley lightweight passenger cars. As built during the 1930s, the article states that "the seats were upholstered in a dark blue, checkered pattern, mohair plush." Color and black/white photographs in the article also show a dark color. During the 1950s, there was a car refurbishment program about which the article says "the coach seats .... are re-dyed a deep blue." A black/white photograph confirms the dark color. Having said that, the Weaver Models O scale New Haven Railroad American Flyer cars (with Hunter Green exteriors) have light grey interiors.

MELGAR

Deep blue    Fortunately, these things are held together with about 20 screws and the entire interior comes out for painting.  I have two of these cars,  The second one is apart but I haven't done anything yet.  Not sure that I have a deep blue in stock.  I'll post a picture after the next try.

Thanks

Dan

Danr posted:

Deep blue    Fortunately, these things are held together with about 20 screws and the entire interior comes out for painting.  I have two of these cars,  The second one is apart but I haven't done anything yet.  Not sure that I have a deep blue in stock.  I'll post a picture after the next try.

If you go to the website of the historical association (nhrhta.org) and click on "back in stock," you can scroll through a list of "Shoreliners" that are still available for purchase, including the one with the relevant article. I think it would be useful for you.

MELGAR

Danr posted:

Deep blue    Fortunately, these things are held together with about 20 screws and the entire interior comes out for painting.  I have two of these cars,  The second one is apart but I haven't done anything yet.  Not sure that I have a deep blue in stock.  I'll post a picture after the next try.

Thanks

Sorry if I led you astray. At least you're going from light green to dark blue which is probably easier than the other way around!

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Paul

My K-Line Jet converted to two-rail:

102_0120102_0121

Unlike the prototype, this one has all axles powered:

102_0128102_0129

 

I also have three K-Line 21" NH passenger cars that have been two-railed.

Later Gator,

  Dave

 

Here comes a Yankee with a blackened soul,
Heading to Gatow with a load of coal.
......Anonymous U. S. pilot during the Berlin Airlift

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MELGAR posted:

Some of my favorite New Haven locomotives. I commend MTH for having made such outstanding models.

EP3 353

MELGAR_NHRR_04_EP3_353

MELGAR

Beautiful engines, MELGAR. Now for one of my classic dumb questions... do you know what the purpose of the “sun porch” on the front of the engine is???

Thanks.

Paul

Techno-Peasant of the First Order

Provisionary Member - Brotherhood of the Crappy Basement Layout

 TCA 15-70689

LCCA RM-39621

LOTS RM-9326

Apples55 posted:
MELGAR posted:

Some of my favorite New Haven locomotives. I commend MTH for having made such outstanding models.

EP3 353

MELGAR_NHRR_04_EP3_353

MELGAR

Beautiful engines, MELGAR. Now for one of my classic dumb questions... do you know what the purpose of the “sun porch” on the front of the engine is???

This answer is somewhat conjectural on my part...

The locomotive length was determined by the need for six axles to mount the motors and produce the tractive force, plus the front and rear two-axle trucks to assist in steering and tracking. The box cab was shorter because a shorter length was sufficient to enclose the necessary machinery, transformers and cabs. The porches were structural members mounted to the front and rear trucks and carried tracking forces into the locomotive frame (and possibly into the six-axle trucks) while also supporting some of the engine weight.

MELGAR

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