This Facebook photo has a bit of everything in it, but the NH stands out a bit more than even my beloved GG1 - the caption reads:

”Penn Station in New York City and the trains of the Pennsy, LIRR, and NH on July 1, 1960. (Mac Owen)“

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Paul,

Your New Haven posts from Facebook are great! The area pictured is now covered over and the southbound departure on Amtrak from New York Penn occurs in what seems like a tunnel. No more view to the streets above before entering the Hudson River tunnel.

MELGAR

Two fantastic Facebook photos today (ultimately compliments of the New Haven Railroad Historical & Technical Association)... the caption on the first reads:

McGinnis-painted EP-2 #312 is westbound...somewhere... on April 5, 1956.  All NH electrics had nicknames, and because these were the first units to get the "cat whisker" paint job, they were known as "Tigers".

"Tiger Tiger, burning bright,

In the forests of the night;

What immortal hand or eye,

Could frame thy fearful symmetry?" - William Blake

Of course, it doesn't have quite the same effect with this particular McGinnis scheme. 

Kodachrome by David R. Sweetland.

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The second caption reads:

An M.U. & trailer fan trip on the Hell Gate Bridge, April 3, 1954.  Can you imagine Amtrak doing this today?  The mind boggles...

Another unlikely-to-be-published pic due to the blurry bits, but interesting none-the-less.  Note the "Fight Cancer" logos on each car and the silver paint job the bridge.

It must have been a great view of the city that day.  I wonder how long they got to stay up there? David R. Sweetland”

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Hi:

I asked this on the GGD thread, but this clearly is a better venue...

I just received my GGD NH green heavyweights, they have gold lettering. Previous GGD heavyweights had white lettering.

What years did NH use gold lettering, what years white?

Cheers!

Jan

This is a really fascinating photo from Facebook. Amazing that this was designed by Cass Gilbert... would have loved to have seen it in it’s heyday. He also designed the Woolworth Building and the Home Office of New York Life Insurance at 26th and Madison in Manhattan - a place I spent 34 years of my life!!! The rather lengthy description reads:

(photo via @museumofcityny)

In 1904 the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad began work on their Harlem line, planning for 12 new stations. Of the proposed number, only six were constructed, and only three survive (and just barely) today. The Morris Park Station is one of those survivors. Designed by Cass Gilbert, the Morris Park Station (along with the others on the Harlem line) were never as popular as expected. Opened in 1908, they were all closed by 1937 when the line was taken completely out of service.

The Morris Park Station (1010 Sackett Avenue)  was a small multicolored tile and brick structure that, according to a New York Times article, looked like "it could have been a cable-car terminal in the Austrian Alps." After closing the buildings were unfortunately left to deteriorate. Since the station closed the Morris Park building has had a different (and historically inaccurate) roof installed and its large windows bricked in. The building has been the home of the Parkchester Rifle & Revolver Club since at least the 1980s. In the wake of the attacks of September 11th, they painted their building with an American flag motif, which remains today”

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Today’s Facebook gem, compliments of the New Haven Railroad & Technical Association. The caption reads:

”EP-4 #364 at New Haven, Connecticut on September 11, 1957. Unfortunately not long for this world as the McGinnis administration and follow up president George Alpert wanted to be rid of mainline electrics. The issue was that while scrapping electrics, catenary, and power plants gave a significant short-term bonus to the bottom line, the long term finances are beneficial to keeping the electrics. Kodachrome by David R Sweetland”

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IMHO, not quite as nice as a GG1, but I like the lines better than the EP-5.

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Another Facebook gem... the NH had some good looking steamers. The rather brief caption reads:

New Haven class I-5 Hudson”

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A few more Facebook pics from the New Haven Railroad Historical and Technical Association...

The first - “S-1 0941 at New Bedford, Massachusetts on June 10, 1956. S-1's were the NH's most numerous diesel loco with 65 units on the roster. Now consider that the NH also had 10 DEY-2's, 22 S-2's, 11 HH600's, 10 HH660's, 10 LS-1200's, 19 44tonners, and 20 SW1200's for a total of 167 switchers. It shows just how much switching the NH did.

The grabirons shown here on 0941 are all orange, which is not following the NH paint diagram. The grabs should be all black in this paint scheme. Photo by David R. Sweetland”.

EDE29CE0-2286-4807-84F3-A563D456BDBC

Up next... the caption reads:

”FA-1 0403 and FB-2 465 at Northup Avenue yard, Providence, Rhode Island in January 1955.

The NH was one of two railroads (the other was L&N) that ordered FB-2's without ordering any matching FA-2's. The reasoning is that the NH ordered 15 A-B-A sets of FA-1/FB-1's, ran them a bit, and then decided that they wanted 5 sets of A-B-B-A FA/FB's. But the time they ordered more FB's, Alco didn't make FB-1's anymore, just FB-2's.

Note that the 465 has no "0" prefix, unlike the FA-1. The "0" prefix designated non-steam power when the NH had steam. When the FB-2's arrived in 1951, most NH steam was gone. Yet while the "0" was removed from the electrics after steam was scrapped, the FA's never lost theirs. That's the NH for you. Kodachrome by David R. Sweetland”.

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And finally... a steamer. The caption reads:

”The last and most power class of steam switchers the NH had is represented here by #3608, a Class Y-4 (plus the follow-up Y-4-a's). These were 3-cylinder machines that had a 3rd piston under the centerline of the smokebox and attached to center of the #2 driver axle (which was like a crankshaft). Instead of 4-chuffs per revolution of the main drivers, you had six.

Over 211 tons in working order (w/ tender), the Y-4's could put out 60,000 lbs. of tractive effort (that's over 5000 lbs. more than the USRA-designed Y-3 Class of NH 0-8-0's). My favorite example of their power is from "New Haven Power". Two Y-4's were used to push a freight out of Cedar Hill...and pushed the steel caboose right through a wooden potato car ahead of it.

#3608 here is looking a little worn, but the tender is nice and clean. The round box between the coal pocket and the tender light contains a firehose. Photo courtesy of George Ford”

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Putnam Division posted:

I cannot remember if I posted this before......this was given to me many years ago by another Forum member when he down-sized......

3E181EA2-8BF8-4DFE-B70F-C9E407AF0AF7Peter

Peter (or others):

What does the "R.R.S." stand for in the upper right corner?  That's a new one on me.

Also, I think it's been longer than 5 days so you should probably return that to the NH.  

Steven J. Serenska

Took a quick check in my postal history sources but nothing yet. Of course if was a common RR abreviation in use it wouldn't be.

A quick check of my LIRR postal history turned up this. These seemed to be commonly used for requesting payment for shipments. As you can see it wasn't filled in on this cover but perhaps an enployee "borrowed" one for his personal use.

RRS

The placement on your cover looks like applying the stamp would have covered it up, a further mystery.

RR postal history can be fascinating. Pieces of history that you know actually were on that train.

If you start to get serious check out the Mobile Post Office Society, covers the history of mail carried on RR, trolley, buses and boats. Some very complete and detailed publications about the postmarks.

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Putnam Division posted:
Apples55 posted:

Another Facebook gem... the NH had some good looking steamers. The rather brief caption reads:

New Haven class I-5 Hudson”

BF3A3B59-C6B7-4ED6-8483-C11D80DD5EF9

Love it!

Peter

Couldn’t agree more, Peter. One thing that fascinates me is the “odd” consist... to me, it looks like there is a coach (maybe a Bradley???) immediately behind the tender, and then there appears to be some mail/REA/baggage type cars following. 

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Two more Facebook shots from the the New Haven Railroad Historical and Technical Association. I so wish this pic was in color... the caption reads:

“New Haven PA-1 #0767, a Class DER-3a and built by Alco-General Electric in 1948, is seen here at Groton, Connecticut, May 29, 1949. She is westbound with and 11-car train No. 23, the "Yankee Clipper", running Boston to/from New York daily at 1:00 p.m. On the left is a DL-109 pulling the James E. States circus train, which stretches well past the "Clipper" to the rear. Photo by George E. Votava, J. W. Swanberg Collection.”

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And a bit of steam... the caption reads:

“NH Class I-2 4-6-2 #1305 at Readville, Mass. on April 22, 1946. The fifty I-2's were the real workhorse of the NH steam era. They were seemingly everywhere and handled most every job, passenger or freight. I'd say they were roughly like the NH's RS-3's: go anywhere, do anything power that lasted, gave solid performance, and were liked by the crews. This shot is interesting because you get nice view of the tender deck and the coal bunker extensions. You can tell it is winter; not just because of the trees, but note the canvas cab curtains.

N. Clark Collection. Courtesy of Jack Swanberg”.

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This Facebook entry from the NHRH&TA caught my eye for two reasons... first, for reasons I do not understand, I have an affinity for box cabs (and this is New Haven to boot!!!), and this pic was apparently taken in Bay Ridge Brooklyn - never knew the NH made it there. The caption reads:

”NH EF-1 #089 is in Bay Ridge yard in New York on June 31, 1933, and she's M.U.'d to sister 098. The raked steps on the left end were made that way to avoid the pony wheel axle bearing.

The quill drive is shown off to good effect here. The drive wheel axle is inside a tube (called a quill) that has spokes on both ends. These quill spokes fit between the wheel spokes and are separated from them by heavy springs. The traction motors are geared to the quill, and this insulates the electric motor from track bumps. It did make starting trains a little bumpy.

It must be a hot day in this pic; all the windows and doors are open, and the young "engineer" doesn't appear to be wearing a shirt. But then, the pans aren't raised so he's not going too far, anyways. Collection of NHRHTA”.

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Paul

The line over the Hell Gate bridge interchanging with the LIRR was handled by the New Haven. Sometimes they went all the way to the float bridges in Bay Ridge. The LIRR that was usually third rail but they had some switchers that used the overhead to handle the work also. I believe they were BB-3, small paired box cab bodies (you'd like them).

Scotie posted:

Paul

The line over the Hell Gate bridge interchanging with the LIRR was handled by the New Haven. Sometimes they went all the way to the float bridges in Bay Ridge. The LIRR that was usually third rail but they had some switchers that used the overhead to handle the work also. I believe they were BB-3, small paired box cab bodies (you'd like them).

Thanks for the history, Scotie.

And yes... would like the BB3’s...

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Another Facebook entry... this paint scheme is really growing on me!!! The caption reads:

”On September 1, 1949, a matched set of FAs, led by #0404, are westbound at East Lyme-Niantic, right on the Shore Line (literally; that's the beach on the right). Note the fireman hanging out the window).

This was the delivering scheme for the FA's and all were repainted green & gold by 1954. It is somewhat unusual to see them east of New Haven, Conn. at this time. They were all assigned to Maybrook pool service right from the get-go, but I guess it didn't stop them from going east on occasion. Kodachrome by John M. Wallace”.

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I’m beginning to think the New Haven had the most interesting collection of paint schemes... this Facebook shot has two good ones... the caption reads:

New Haven (NH) Alco FA's under the wires, location unknown, circa June 1959”.

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Apples55 posted:

I’m beginning to think the New Haven had the most interesting collection of paint schemes... this Facebook shot has two good ones... the caption reads:

New Haven (NH) Alco FA's under the wires, location unknown, circa June 1959”.

EE32A1E7-D09C-433A-A720-96D27EA0DB3A

Location is New Haven. The top of the station, built in 1920, can be seen just above the Alco FA.

MELGAR

 

Apples55 posted:

I’m beginning to think the New Haven had the most interesting collection of paint schemes... this Facebook shot has two good ones... the caption reads:

New Haven (NH) Alco FA's under the wires, location unknown, circa June 1959”.

EE32A1E7-D09C-433A-A720-96D27EA0DB3A

It would appear the New Haven had a high employee turnover rate among  paint shop foremen!!

jackson, CEO, Not-So-Great Eastern RR, aka The Never Done Line

          Division of the Southern Adirondack Railway Cartel

 

 

modeltrainsparts posted:
Apples55 posted:

I’m beginning to think the New Haven had the most interesting collection of paint schemes... this Facebook shot has two good ones... the caption reads:

New Haven (NH) Alco FA's under the wires, location unknown, circa June 1959”.

EE32A1E7-D09C-433A-A720-96D27EA0DB3A

It would appear the New Haven had a high employee turnover rate among  paint shop foremen!!

Well, Jackson, Orange you glad they didn’t get a great deal on pink paint???  

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MELGAR posted:

Brian,

That has to be your best post ever!

MELGAR

@briansilvermustang;

Have to agree with MELGAR - that is an encyclopedic collection... and although he may not have them in those exact paint schemes, I’ll bet MELGAR probably has an example of almost all those engines   

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Page 22 of this thread and it just gets better and better. Those of us who are captivated by the legend, lore and remarkable panoply of motive power of the NH owe a tremendous thanks to Briansilvermustang and Melgar for providing us with these images and context. I certainly hope they both turn their spotlight on the Maybrook Division and the heavy steam that dominated that route in its heyday. And oh yeah, MTH, please a PS3 I-5!

 

 

Tom McGriel posted:

Page 22 of this thread and it just gets better and better. Those of us who are captivated by the legend, lore and remarkable panoply of motive power of the NH owe a tremendous thanks to Briansilvermustang and Melgar for providing us with these images and context. I certainly hope they both turn their spotlight on the Maybrook Division and the heavy steam that dominated that route in its heyday. And oh yeah, MTH, please a PS3 I-5!

Tom;

Not sure if this qualifies - I know absolutely nothing about the Maybrook Division - but it’s kind of freaky that this popped up on my Facebook feed today... the caption reads:

”Winsted, Conn. around 1910 with what looks like a 4-4-0, a baggage car, a combine, and a coach.

Winsted was the end of the line for the Naugatuck RR and the old Central New England crossed through town on its way from Hartford to Canaan and eventually Maybrook, NY”.

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Paul, Thanks for the start. The Maybrook division ran from Cedar Hill yard across Connecticut, Duchess County and the Hudson River at Poughkeepsie to interchange freight traffic with the Delaware and Hudson amongst others. During its height it featured big 8 and 10 coupled brutes to move the tonnage in and out of lower New England.

Apples55 posted:

”Winsted, Conn. around 1910 with what looks like a 4-4-0, a baggage car, a combine, and a coach.

Winsted was the end of the line for the Naugatuck RR and the old Central New England crossed through town on its way from Hartford to Canaan and eventually Maybrook, NY”.

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I believe this picture shows a train and station of the Naugatuck Railroad in Winsted.

At the time of this picture, the Central New England Railroad ran through northern Connecticut (Winsted), entered New York State at Millerton, crossed the Hudson River on the Poughkeepsie bridge (built in 1888) and then went through Maybrook, NY. It provided a connection from New England to the west. The Central New England was merged into the New Haven in 1927. The Maybrook Line to which Tom refers ran through southern Connecticut from Cedar Hill Yard (2 miles east of the station in New Haven) to Naugatuck (now Devon) Junction, through Danbury, to the Poughkeepsie Bridge and Maybrook. This was the modern New Haven's freight route into New York State which had heavy steam engines (2-10-2 Santa Fe types) and later multiple unit diesels.

MELGAR

I rode Amtrak (though I vaguely remember some of the engines still showing Pennsylvania or Penn Central) between NYC and New London on a number of occasions from ‘72 & ‘74, so I remember this scene well. The caption in Facebook reads:

“At New London, Conn., an eastbound PA-1 #0777 and a CPA24-5 are approaching the platform stop with a baggage, two parlors, a County-series (w/ 3DR's), and a grill, then followed by more cars (probably coaches) as people wait on the platform to board.

The time is between the summer of 1955 and 1958 or so as all the cars are painted orange and still have their skirts (including the grill). In the back are 3 RDC's and 4 RS-units (likely all RS-3's) and an Alco end cab switcher. The triple 7 is looking a little worn, but her paint job is probably about 10 years old by this time.

From the Wayne D. Drummond Collection”

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That is the USCGC seagoing buoy tender Mariposa (WLB-397) in the background. I swear it was still docked there in ‘72 - ‘74!!!

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