ARMISTICE DAY / VETERANS DAY

Armistice Day/ Veterans Day is quickly approaching.  

A heartfelt THANK YOU to all our veterans out there.  And let's also remember those who are no longer with us, like my dad - who served in the Marines during the VietNam War era.  In honor of those who give so much for our freedom, let's see the military themed layouts, y'all!

 

WANNA BE HEARD? VOTE WITH YOUR DOLLARS

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PJB posted:

Armistice Day/ Veterans Day is quickly approaching.  

A heartfelt THANK YOU to all our veterans out there.  And let's also remember those who are no longer with us, like my dad - who served in the Marines during the VietNam War era.  In honor of those who give so much for our freedom, let's see the military themed layouts, y'all!

 

Thank you your comments they are appreciated

To all who served, my deepest gratitude. 

It was called Armistice Day when I was young, in celebration of the end of “The Great War” - at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month... my grandfather served in the Navy in WWI. He always gave us paper poppies for the day (unfortunately, they are not as prevalent as they used to be). A bit off topic, but in case you don’t know why they sell poppies, it was based on a poem by WWI Canadian military physician, Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae:

In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses, row on row,

That mark our place; and in the sky

The larks, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

 

We are the Dead.   Short days ago

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,

Loved and were loved, and now we lie

In Flanders fields.

 

Take up our quarrel with the foe:

To you from failing hands we throw

The torch; be yours to hold it high.

If ye break faith with us who die

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

In Flanders fields.

Paul

Techno-Peasant of the First Order

Provisionary Member - Brotherhood of the Crappy Basement Layout

 

Arnold D. Cribari posted:

The Eagle and the Hawk, written and performed by John Denver. Such beautiful, inspiring lyrics and soaring melody:

 

 

Nice video, Arnold - and my all time favorite JD song.

Paul

Techno-Peasant of the First Order

Provisionary Member - Brotherhood of the Crappy Basement Layout

 

On my layout I created Freedom Park in memory of my Dad, who landed on Omaha Beach with the Big Red One on June 6, 1944.  His division pushed all the way through France and into Germany.  Freedom Park features an authentic stone from Omaha Beach which I picked up in 1999 when I visited the D Day beaches with my Dad.  Freedom Park also features an authentic piece of the Berlin Wall given to me by a German friend who lived in Berlin at the time the wall came down.  IMG_1381IMG_1424IMG_1571

Cheers and Happy Railroading,

Patrick W  

CEO - The Free State Junction Railway 

" Where the music is sweet and the trains always run on time"

Home Office - Patsburg, Maryland 

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Arnold D. Cribari posted:

Beautiful poem, Paul.

This short video, which I may have posted last year, shows post war military trains with a familiar military song (don't remember the title) playing in the background:

Great thread Arnold!   I really enjoyed your video!!

Cheers and Happy Railroading,

Patrick W  

CEO - The Free State Junction Railway 

" Where the music is sweet and the trains always run on time"

Home Office - Patsburg, Maryland 

Apples55 posted:

To all who served, my deepest gratitude. 

It was called Armistice Day when I was young, in celebration of the end of “The Great War” - at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month... my grandfather served in the Navy in WWI. He always gave us paper poppies for the day (unfortunately, they are not as prevalent as they used to be). A bit off topic, but in case you don’t know why they sell poppies, it was based on a poem by WWI Canadian military physician, Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae:

In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses, row on row,

That mark our place; and in the sky

The larks, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

 

We are the Dead.   Short days ago

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,

Loved and were loved, and now we lie

In Flanders fields.

 

Take up our quarrel with the foe:

To you from failing hands we throw

The torch; be yours to hold it high.

If ye break faith with us who die

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

In Flanders fields.

Thank you for the poem!!

My maternal grandfather served in the Marines during The Great War.  My grandmother always referred to the day as Armistice Day.  This was my grandfather's second tour with the Marines.  Having been born in 1896, he was in The Philippines in 190?.  By the time the US entered WWI, he was married had one son, and had been a fireman on the B&O for a number of years.  He enlisted again because he told Grandma it was his duty.  He suffered a severe back injury in a trench and respiratory injury because of the gas the Germans were using.  After 7 years of recovery, he went to work for the B&O for one day, and was declared permanently disabled.  My Grandmother did the bulk of the work raising 3 younger children during the Great Depression.  Grandpa passed on in 1952, before I was born.

My dad served in the Army during the Korean War, but was sent to the East-West border of Germany.  The US and the USSR had bases adjacent to each other while he was there.  There were several times the Russians moved their artillery up like they may do something, so the Americans did likewise, then the Russians backed off.  It must have been tense, but no shots were ever fired.

The photograph is my dad 3 years ago on the day a brick with his name, branch of service, and years service, was dedicated at the Adams Area War Memorial, Mars, Pennsylvania.

2015-05-17 14.47.22-1

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Growing up in my youth when we honored the Vets, we had Spanish American, WW1, WW2, and Korean Vets proudly march in their uniforms and holding the flag. As time passed we no longer saw the Vets of wars long ago. No more Spanish American, nor WW1 vets marching. Today the vets of WW2, Korean War, and even those of us that served during the Vietnam war are dimming every day.

My late best neighbor who landed on D-Day and passed away several years ago, gave me this letter which was passed out to each soldier of the Allied Landing. I treasure it, knowing it was carried on that landing and time afterwards by him. Put away and treasured as a reminder of that time, then giving it to me to remember him by.

I thought I would share it with you all also.

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I have my Dad's Army uniforms from when he was on the East-West German border during the Korean War.  My wife suggested we get the best one cleaned and framed and the folded flag that was over my uncle's coffin when he passed on over 25 years ago.  My uncle was at the Battle of the Bulge.  It is hard for me, (who came of age just after they stopped the draft near the end of the Viet Nam era) to imagine two such mild mannered men being involved in something like that.  I am forever grateful to all veterans and current service people.

Uncle Andy was on one of the flanks just off from the main thrust.  Scary times for sure!!!  I never knew what he had done in WWII until I was in high school, and I was supposed to write a report from interviewing someone who witnessed a major event in history.  That was when my mom brought up that he was at the Battle of the Bulge.

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