A friend of mine and I were walking past a plaza for dinner which we walk past the Chuck E Cheese. We were chatting about a classic game that had a "figure 8" in O gauge track with a locomotive on it. Doing research we found out that it was called the "choo choo game" and found an employee manual which is interesting, it shows the dianostics and where to repair or replace parts. Such parts is the classic  262 crossing gate, the 154 flashers, and the 153 block signal. Further reading shows that it was all MTH products- locomotive, track and accessories. These seemed to be mass produced but with only MTH equipment. 

Does anyone know who contracted to build the layout/game. Why would they choose MTH over lionel? Was there a standard loco to go with the game? 

Heres the manual:

https://webcache.googleusercon...mp;ct=clnk&gl=us

Original Post

Coastal Amusements made it. I never saw one though. The choice of brand was likely for confidence in quality but parts availability would also be a big factor. It wasn't likely the MTH branding was licenced out or need be. Lots of skill games over the years have utilized specific toys within a game without "matching branding" ..e.g. some Atari games used Penny Racer brand cars only, but were not a "Penny Racer Game".

"Still trying to not shoot my eye out"

 

"Nursing insomnia one railcar at a time"

My aroma therapy? Smoke Pellets.

 





It may or may not be for sale to the public via Coastal Amusements, I think they do both private and special label games for C.E.C.  I.e. it may have another name and be availble.

"Still trying to not shoot my eye out"

 

"Nursing insomnia one railcar at a time"

My aroma therapy? Smoke Pellets.

 





42D484FA-04CC-46B0-879D-C7B9CF103F84

Wow! I’m having flash backs. A friend of mine use to own a local hobby shop. He somehow bought one of these back in about 2005 from a closed Chuck E Cheese in Oak Lawn, IL. He had a plan to use it as a store front window display. I helped him pick it up, and I remember even as a first impression that the whole thing was just worn out as if from running, not abuse. It had MTH starter set track in a figure 8 that’s similar to Lionel Fastrack. Just as the manual says, I remember the tracks were soldered together, but rails were loose in the plastic “road bed”. The train would always derail due to rails out of gauge, and there was no replacing just any one section of bad track. There were two locomotives, which were both MTH Amtrak F40’s with all electrons removed and a bridge rectifier wired. I recall both were saturated with gummy grease. There was one hopper car. No caboose, no passenger cars. I recall it also wasn’t just a flat green board with grass mat or something. It had nice scenery with hills and stuff. It came without the coin, ticket, and whatever control hardware. For sure no circuit boards with dip switches. I remember it was an all day ordeal to get this thing, load it, get it to the store, unload, and get it in, and THEN reality set in that he bought this over built worn out starter set layout that needed an overhaul anyway. We had a good laugh that the hopper and this kit of spare bulbs were the only decent parts of the whole package. Here’s a picture of what I was paid for my labor that day. I still use it for accessory bulbs. The plastic case shown reads “Chuck E Cheese’s spare parts kit”.

Attachments

Photos (1)

That game would be extremely rare in private hands as modern era C.E.C. doesn't ever sell old equipment , let alone C.E.C branded stuff (in the early days they did, then someone bought out a remodel, and used it to compete in a business across the street).

Old games are supposed to be " destroyed beyond salvage and disposed of, picture taken of the dispos, and submitted to home office. They might request parts removal for use at another store; not often.  I.e. this was either a dumpster dive/dump find, theft, or the tech might have been fired over it.

I don't think there were even 4 privately owned C.E.C.s by 2005, most are corp. owned.

"Still trying to not shoot my eye out"

 

"Nursing insomnia one railcar at a time"

My aroma therapy? Smoke Pellets.

 





I played one of those as a kid, i believe it was in conroe tx. i thought it was really impressive at the time, and far more unique than the arcade machines and skiball slides surrounding it, but it didn’t give out a lot of tickets. i always wondered what it was called. oddly, the one i used had a steam locomotive, although that could have been a replacement.

Replacement loco type likely wouldn't be a CEC corp. concern, though they may require RR logo removal to be "safe". They are very copywrite and trademark and licence conscious. They are not "original parts" oriented either, encouraging capable techs to improve things if possible.

The nature of game payout is highly variable on skill games. This is likely set up more for fun running by the youngest kids vs an actual skill challenge for max payout. The averaging system addresses a minimum of sorts for kids without skills, nobody goes home with "nothing" is the goal. Age groups stick to certain types of games unless one has a payout weakness, then the teens will line up to exploit it ,.... naturally 😁  So basically kiddie games have a high min, low max, real skill pays low for fail but high for success.   I think the odds are very fair under a good Manager that follows the rules.

I think the regional tech for the midwest had Lionels as a kid....(lunch talk of decades ago) Him whipping up this design for fun wouldn't be a big surprise at all. ... I wonder who (name) did it?

"Still trying to not shoot my eye out"

 

"Nursing insomnia one railcar at a time"

My aroma therapy? Smoke Pellets.

 





Add Reply

Post
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
×