For all, especially those in Texas panhandle, Kansas, North Texas/Oklahoma:     I am certain you are aware of the HIGH risks involving the severe weather forecast for Monday and Tuesday in our region.  9 out of 10 for twisters, large sized and long tracking; 4 out of 5 for floods and golf ball/baseball size hail, 60 mph plus straight line winds.   Not the first time, wont be the last...…  Have had too many F3s and two F5s pass within a couple miles of our property in Tuttle, on the way, eventually, to Moore.   Here is praying and best wishes for all in the Forum when Mother Nature rears an ugly attitude.   Tom, keep safe in Amarillo, you are first to experience the effects from what I have seen.  All those in Oklahoma and North Texas, take care and be aware.   For all others, we always know the effects severe weather can have on our hobby, our passion, our inventory of what we cherish.  But above all, Lord God, watch over our loved ones and fellow enthusiasts, keep us in your care and loving arms.

Jesse   TCA  12-68275 

Original Post

Here in CA weather generally isn't a problem.  It is good most days.  We don't get hurricanes, tornadoes, or many thunder storms.  The snow and ice stays in the mountains.  Most Californians who want snow have to drive to it.  

Earthquakes, fierce fires, earth slides, drought and flooding in the river basins are another story.  Fortunately these things don't happen often but they can be devastating over a wide area.   Several large and impressive train collections were lost during last year's fires.

I hope that everyone who might be affected by severe weather comes through it OK.

NH Joe

 

We mostly get tornadoes, including a famous one in 1974?  They do show up at odd places, on occasion, including Colorado Springs, California, and New England.  Seen a few up close and personal, that were near misses.   Hope this outburst stays in the open fields.  Don't need any.

??Another one of THOSE!!??  What you want to sell is not what I want to buy!

Yes, we take them very seriously.  The f5 on May 3, 1999 hit Moore, after near Tuttle and Bridge Creek (home of some Oklahoma Railroad Museum members).  That storm took some 50 plus lives, destroyed over 500 homes.  The May 20, 2013 f5 through Moore hit two elementary schools, 29 young lives lost.  The total was over 35 lives lost, more than 300 homes destroyed, hospital, so much more.  Same day Bridge Creek had same storm, f3 stage, pass through town.  The day we had flooding and a mesocyclone over the house, May 13, 2015, Bridge Creek had an f3 and f2 pass through, two miles from our property.  And so it goes...…..  People asked us why we moved to Oklahoma from Missouri Lake of The Ozarks.  Because we love the state, the people, and it just got too dang crowded on the lake!  LOL!!  I had my collection flooded in Houston, Texas in June 2001.. over 4 ft water in house.. managed to save 95% from loss and damage.  It really does not matter where you live.... live life to the fullest running trains and trusting in The Lord.  Have the shelter dry, clean, and stocked with first aid kit, water, and new bottle Riesling.  I have also added in my Henry Big Boy 45-70, Circuit Judge 45LC/410, all in hard cases along with others, ammo in water tight cases for 45-70, 45LC, 410, 44 Special, 556 with extra clips.  Yes, we have the largest shelter we could get when 3 car garage and upstairs train room was added on.

Jesse   TCA  12-68275

Ryan, yes, I know and agree with you 100%.  After they pass through Texas and Oklahoma, everyone East has to bite the bullet.  Tonight, the list of closings of schools, businesses, Tinker AFB, the OKC streetcar service, etc. grows longer with each update.  Hope we do not get the 6-8 inches rain predicted.  Our pond is already at the banks with almost 12" rains for past week, do not need Koi floating out the over-flow pipe!    Tom, good idea, running trains tonight and praying for the graces and protection of Our Heavenly Father.

Jesse    TCA

texastrain posted:

Yes, we take them very seriously.  The f5 on May 3, 1999 hit Moore, after near Tuttle and Bridge Creek (home of some Oklahoma Railroad Museum members).  That storm took some 50 plus lives, destroyed over 500 homes.  The May 20, 2013 f5 through Moore hit two elementary schools, 29 young lives lost.  The total was over 35 lives lost, more than 300 homes destroyed, hospital, so much more.  Same day Bridge Creek had same storm, f3 stage, pass through town.  The day we had flooding and a mesocyclone over the house, May 13, 2015, Bridge Creek had an f3 and f2 pass through, two miles from our property.  And so it goes...…..  People asked us why we moved to Oklahoma from Missouri Lake of The Ozarks.  Because we love the state, the people, and it just got too dang crowded on the lake!  LOL!!  I had my collection flooded in Houston, Texas in June 2001.. over 4 ft water in house.. managed to save 95% from loss and damage.  It really does not matter where you live.... live life to the fullest running trains and trusting in The Lord.  Have the shelter dry, clean, and stocked with first aid kit, water, and new bottle Riesling.  I have also added in my Henry Big Boy 45-70, Circuit Judge 45LC/410, all in hard cases along with others, ammo in water tight cases for 45-70, 45LC, 410, 44 Special, 556 with extra clips.  Yes, we have the largest shelter we could get when 3 car garage and upstairs train room was added on.

Jesse   TCA  12-68275

If you don’t have a basement, where do you go for somewhat safe shelter?

 

Mike

Mike, we have the biggest in ground storm shelter we could find.  Located in 3 car garage when it was built in 2009, along with second floor 26 x 32 ft train room above.

Rich, yes we love living here (some think we are crazy... hey, do play with trains....) and it is our Spring time ritual.  Tuttle has not had a twister hit since 1957, wish I could say same for Moore.  They have come too close in past ten years, but, ya gotta love it.  Never a dull moment!  We, too, will be praying for His protection over your son and grandsons.  Has been quiet in Tuttle, so far.  Too quiet...….

Jesse   TCA  12-68275

As of now, this time today, over seven reported twisters, damage from tornados and extremely high winds, heavy, flooding, rainfall.

Okay, I'll apologize first, I'm sorry. Now for the reasom, I skimmed through TexasTrain's post but only read the part where he said " We've had too many F3's and F5's pas within a couple of miles of our property" and thought to myself F3's??? You have F3's pass within a couple of miles of your property!! Great! But who is  still running F3's?? And what the heck is an F5? I never heard of a diesel designation of an F5, what the heck is that?. Then I kept reading, Duh!!! But one things for sure, I have a one track mind!! LOL Stay safe out there my friends.

Engines of any sort, steam, diesel or electric are just fascinating pieces of equipment.

ConRailFan, you are not the only one.  Not living in a tornado belt, my first quick scan had me thinking how cool to see F3's these days.  After it sunk in a second, I thought I don't want to see those kind of F3's.

Weather doesn't try to kill us very often in Vegas.  Praying for you, southern brothers of the rail.

Chris S.

Here at the house, we dodged severe damage from this storm, Jesse.  I'm thinking about heading over to Braums -- a business that only operates at locations within Tornado Alley" for a breakfast of southern plains comfort food.

Tom

 

Superintendent, High Plains Division (O Gauge) 

The Panhandle & Santa Fe Railway Co.

Lone Star Hi-Railers

Santa Fe, All the Way

ConrailFan posted:

And what the heck is an F5? I never heard of a diesel designation of an F5, what the heck is that?.

There was an intermediary model F5 between the late F3 and the first F7s. . . .  MoPac had some, but they just referred to them as F3s.

Frisco, MoPac, and T&P near Rolla, MO

We have had our fair share of near misses with hurricanes on this island. At one point we had three of them around Maui at one time. Makes for some long nights. Allan Miller suggested some good ideas for saving your trains and other valuables. Built elevated platforms under the layout and put your trains in those big plastic storage boxes with the top that locks closed. I got a Bunch of Pallets to get things off the floor. They were ready made and cost H-750nothing. I did buy the plastic boxes for all my trains that weren't on the layout. Last year we did have water come in the garage when a drain clogged. Thanks Allan for your good advice. Don

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All.... I suppose I owe a bit of an apology.... or a disclaimer, perhaps?   Yes, F3s and F5s, F7s, etc. should have clicked in my brain as motive power designations...…   Could have been more informative and correct using the rating term of EF3, EF5, etc. for Enhanced Fuchi scale.

Thanks to everyone expressing concern and well wishes.  One main intent of this post is to have us all pause and reflect, think upon what we all know may be the inevitable.  True, you can purchase insurance to replace.  But, the labors of love we exercise in building and maintaining our interests, the joy and excitement this endeavor gives to others, as well as ourselves,...…   There is no monetary value for these.  And as with the welfare and health of those we love, families and close friends, the loss of "our trains" can be more devastating to some, more than others.  Cherish each day of running and performing hands on interaction with your trains and layouts.  They are truly priceless in may ways.  

Jesse   TCA  12-68275

Chris, depends upon where you were yesterday.  Last I heard, there were 8, make that 12 with update, reported twisters in Oklahoma, the largest being an EF4 near the town of Mangum, in SW Okla.  There were several others, including in North Texas and Kansas.  Yes, people's homes were hit and damaged, if not totally destroyed.  Have not heard of any fatalities due to the storms.  Right now, even tonight, many are displaced due to the winds and major flooding.  The Cimarron River, North and South Canadian Rivers, numerous streams/creeks miles out of their banks.  More storms, some severe, are forecasted for Wed and Thurs.  The most of what we do not need is more rain.  The state Oklahoma is now close to a foot above normal for this time of year.  It has been an extra wet year in many parts of the nation, has it not?  From last nights storms, my rain gauges show close to 4 inches, another 4 1/2 inches.  The mentioned rivers have yet to crest, just heard on tonight's news. Also, one reported death due to someone driving around a barricade closing the road.  The worst we had on our property was the Koi pond going over it's banks, but the yard flooding is down with my French drains doing what they can to handle it.  The creek behind our property is full and flowing fast to the North Canadian River.  Yes, prayers were answered by the fact, against all computer projections, the cold front proved more powerful and push the warm front South.  Should the warm front had prevailed, the additional high temps and humidity/moisture, would have fueled the super-cells and larger hail, stronger, more numerous twisters would have been the rule of the day.  We do give thanks to where it is deserved, counting our blessings. 

As with others, what we have in our trains is tied to memories, past loved ones, lessons from our youth.  For myself, the majority of my PW Lionel is from my youth, collected and operated on layouts by my father and I.  My first ever Lionel set, and four additional before I graduated from high school, are still together and operational.  The two years before my father's passing at young age of 53, he and I went on a "binge" and every weekend we were visiting local flea markets, dealers and shops in Houston for more trains.  Now, they are still together and get an occasional running, my father looking over my shoulder and smiling.

Jesse 

 

 

Thanks for the update Jesse, I love getting the news from a local, has that personal touch.  National news does not seem to do the smaller towns justice unless there is a major loss.  Vegas could sure use some of that water, but not the volume you are getting.  All affected remain in my prayers.

Chris S.

Good morning, Chris       I agree, national news, and the Weather Channel, do not give coverage of events affecting a very large percentage of our nation's citizens.  Seems like if it doesn't happen around New York, Chicago, or L.A., the coverage is very short, incorrect most likely, or non-existent.  But, I suppose that is to be expected.  I understand the term "fly over states" quite well.  Before retirement I traveled extensively all over our country, both coasts and North/South.  Yes, Vegas is a dry place.  When managing sites in the Fallon area, I visited my aunt living in Pahrump more than once.  No, never went to the Chicken Ranch!  But, the flash floods in desert areas are catastrophic, have seen more than one, myself.

Whatever divisions in geographics or other criteria exist in America, the common bonds of faith and caring will always pull us through, transcend all other factors, and modeling of railroads is a very strong adhesive receiving too little gratitude, also.  There is always a much wider, greater world outside one's own "space" and beyond the blue screen.

Thank you, Chris, and God bless

Jesse   TCA  12-68275 

There were at least two tornados nearby in MO, including one 14 miles south of my office.

:shrug:  Missouri in the Spring.  Hardly newsworthy.  And who cares (other than those who live there) what weather New York or Los Angeles is getting?  Or here, for that matter. 

The various channels, especially the ones that make weather their bread and butter, claim to be raising "weather preparedness."  What they are doing is raising weather panic.  We had people calling in asking if we were cancelling last night's classes because of the weather.  Really?  Thunderstorms in the Spring?  Like that's never happened before.

Frisco, MoPac, and T&P near Rolla, MO

For the past few years, Metra, the Chicago-area commuter agency, has instituted a 'weather stop' or 'high winds stop' for its commuter trains. My train has been caught in such a stop a few times - formerly, it just barreled through a storm.  A conductor on my line said this was the UP's direction after a derecho derailed a short freight on their Harvard sub. There's a video - I think this is it: https://youtu.be/xs3RjohKSPk

Palallin,    I agree, it is Spring time in the land where we live.   My point is, the effects outside forces have on each one of us, our passion and hobby.   Yes, we each deal with it in our own way.  One manner to do so is to contact others in your region and inform, request the power of prayer.  I am daily surprised, today included, in the amount of individuals unaware of what goes on around them, and does impact them.  Some say "duh" and some blame others, especially the government.  Yes, well aware of twisters in Missouri, witnessed them and the aftermath when living at Lake of The Ozarks, Linn Creek, and driving, managing sites in Oklahoma, later in Indiana.  Just as pointed out by NH Joe and the collections, layouts (hopefully no owners of these) in the fires California experiences.  No matter where you live, your have effects from whatever is in your region.  And, no matter where you be from, we all care for one another, have concerns about safety and well being of others.  Yes, Spring time in Missouri can get very hairy, time to time.  And, yes, it seems people do not, in general, deal with and handle extreme weather as well as use to.  I am certain, you too, recall the days before doppler radar and you watched the sky to let you know what was coming.  I know I do, most when visiting kin in South Central Kansas when growing up.  Yes, as the same with any RR Crossing, you learn to give the proper respect to any danger you encounter, whatever the source.

Jesse   TCA

I would never minimize the pain and heartache that actual victims of natural disasters experience.  I have helped in tornado clean-up, and I have seen the costs.

What bothers me is the sensationalization of the weather and the benefits reaped by the media who engage in it as well as the pointless panic that they cause.

Frisco, MoPac, and T&P near Rolla, MO

True, sir.   I would never think of your minimalizing any tragic events of any nature.  The current media, as in the past, is most about ratings and the monetary that follows.  Have studied newspapers and information from the 19th century.  What we have today would pale in some of the "truth"  reported back in those times.  Same as with the establishment of the many railroads across America in the late 1800's.  Congress was eager to build them and gave away millions of acres to expedite the growth of railroads.  To the point, many false companies arose and sold shares of non-existent endeavors.  The bribery of Congressional members by "scoundrels" with "stocks and bonds" for railroads was very rampant and the extent of it was so far greater than anything today.  But, the reporting of events does not concern facts so much as it does, and ever has, ratings and wealth obtained.

A very interesting book about the establishment of railroads in 1800's America is titled "Hear That Lonesome Whistle Blow".  I recommend to all that may have interest in subject of railroads.  An eye opening publication of true events and information.

Jesse   TCA  12-68275

Sometimes there can be mildly humorous moments when severe weather is near.

Around 2005, the Lubbock Trainmaster and I were out on the railroad near Muleshoe, testing crews.  We had shunted the track to cause an intermediate block signal to display a Stop and Proceed indication, and were not expecting anything other than proper compliance with rules.  The sky was grey, and low clouds had been scudding past rather rapidly and there was a 20 MPH wind.  About 10 minutes into our wait for the next train, rain began, very lightly, but at an angle, and at that very time, a vehicle that looked like a Buck Rogers space ship drove past on the adjacent highway.  For those of you not familiar with tornado alley, that is definitely a storm chaser, and he would not have been there if he did not expect a tornado to likely touch down in the area.  The Trainmaster and I looked at each other, immediately headed toward our track shunt to retrieve it, and agreed that it must be green chile stew day for us, at Clovis, oh yes, definitely, how could we have forgotten to properly celebrate such an important day.

If you ever see one of those storm chase vehicles on your highway you are probably in the wrong place and have also forgotten that it's green chile stew day, far from there.  

Tom

 

Superintendent, High Plains Division (O Gauge) 

The Panhandle & Santa Fe Railway Co.

Lone Star Hi-Railers

Santa Fe, All the Way

Number 90 posted:

Sometimes there can be mildly humorous moments when severe weather is near.

Around 2005, the Lubbock Trainmaster and I were out on the railroad near Muleshoe, testing crews.  We had shunted the track to cause an intermediate block signal to display a Stop and Proceed indication, and were not expecting anything other than proper compliance with rules.  The sky was grey, and low clouds had been scudding past rather rapidly and there was a 20 MPH wind.  About 10 minutes into our wait for the next train, rain began, very lightly, but at an angle, and at that very time, a vehicle that looked like a Buck Rogers space ship drove past on the adjacent highway.  For those of you not familiar with tornado alley, that is definitely a storm chaser, and he would not have been there if he did not expect a tornado to likely touch down in the area.  The Trainmaster and I looked at each other, immediately headed toward our track shunt to retrieve it, and agreed that it must be green chile stew day for us, at Clovis, oh yes, definitely, how could we have forgotten to properly celebrate such an important day.

If you ever see one of those storm chase vehicles on your highway you are probably in the wrong place and have also forgotten that it's green chile stew day, far from there.  

When I lived and worked in the Texas/Oklahoma Panhandle area, I saw the storm chasers all the time in the spring.  Going home at the end of the day I did not mind them as they passed me on the highway if they were heading away for my home town.  I did not like it when the storm chasers past me at a high rate of speed going toward my home town and the sky's were dark near my home town.

Keith Johnson

Yes, Springtime in Texas and Oklahoma, all over the Midwest... gotta love it!!   Watching the 24 hr weather on local tv, regular programing is preempted with storms passing tonight.  At 9:15 had a "rotation" pass over our house/property, including local power flashes.  Power went out, but was back on in couple minutes, rest of street still dark.  "Rotation" had lowering as it moved NE over Will Rogers Airport, into downtown OKC, etc.  And plenty of more rain...….     Gotta LOVE IT !!!

Have made friends with Fox Network storm chaser, Chris Hynes, get great weather pics with scripture each morning over my wife's and my texts.  Some have been great pics of train consists he photographs.

Jesse   TCA   12-68275

Tom, you lucky dog!   Saw on weather now Amarillo is in an "enhanced" region for severe storms tomorrow, into Sunday morning.  Keep your head down and we are keeping you and Marge in our prayers, sir.

Yeah, they are "out there".....  TV weather spotter showing power pole and lines down on live camera.  Fool in pickup drives up to it and runs right over it!!  Gotta LOVE it!!!   Most likely same type of fella that runs around crossing gates in down position...!!

Jesse

Tom,  Saw Amarillo had high winds and other severe weather pass through yesterday.  Hope all is good and even though this coming week is to be busy, we pray this will be ending soon.  Tuttle had sirens going off twice Sat. night, spent our share of time in the shelter, listening to NOAA to keep abreast of the storms that did hit and caused too much damage, took too many lives.

Take care, fella, you and your Lady, God bless

Jesse

Where I live monroe n.c. we get tornadoes strong ones ef2 or ef3 and once in a while a ef4.We get hurricanes to thou we live almost 200 miles from the beach.I thought we were safe from hurricanes.That is until hurrican hugo.Ever since then I am more careful now.So to all those who live out in the midwest.I hope every body come out all right.

Ohio is under the gun again.  Last night an EF-3 tornado struck Celina, which is about a half hour south of our place.  Over 40 homes damaged or destroyed.  One dead and seven injured.  I was tracking this storm as it came across Indiana.  If it had shifted slightly to the north it would have hit here.  Had some strong storm go through this evening, but they were mostly rain.  Another round is forecast for Thursday.  Going to keep an eye to the sky the next few days.

Tom

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