Thanks Jim,

  Very interesting! Unusual to see the inside of the tops of the towers and how well built the bridge is...looks like it can easily make another 100 years. The 100 year anniversary was March 9,1917. 

Here is a link to a New York Times piece on the anniversary:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/0...mbies-turns-100.html

Hell Gate Bridge Times article

 

Tom

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Neat video!

Somewhere (not on this PC) I have a half decent distant pic from a vantage point no longer possible.  The shot was from the Skyfari attraction at the Bronx Zoo (removed about 10 years ago).  I'll look for it after York and post if I can find it.

-Dave

J 611 posted:

God, annoying that the graffiti "artists" have managed to tag the stone all the way at the top of the bridge. 

 

Indeed.  Catch 'em and make them scrub it off . . . with their own toothbrushes.  And then make them kill the grass and shrubs growing at the top.

That light in the middle is one bulb I would NOT want to change . . . .

Frisco, MoPac, and T&P near Rolla, MO

I stumbled upon this article in the Washington Post from May 26, 1907, talking about the big plans for the soon to be built Hell Gate Bridge. The article mentions then vice president Samuel Rea. Rea would go on to later serve as the Pennsy's ninth president, from 1913 to 1925. 

Hell Gate Bridge Plans

Tom 

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J 611 posted:

God, annoying that the graffiti "artists" have managed to tag the stone all the way at the top of the bridge. 

 

They are NOT "Artists" they are Hooligans , and their punishment, if caught, should be that they have to clean up 100 pieces of that "mess" for every one they create.

Simon

Interesting that the three tracks are displaced to one side. Was there a fourth track originally?

It looks to me like the concrete blocks on the tops of the towers are missing some of their grouting, although that is probably not the correct term.

RoyBoy

RoyBoy posted:

Interesting that the three tracks are displaced to one side. Was there a fourth track originally?

It looks to me like the concrete blocks on the tops of the towers are missing some of their grouting, although that is probably not the correct term.

According to that neat article Tom posted (thanks Tom!), it was planned with 4 tracks.

I don't personally know if that plan evolved as being built, but the article says it was designed with 4 tracks.

-Dave

The bridge originally had 4 tracks, all with catenary.  These tracks split in Queens with 2 headed to Penn via Sunnyside and the other 2 going to Fresh Pond to interchange with the Long Island.  The freight tracks had catenary all the way to Fresh Pond.  I remember watching 100+ car freight trains on the bridge being pulled by box cab electrics and electrics that looked like a diesel (I didn’t know what a EF3b until later).  There was a set of crossovers just before the split that allowed routing trains to any of the 4 tracks, if necessary.  With the advent of Amtrak, only the 2 tracks leading to Penn were needed.  The crossovers were removed and the catenary taken down on the freight line.  With seriously reduced freight traffic, the rails were removed from one of the freight tracks.  I worked across from the split for the last 20 years and crossed the Triborough bridge twice a day.  I only noted 2 freights per day; southbound in the AM and northbound in the PM.  I remember when they painted it dark red.  It was a big improvement over the rust red and grimy black.  Within about 3 years it began to fade and oxidize to pink and, today, it is a nondescript grayish white with a hint of red.

Dan

RoyBoy posted:

Interesting that the three tracks are displaced to one side. Was there a fourth track originally?

Originally had 4 tracks. The 4th track, mainly a freight track, was abandoned I believe in the 1970s. (Please ignore the idiot kid and whoever posed him in that spot! )

hgb

Jim

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