Okay, so I was visiting a local O scale two rail layout, and the owner had two Weaver GP38-2s running. He had detailed them very nicely, and they looked nothing like the basic models they came as. Many years ago my dad purchased three of these engines decorated in Conrail, and I too plan on detailing mine. In order to get started on this, the handrails need to be repainted to blue rather than their current black. These handrails are made out of delrin plastic, so if I paint them with Floquil in a traditional manner, the paint would just rub off. Would a layer of Testors Dull Coat be enough to rough them up? 

Original Post
rattler21 posted:

Strip the piece, wash it with dish washing soap, thoroughly rinse, dry it over night, apply a good prime coat,  make sure your paint is the proper temperature and apply it.   John

I was thinking of RustOleum Automotive Primer (spray cans), which should "bite" into the handrails.

There is a flexible parts primer - NAPA # 7223 - supposed to be good for Delrin or any other acetal plastic.

Then again, a Weaver engine - I'd just replace all of the handrails with brass parts from P&D Hobby and get away from the Delrin by using nicer parts from the the start. 


There are many mysteries in this universe, big and small. Like, why do clowns make us laugh? Why do we love puppy dogs? And why, why do little blue midgets hit me with fish?

mwb posted:

There is a flexible parts primer - NAPA # 7223 - supposed to be good for Delrin or any other acetal plastic.

Then again, a Weaver engine - I'd just replace all of the handrails with brass parts from P&D Hobby and get away from the Delrin by using nicer parts from the the start. 

When I was searching for detail parts I noticed that Des Plaines Hobbies stocks handrails specifically made for Weaver GP38s, $34.95 a piece X four engines = $139.80!!! Money I'd rather spend on N scale stuff considering that I plan on getting away from O scale later in life. How does the P&D Hobby product go in terms of price? But in any case, thanks for the product number, I'll do a search for that.

Steven Michael posted:

When I was searching for detail parts I noticed that Des Plaines Hobbies stocks handrails specifically made for Weaver GP38s, $34.95 a piece X four engines = $139.80!!! Money I'd rather spend on N scale stuff considering that I plan on getting away from O scale later in life. .

You're heading the wrong direction. You should consider moving from N to O later in life. You know, as your vision goes. 

Steven Michael posted:

... These handrails are made out of delrin plastic, so if I paint them with Floquil in a traditional manner, the paint would just rub off...

If you do a less than perfect job, or if it flakes off, you will be disappointed with the results. If you want to try painting Delrin, suggest you practice on an item of lesser value first.

breezinup posted:
Steven Michael posted:

When I was searching for detail parts I noticed that Des Plaines Hobbies stocks handrails specifically made for Weaver GP38s, $34.95 a piece X four engines = $139.80!!! Money I'd rather spend on N scale stuff considering that I plan on getting away from O scale later in life. .

You're heading the wrong direction. You should consider moving from N to O later in life. You know, as your vision goes. 

No lol. I am sick of training wheels and lobster claws!

Steven Michael posted:
mwb posted:

There is a flexible parts primer - NAPA # 7223 - supposed to be good for Delrin or any other acetal plastic.

Then again, a Weaver engine - I'd just replace all of the handrails with brass parts from P&D Hobby and get away from the Delrin by using nicer parts from the the start. 

When I was searching for detail parts I noticed that Des Plaines Hobbies stocks handrails specifically made for Weaver GP38s, $34.95 a piece X four engines = $139.80!!! Money I'd rather spend on N scale stuff considering that I plan on getting away from O scale later in life. How does the P&D Hobby product go in terms of price? But in any case, thanks for the product number, I'll do a search for that.

No one said to do all 4 engines at once; don't go and cheap out on stuff - do it right.  One the 1st things I did when I got my 1st Weaver RS3 was to replace the handrails and all of the other flimsy parts - stuff you handle inadvertently slowly gets damaged over time.  Having it more robust insures a long time better quality model for your enjoyment.

Then again, if you are just going to go to N later, maybe you should just sell off the O now and move on...

And, you etter start saving for that N scale stuff now.  It's surprisingly pricy stuff and just because the size shrinks, the price tag doesn't,


There are many mysteries in this universe, big and small. Like, why do clowns make us laugh? Why do we love puppy dogs? And why, why do little blue midgets hit me with fish?

When it comes to painting any sort of plastic that you don't know the adhesion properties of, or where you can not properly prep the surface, what you want is an adhesion promoter.  I prefer the sort that is applied separately from primer and dries clear, not the all in one sort. 

I have never used the low cost options such as Dupli-Color, so I don't know how they compare to SEM or 3M's product, but I expect it is good enough for the job.  The name brands cost around $25 for a spray can, but one can lasted months in an auto body shop, it will probably last a lifetime spraying an occasional engine shell.  

After applying the adhesion promoter, if you choose to use a primer, I recommend you use one specifically intended for things like plastic models.  Automotive primer is fantastic for its intended purpose, but it will hide details on models.  Automotive primer is designed to bridge small scratches and fill uneven surfaces, then to be sanded flat, which is not desirable if you want to preserve fine details.  

One last note, Prep work is important.  make sure the parts to be painted are absolutely clean.  You can buy 'wax and grease' removers at auto parts/auto paint stores, but for something like a couple of small engine parts, cleaning with soap and water, rinsing VERY throughly, then letting dry completely will probably be enough to insure a good bond.  Once the parts are cleaned, they should not be handled with bare hands... wear gloves.  

And yes, I understand that there is a difference in the process required to get satisfactory results for a model train engine versus a high-end, show quality, automotive finish, but taking your time and doing it right the first time will make for a better, longer lasting, finish on anything.  

JGL

 

$ This is John Galt speaking.  $

“I swear by my life and my love of it that I will never live for the sake of another man, nor ask another man to live for mine.” 

 

 

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