Led lights

185A6FF8-5071-4AAE-BC50-D5DED71A8C2Ecan someone help me with this spool of lights -  I know I can cut them every three but what from there -  I guess you can solder wires to one end of a set of three and then to a power source?  Before I broke them up wanted to be sure of what I was doing 

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Original Post

Yes you cut them at the solder pads which are every three leds. They sell connectors for the cut sections, or you solder wires onto those pads that are left.

I soldered mine with wires to use inside of my passenger cars. I put them on circuits to prevent over powering them and to control their brightness.

There are plenty of posts about this in the electrical forum. Henning's trains sells a control board for inside of cars too.

" on Sour mash and cheap wine " ??

Why go back to DCC when I have DCS!

Those look like the bright LED's, if you're using them for passenger cars, they're gonna' be pretty bright!   I use the 3528 LED strips, those look like the 5050 LED's.  They consume more power than the 3528 strips, and will be much brighter.

Okay - the electrical part of this hobby is not my thing so bear with me.    

Some more facts for you....

using them for buildings not passenger cars 

they are warm white yes they appear to be 5050

I have attached a picture of a power supply I found lying around -  it lights them up  but wanted to be sure it was enough over time    What am I looking for to determine that?

lights are 12v

my plan is to cut lights appropriate for building (in 3’s)  then clip or solder wires and run to next building - repeat at next building etc and power all with this one source

John - sure I would like to try those clips if you have excess     Let me know how much?

Thanks 

michael

 

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msp posted:

...

I have attached a picture of a power supply I found lying around -  it lights them up  but wanted to be sure it was enough over time    What am I looking for to determine that? 

I'm not seeing the photo.  If you do post one, useful if we can read the make/model or any labeling referring to Volts, Amps, Watts and the like.

The LED strip connectors are easy to use and provide reliable connections, at least in my experience.  The connectors require no soldering to attach to the strip, just snap the lid closed like a clam shell.  They are inexpensive on the bay.  I tend to use individual LEDs to light my buildings.  I use the strips where I desire uniform lighting like for loading docks, subway platforms, etc.  I haven't branched out to passenger cars yet but that is another application.   Follow GRJ advise on brightness and color temperature.  I would do a test run in one of your building to make sure you're getting the desired effect.

Steve

From what I can tell from your LED strip manufacturer's website, your 5-meter (300 LEDs, 100 3-LED segments) 5050 LED strip consumes 40 Watts...or 8 Watts per meter.

Your 12V power adapter can supply 750 mA or 0.75 Amps.  Watts = Volts x Amps, so that's "only" 9 Watts.

So your adapter can power about 1 meter of your 5 meter strip.  That's about 60 LEDs or 20 3-LED segments. 

If you look at the manufacturer website they recommend a 60 Watt power supply adapter.

shorling posted:

TheLED strip connectors are easy to use and provide reliable connections, at least in my experience. 

Steve, do you have a link to the connectors?

I try to stay current with the LED discussion, especially when GRJ or Stan are supplying the data/info.  But I've been off the forum for a while and missed that one.

Thanks.

 

Carl

Ok guys - I’m pumped up second kit I have built first installation of lights

let me know what you think -  first off it might be a little bright.   Actually looks brighter in pic than in real life 

other than that I would love feedback.  Yes there will be a background to cover up shelving.  

That is 15 0f those 5050’s across the top 

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Pingman posted:
shorling posted:

TheLED strip connectors are easy to use and provide reliable connections, at least in my experience. 

Steve, do you have a link to the connectors?

I try to stay current with the LED discussion, especially when GRJ or Stan are supplying the data/info.  But I've been off the forum for a while and missed that one.

Thanks.

Here's a few:

f:0" target="_blank">https://www.ebay.com/itm/10X-F...Swr8xaAohb:rk:3f:0

There were a lot of choices

 

Steve

msp posted:

Ok guys - I’m pumped up second kit I have built first installation of lights

let me know what you think -  first off it might be a little bright.   Actually looks brighter in pic than in real life 

other than that I would love feedback.  Yes there will be a background to cover up shelving.  

That is 15 0f those 5050’s across the top 

Looks great, I have one recommendation.  Arrange to have a few windows dark and maybe reduce the intensity of the lighting in a couple to simulate real life.

there is another thread discussion about using too much power on a menders building.   As stan2004 pointed out above...a certain power source will supply power to a certain number of lights....do i need to make sure to use the full number of lights in other words...if I use a string of less lights than my power source is capable of supplying do i run a risk of overpower and blowing them.

 

Hope that makes sense.

msp posted:

there is another thread discussion about using too much power on a menders building.   As stan2004 pointed out above...a certain power source will supply power to a certain number of lights....do i need to make sure to use the full number of lights in other words...if I use a string of less lights than my power source is capable of supplying do i run a risk of overpower and blowing them.

 Hope that makes sense.

No, the voltage is fixed, and only the current required for the existing lights will be used.  It's the same as if you plug a 15 watt lamp into your 120V socket at home.  The socket can supply up to around 1800 watts, but it only supplies enough power to light the 15 watt lamp.

There is no danger unless you supply the wrong voltage.  The Menards buildings are rated for 4.5 VDC.  If you connect a 4.5 VDC power supply with a 1,000 amp capability, the building will work fine with no damage.  When you're connecting power to devices, you have to be mindful of the voltage rating of the device. 

Correct, they want 4.5 VDC, AC is NOT a good idea.  Obviously, you can run the power supply from AC, it just needs to provide DC to the load.

msp posted:

so what is the difference with a power source to a Menards building?  Why is there a danger of supplying to much power to that?

If you were researching earlier OGR threads about LED building lighting, a couple years ago there was a spirited discussion about power supplies for Menards buildings.  As the guys state above, the Menards buildings expect 4.5V DC.  But the power adapters Menards sold were of the unregulated ilk; with no buildings or only a few small buildings attached the voltage would be substantially higher than 4.5V and guys were reporting building failures.  Menards pulled the power adapters from the shelves and for several months you couldn't buy a Menards adapter.  They re-introduced adapters of the regulated ilk; these put out 4.5V irrespective of what was attached (within the power capability).

Using the search term “4.5vdc power supply” will show you a large number of options from $3 to $20 or more.  So pick the one(s) you like with “free shipping” added in, I suggest.  Also, to Stan’s point above, at the necessary 4.5vdc, pick an amperage that will power all the leds(buildings) you want with the least number of units.  I would think a minimum of 1 Amp(1000mA) per power supply.  Depends on the buildings but as has been reported the building requirements on current vary.  Some buildings with variable signs and the like might require up to 5A supplies.  In my application, I use a single power supply to terminal strips, then use buck converters to regulate each(or more) buildings to suit my taste.  Which runs much less bright than yours BTW.  So make your best deal and “go to town”.

 Ted

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