This is a new post on my MTH 30-1152-1 RailKing Reading Crusader. 

I replaced the older battery with a BCR. The locomotive seems to run fine. 
The main issue now is intermittent chuffing. To get the chuffing working, I have to supply a higher voltage. When I throttle down, the chuff either stops or stutters. I checked the wiring and can’t see anything loose.

Horn and bell work fine. I figured I’d let the experts here have a crack before I take her in. This is original protosound.

 Thanks 😊 

Original Post
gunrunnerjohn posted:

Take a look at the RK Reading Crusader User Manual.  You might first try a Reset-18, that's on page 23.  Next, perhaps try adjusting the Chuff Rate, that's on page 22.

I’ll definitely try the reset but I thought you’d need a Z-4000 transformer to adjust the chuff rate. The reset is the same number of clinks and clanks as resetting the PFA: 5 clanks 3 clinks. 

😊 

It sounds like this might be an early (<1998) PS1.  If you're using a chopped-wave power supply, intermittent or varied chuff rate is a known problem.  You would have to use a sine-wave transformer, or put a 150uF NON-POLAR capacitor across the output of your transformer to smooth the waveform.

It is possible to adjust the chuff rate, but as I remember the procedure involves applying power while holding the loco back, etc.  That's pretty hard on the motor and tires!!

Creep, coast, and pull.  We're not talking about cold fusion here.

Ted S posted:

It sounds like this might be an early (<1998) PS1.  If you're using a chopped-wave power supply, intermittent or varied chuff rate is a known problem.  You would have to use a sine-wave transformer, or put a 150uF NON-POLAR capacitor across the output of your transformer to smooth the waveform.

It is possible to adjust the chuff rate, but as I remember the procedure involves applying power while holding the loco back, etc.  That's pretty hard on the motor and tires!!

I’m using an MTH z-1000. I guess I’m not sure what a chopped-wave power supply is. 
Good info. I’m just not sure about that level of technical detail but I’ll research it.

 Thanks 😊 

The MTH MTH 30-1152-1 Reading Crusader was delivered Dec 1999, and was some of the last PS/1 engines, so it probably doesn't have early electronics.  It should run fine with the Z-1000.  Mine did before I ripped everything out and upgraded it to TMCC.

Ted S posted:

It sounds like this might be an early (<1998) PS1.  If you're using a chopped-wave power supply, intermittent or varied chuff rate is a known problem.  You would have to use a sine-wave transformer, or put a 150uF NON-POLAR capacitor across the output of your transformer to smooth the waveform.

It is possible to adjust the chuff rate, but as I remember the procedure involves applying power while holding the loco back, etc.  That's pretty hard on the motor and tires!!

Ted S

You’ve hit the nail on the head. I tried my old K-Line transformer and the chuff rate is once again normal.

Oddly enough, when I first got the train, I ran it using the MTH that first night and it was fine. Next day, it was echoing and off rate and I couldn’t figure out why. I put in a BCR because I thought that would help.

You’ve saved me lots of frustration and a trip to the Hobby Store!

Many thanks!

Ted S posted:

It sounds like this might be an early (<1998) PS1.  If you're using a chopped-wave power supply, intermittent or varied chuff rate is a known problem.  You would have to use a sine-wave transformer, or put a 150uF NON-POLAR capacitor across the output of your transformer to smooth the waveform.

It is possible to adjust the chuff rate, but as I remember the procedure involves applying power while holding the loco back, etc.  That's pretty hard on the motor and tires!!

Ted,

My old K-Line transformer worked for 1 iteration and when I went back and tried again the intermittent chuffing returned. It’s almost as though the engine is adjusting to the transformer for a short while and then reverts back.

What is involved in adding the capacitor to convert the transformer to sine wave?

Also, my ancient 1964 Lionel transformer works great with this engine. Chuffs just fine. Only 1 bell button so I cant work the whistle with it.

 

 Thanks 😊 

You just have to bridge the hot and ground at the transformer output with a 150uF to 200uF NON-POLAR capacitor.  Don't use a regular cap or it will explode!  A metal enclosure is advised.

Creep, coast, and pull.  We're not talking about cold fusion here.

Ted S posted:

You just have to bridge the hot and ground at the transformer output with a 150uF to 200uF NON-POLAR capacitor.  Don't use a regular cap or it will explode!  A metal enclosure is advised.

I think I’m just going with an MRC transformer in the interim. It’s advertised as pure sine wave so I assume that will solve the chuffing issue.

 Thanks 

The capacitive reactance of a 150uf capacitor across 60hz is around 17 ohms.  That will generate a lot of heat in the capacitor, likely causing it to fail over time, not to mention it consuming over 8 watts just in the cap!  If you're going to use a capacitor, consider something more along the lines of a 10uf non-polarized cap, it accomplishes the same goal, but it's capacitive reactance is 265 ohms for  much lower heat generation and power consumption.

Yes it does generate a lot of heat, that's why I advised a metal enclosure.

Our train club in Texas did some experimenting with these in the late '90s, even monitoring the waveform on an oscilloscope.  I'm pretty sure we needed at least 150uF to obtain the needed smoothing.  We built a ventilated enclosure, and yes a couple of times we "let the smoke out!"  Whatever you do be careful!!

Creep, coast, and pull.  We're not talking about cold fusion here.

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