i had a lot of free time today, so i decided to repower an early, and broken, durham 0-4-0.

B9D5486F-AB1D-4C2E-A628-35FE9C20A702

it started innocently enough, i did a little mock up with a bunch of spares.26B42AF6-C448-401F-B574-4CB48BA5EA56

then i got the motor to fit right, witch was a job in itself, and built the rear truck. then decided to go with some bigger rear wheels. and spent far too long fashioning the pilot from scraps.

26E6A271-2890-47FF-B119-6971CE6A319E

with everything together i’d say it looks fairly respectable, although i still need to put together some drive rods, and a headlight, and tweak the pilot a little more.5CD7828B-C4BB-48EE-8EC1-979B5AB95815

320B4C08-3E6B-479E-BF75-5FFAAAE24E50

for reference, here’s a stock durham also in my collection. this one is a lot newer, but it looks mostly the same. although the older body i used doesn’t have a cutout for the brake lever like this one.

EDF05CFE-D31F-4867-B69F-2CC5287D386C

an interesting note is how much lower the body sits now, i think it looks nicer sitting lower, although i didn’t intend on it.

3EDE9192-5D6B-4ABF-92BF-E10D154470C7

if your curious about the tender in the first pic, it’s a marx with lionel trucks and an operating coupler i made a while back, i just thought it matched up nicely. i’ll post some more pics as i work on it, and probably some of the internals after i get everything perfected. 

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Last edited by Signalwoman
Original Post
Steve "Papa" Eastman posted:

There is a Facebook page dedicated to Durham trains.

Steve

 

i tried to find it, but i can’t seem to, you wouldn’t happen to know the full name would you?

Signalwoman posted:
Steve "Papa" Eastman posted:

There is a Facebook page dedicated to Durham trains.

Steve

 

i tried to find it, but i can’t seem to, you wouldn’t happen to know the full name would you?


Durham Toy Trains

Steve

Steve "Papa" Eastman

Yorba Linda, CA

Left Coast, Home of the lunatics

Well one mystery solved, and as usual more questions.

I have had this engine for years, and have no idea where it came from.  Obviously a Marx motor, but everything inside looks factory with no obvious modifications.  I looked at a Durham Trains page and nothing like it. Anyone got any ideas?

As to th OP, looks great.  If I saw it on a table at a show, it would be going home with me.20200227_17325020200227_17331220200227_17332520200227_173351mi

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OK mystery not solved.  Engine is very close but not a Durham.  Shorter, open cab windows, some different details.  Who dun it?

Okay...never before heard of Durham, and have worn out shoes hiking through train shows...more info, please, on THIS site, not avoidable ones.

??Another one of THOSE!!??  What you want to sell is not what I want to buy!

colorado hirailer posted:

Okay...never before heard of Durham, and have worn out shoes hiking through train shows...more info, please, on THIS site, not avoidable ones.


01690025-31EB-4CAF-A329-9FB2E7DF2ABE

this is my small collection.

Steve "Papa" Eastman

Yorba Linda, CA

Left Coast, Home of the lunatics

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NHVRYGray posted:

Well one mystery solved, and as usual more questions.

I have had this engine for years, and have no idea where it came from.  Obviously a Marx motor, but everything inside looks factory with no obvious modifications.  I looked at a Durham Trains page and nothing like it. Anyone got any ideas?

As to th OP, looks great.  If I saw it on a table at a show, it would be going home with me.20200227_17325020200227_17331220200227_17332520200227_173351mi

it is very similar to a durham, the motors used in a most durham trains were copys of marx motors, and can generally be swapped with slight modifications. i believe i’ve seen a few durham steam locomotives with open windows, but never a shorty like that, that doesn't mean they didn’t exist though. unfortunately they aren’t well documented.  

colorado hirailer posted:

Okay...never before heard of Durham, and have worn out shoes hiking through train shows...more info, please, on THIS site, not avoidable ones.

they are cheapish clockwork and battery powered train sets made from the 70s until modern day, the molds have changed hands a lot but you still see new ones from time to time, usually very cheap store brand stuff. in my opinion the older ones tend to be better made.

colorado hirailer posted:

Okay...never before heard of Durham, and have worn out shoes hiking through train shows...more info, please, on THIS site, not avoidable ones.

Here is a page on Durham trains for collectors - I believe the owner is working on updating it, so it might pay to check it from time to time.

Before I go on - very nice conversion Signal Woman!  Glad to see a Durham project here!

Durham makes/made cheaper windup and battery powered O gauge train sets.  The windup motor is a very close copy of a Marx Riser Gear motor, and works very well... except the plastic handle on the key tends to break.  Throughout the years, the Durham trains have continued to be produced under other brand names, such as EZ TEC and Scientific Toys.  I haven't seen any of the windups available (new) for a long time, but some battery sets are still being made.  I just bought a new battery set a couple of months ago:

Forty_Niner_Set

It's the "Forty-Niner" set sold under the EZ TEC brand.  But, my favorites are the older windups, especially the U-Boat style diesels:

DurhamDiesels1

The Durham windups have covers under the motors that tend to catch on switches, and make running on 3-rail track impossible.  I've modified a couple of the diesels by removing the bottom cover, and installing die-cast wheels salvaged from a small Lionel diesel switcher.  This makes them nice runners that glide over the switches instead of catching, wobbling, or even derailing on them.

By the way, if the plastic handle on the key breaks off, just use a 3.25mm clock key on the square winding stem:

UP_Rebuild-6

Some more Durham pictures:

ChessieBattery2DurhamLocoTenderSantaFeDiesel4

UPset4

 - James

 

"Clockwork guys really know how to unwind!"

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NHVRYGray posted:

Well one mystery solved, and as usual more questions.

I have had this engine for years, and have no idea where it came from.  Obviously a Marx motor, but everything inside looks factory with no obvious modifications.  I looked at a Durham Trains page and nothing like it. Anyone got any ideas?

As to th OP, looks great.  If I saw it on a table at a show, it would be going home with me.20200227_17325020200227_17331220200227_17332520200227_173351mi

OK, here is my guess - It's a Durham battery operated locomotive shell (some were made with open windows) and someone has skillfully shortened the boiler.  Look closely at the point where the boiler meets the cab, or just in front of the cab, and see if there is a seam.  The body is identical to Durham steamers I have except there is a section missing between the cab and 2nd sand dome.

 - James

 

"Clockwork guys really know how to unwind!"

Shiiiit, this thread brings back memories. I used it have a set of red passenger cars and a broken tender  I found at a garage sale as a child I never figured out what brand they were. Don’t have photos but I’m pretty sure they’re a durham/ez tec/whatever they were. 

The Local O Gauge Nut, confined to the attic of the insane asylum known as the family home.

the pilot kept jumping over curves so i redesigned it to be sprung, but now, we have a runner!

00BE1062-6B25-4BB5-A57D-2F95B8D17642

update - and now we have a headlight.

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another update - lots of holes to drill today, wish me luck.

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Last edited by Signalwoman
Signalwoman posted:

well, i’m no machinist, but i think these should do.

 FDE1E9ED-0F45-4F1A-B71F-99FAB3F09148

of course, i had to tap the wheels too.

B3B86163-14B4-4531-85FD-CA79B7CE3979

9E275BBF-C33F-4736-A1F2-E86352BF7783

A suggestion.  When drilling into material that thin there are drill bits referred to as sheet metal bits or brad point bits.  I have a set of English and metric bits just for that purpose.

The woodworkers stores carry them.  Look for stores under the names Woodcraft or Rockler.

Lou N

Lou N posted:
A suggestion.  When drilling into material that thin there are drill bits referred to as sheet metal bits or brad point bits.  I have a set of English and metric bits just for that purpose.

The woodworkers stores carry them.  Look for stores under the names Woodcraft or Rockler.

Lou N

good advice, i use to have some, but i kept blunting the ends, for these i drilled a small pilot then ran a step bit through it to enlarge the holes and remove the burrs. the slots were done by drilling 2 holes and opening the space between with a dremel. 

it’s really satisfying to see in motion, but of course, it would be, considering the time put in.

07C7B4AF-F87B-4160-A215-A7E569D737C3

i still need to come up with some rods to run to the cylinders, but it’s becoming quite a looker.

1FD0F37A-49E5-4C53-B887-171289583FA0

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Last edited by Signalwoman
Signalwoman posted:
Lou N posted:
A suggestion.  When drilling into material that thin there are drill bits referred to as sheet metal bits or brad point bits.  I have a set of English and metric bits just for that purpose.

The woodworkers stores carry them.  Look for stores under the names Woodcraft or Rockler.

Lou N

good advice, i use to have some, but i kept blunting the ends, for these i drilled a small pilot then ran a step bit through it to enlarge the holes and remove the burrs. the slots were done by drilling 2 holes and opening the space between with a dremel. 

it’s really satisfying to see in motion, but of course, it would be, considering the time put in.

07C7B4AF-F87B-4160-A215-A7E569D737C3

i still need to come up with some rods to run to the cylinders, but it’s becoming quite a looker.

1FD0F37A-49E5-4C53-B887-171289583FA0

Very well done.  Very well drilled!

When I was an R&D Engineer I would head out to our tool room and ask one of the machinists to make me a particular size sheet metal bit.  They could shape the brad point perfectly on a diamond wheel and as much as I watched I was never able to grasp the technique.  

Lou N

Lou N posted:
Very well done.  Very well drilled!

When I was an R&D Engineer I would head out to our tool room and ask one of the machinists to make me a particular size sheet metal bit.  They could shape the brad point perfectly on a diamond wheel and as much as I watched I was never able to grasp the technique.  

Lou N

thank you! if i had a drill press this would be easy work. unfortunately i’ve just got a cordless drill, and steady hands. i couldn’t imagine what goes into making drill bits, but i do have a knack for burning them up lol.

im working on the cylinder rods now, brass tube over steel wire, they’re coming along, but it’s been a lot of trial and error.

 6157E89E-3663-4BDC-B3DC-130E1994C4FE

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