Not sure if I will be clear in describing this but I need help. I have a train layout that is composed of modular sections. I want to run bus wiring underneath but between each modular section I’ll need to connect the bus wiring from one modular to another. I’ll need to be able to disconnect the modular sections easily but am unsure how to do it. Does anyone have any ideas? 

Original Post

 

Powerpoles are pretty great for inter connected modules. They require a crimper but you can put any number of them together to make a multi connector of wires. They are also not male or female, they all plug together so no mistakes. I would get the 30A size. The plastic bodies are the same for these lower currents, only the metal connector inside is sized to fit different gauge wire. And different gauge sizes will also plug together. There are about a half dozen colors or more 

There are many sellers, so look around, here’s one 

Shttp://www.westmountainradio.com/product_info.php?products_id=pp_lock_12

 

Chuck TCA LCCA ARRL BMWMOA

Euro style terminal blocks, available at Lowe's will do the job.  Available in either a 10 or 12 block arrangement.  You can cut them to desired number of positions easily.  They will screw directly to the underside of your sections.  Install on one end of each section.  Leave enough wire sticking out on the other end to facilitate connection.

bruce

cjack posted:

 

Powerpoles are pretty great for inter connected modules. They require a crimper but you can put any number of them together to make a multi connector of wires. They are also not male or female, they all plug together so no mistakes. I would get the 30A size. The plastic bodies are the same for these lower currents, only the metal connector inside is sized to fit different gauge wire. And different gauge sizes will also plug together. There are about a half dozen colors or more 

There are many sellers, so look around, here’s one 

Shttp://www.westmountainradio.com/product_info.php?products_id=pp_lock_12

 

Agreed, Anderson Powerpoles are what N-TRAK currently recommends for module buss connections.  You can get them at many places, including Powerwerx.com (where I have ordered from before).  Extremely easy connect and disconnect.  You can gang the individual plastic housings together to make one big plug, as opposed to having a bunch of separate little plugs.

Only one exception to what cjack posted, you do NOT necessarily need a crimper, you can merely solder the metal connectors to the ends of the wires before plugging them into the plastic housings.  If you do this, then the metal connectors are basically reusable, whereas they wouldn't be if crimped.  Their crimping tool is kind of expensive.  Harbor Freight Tools used to carry a crimping tool that worked, also.  I bought one a long time ago, but never really used it after I found out that soldering worked.  At the time, seems like I only paid $5 or $6 or so for it.  Don't know if they still carry this tool or not.  I'm sure the price has gone up if they do.

Hope this helps. 

Paul  

Ship Rock Island ROCKET FREIGHT

 

2 Rails?  3 Rails?  Doesn't matter, I can't count that high in either case.

I love the smell of fresh-brewed creosote first thing in the morning.

If the government knew how much fun O-gauge railroading was, they'd outlaw it!

Common sense is my second best trait.  Nonsense is my first, of course. 

Probably just fine but I avoid soldering connectors on wire ends because the solder wicks back on the wire which makes it prone to break with movement. That’s partly why automakers do not solder.

Chuck TCA LCCA ARRL BMWMOA

cjack posted:

Probably just fine but I avoid soldering connectors on wire ends because the solder wicks back on the wire which makes it prone to break with movement. That’s partly why automakers do not solder.

Well, sorry cjack, but I don't think wicking back into the wiring is that big of a problem.  When one knows how to make a good solder joint, very little wicking is involved.  I converted all of my N-Trak club's modules over to Powerpoles over a decade ago, and soldered all of the metal connectors to the wiring.  These modules take a beating year after year, with set-ups and tear-downs and transportation and storage.  They've never suffered a broken wire yet.

Soldering is the best and most positive way to make solid and reliable electrical connections.  It also takes the LONGEST amount of time to accomplish.  The longest amount of time?  That's not just partly the reason, you can probably bet your bottom dollar that's the ONLY reason automakers do not solder. 

Paul  

Ship Rock Island ROCKET FREIGHT

 

2 Rails?  3 Rails?  Doesn't matter, I can't count that high in either case.

I love the smell of fresh-brewed creosote first thing in the morning.

If the government knew how much fun O-gauge railroading was, they'd outlaw it!

Common sense is my second best trait.  Nonsense is my first, of course. 

I don’t wish to belabor it but a crimp is a better connection than solder as well as generally more reliable when done correctly. Solder is roughly 10 times more resistive than a crimp. That all probably helps the car guys make up their minds too.

I once had a scientist tell me to have his 100 amp crimp soldered too and I went through the dialogue on crimps and solder. He remarked that solder was better than air though, so fill it up.😁

I know you’re fine with the job and it’s fine. Just sayin’.

Chuck TCA LCCA ARRL BMWMOA

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