Track saws

No not for cutting track for ripping sheets of plywood. I am thinking about getting one. I tried the Kreg jig, worked well for the first few pieces I cut then it started getting off. I checked it, it was out of square so I returned it. I am looking at the Menard's Master force 6-1/2" track saw. Anybody use one? It is in my price range plus you can hook a shop vac to it to collect dust. Thanks in advance for all reply's.

One thing about trains, it doesn't matter where they are going, it's having the sense to get on.

Original Post
Popi posted:

youtube it

Did that but there is only one review showing the unboxing of the saw. not how good it works. I have searched and searched but no luck.

One thing about trains, it doesn't matter where they are going, it's having the sense to get on.

FEET

1 - do you know someone with a table saw?

2 - track saws are a lot of money. If you are using it 'one time' try looking at a normal circular saw (with the proper blade) and a metal straight edge cutting guide with a variable clamp mechanism you can clamp to the work piece.
Joe

Contractor Straight Edge Clamp Tool Guide Line Table Saw Jaw Router Ruler Cut | eBay

If you are set on a track saw then Festool or DeWalt but you are looking at $600+.

Joe Fauty

feet posted:

No not for cutting track for ripping sheets of plywood. I am thinking about getting one. I tried the Kreg jig, worked well for the first few pieces I cut then it started getting off. I checked it, it was out of square so I returned it. I am looking at the Menard's Master force 6-1/2" track saw. Anybody use one? It is in my price range plus you can hook a shop vac to it to collect dust. Thanks in advance for all reply's.

Yes, I have it. For the price it can't be beat. Obviously it is not a Festool, but it does a great job. Only complaint is the dust collection is not great. It is a whole lot better than a circular saw but still leaves a trail and shoots some out the front. The four 2' guides are a bonus and if you set them up correctly you can cut an 8' sheet of plywood very straight. I highly recommend doing a "score" cut on the first pass then complete the cut. 98%+ no tear out or chipping and that's with the finer tooth blade that comes with it. I imagine if you bought one the expensive blades such as a Bosch the cut would be 100% perfect. I would recommend this saw to any "casual" woodworker.

A couple of tips, always use the clamps, don't rely on the non skid tape only, the bottom of the saw  might have some sharp edges that catch on the track, small file will take care of it, always run the saw down the track before cutting to make sure everything is "smooth", spray some silicone and wipe off excess on the bottom of the saw and the track.

Steve

Joe Fauty posted:

FEET

1 - do you know someone with a table saw?

2 - track saws are a lot of money. If you are using it 'one time' try looking at a normal circular saw (with the proper blade) and a metal straight edge cutting guide with a variable clamp mechanism you can clamp to the work piece.
Joe

Contractor Straight Edge Clamp Tool Guide Line Table Saw Jaw Router Ruler Cut | eBay

If you are set on a track saw then Festool or DeWalt but you are looking at $600+.

I've got a table saw but luging 3/4 plywood with my bad back is impossible plus it takes 2 people to get a straight cut. I could use a straight edge but I need something with a dust collection port. Dust gets all over the train room and is a mess to clean up.  I may wait until summer so I can cut it outside. I would use the track saw many times but they are expensive. Menard's has one for 200.00 but this maybe a you get what you pay for thing.

One thing about trains, it doesn't matter where they are going, it's having the sense to get on.

Rescued Trains posted:
feet posted:

No not for cutting track for ripping sheets of plywood. I am thinking about getting one. I tried the Kreg jig, worked well for the first few pieces I cut then it started getting off. I checked it, it was out of square so I returned it. I am looking at the Menard's Master force 6-1/2" track saw. Anybody use one? It is in my price range plus you can hook a shop vac to it to collect dust. Thanks in advance for all reply's.

Yes, I have it. For the price it can't be beat. Obviously it is not a Festool, but it does a great job. Only complaint is the dust collection is not great. It is a whole lot better than a circular saw but still leaves a trail and shoots some out the front. The four 2' guides are a bonus and if you set them up correctly you can cut an 8' sheet of plywood very straight. I highly recommend doing a "score" cut on the first pass then complete the cut. 98%+ no tear out or chipping and that's with the finer tooth blade that comes with it. I imagine if you bought one the expensive blades such as a Bosch the cut would be 100% perfect. I would recommend this saw to any "casual" woodworker.

A couple of tips, always use the clamps, don't rely on the non skid tape only, the bottom of the saw  might have some sharp edges that catch on the track, small file will take care of it, always run the saw down the track before cutting to make sure everything is "smooth", spray some silicone and wipe off excess on the bottom of the saw and the track.

Steve

Thanks, that's what I needed to know. I will stop by Menard's tomorrow and check them out. If I buy it I will get a good blade. 

One thing about trains, it doesn't matter where they are going, it's having the sense to get on.

8 Foot straight edge with clamp and a circular saw.  You're going to need a square also.  With a couple of 2 x 4's you can cut the plywood on the floor by yourself.  Probably going to need a couple of clamps when you start to make cuts that are not right angles.

Steve

I have some perfectly straight 1 x 4's that I use for straight edges.  One each at 4' long, 6' long, and 8' long.  I secure them to the work with a C-clamp on each end, then further screw them down tight with deck screws at 1' on center, so they can't move.  Then slide my Skill Saw down the straight edge to do the cutting.  Yeah, it leaves a screw hole every one foot, but in most cases it doesn't matter for my purposes.  I do this outside of course, just because I don't want to make a saw dust mess in the house.

The Menard's Master Force Track Saw looks pretty cool, however, even if limited to the nominal 4' of track.  For the price, I may have to go check it out.  I'd best wait until all the train stuff is put away for the season, so that the saw doesn't end up costing me a whole bunch more money should I decide to get one. 

Paul  

Ship Rock Island ROCKET FREIGHT

 

2 Rails?  3 Rails?  Doesn't matter, I can't count that high anyway.

I love the smell of fresh-brewed creosote first thing in the morning.

Do yourself a favor and forget the ready-made saw guides or track saws, as you call them.  Take a piece of 1/4" luan plywood and rip it to maybe 8" in width.  Make another rip about 4" wide.  Now glue the smaller rip on top of the larger one.  When the glue had set, take your circular saw and run the plate along the lip created by the smaller piece of ply on the larger piece.  It will cut the larger (bottom) piece exactly the right distance from the lip.  

Now when you want to rip or crosscut a sheet of plywood, simply set the edge of your new saw guide on the pencil line you made when you marked you plywood for cutting.  The saw will make a perfectly straight cut.

You can make one saw guide 8'-0" long and another 4'-0" long.  You will be surprised how long they will last.  

This method works with sidewinders and worm drive saws.  

Dan Padova

 

"In the course of my life I have had to eat my words, and I must confess it was a wholesome diet"..........Winston Churchill

                                                                                                                                        

Dan Padova posted:

Do yourself a favor and forget the ready-made saw guides or track saws, as you call them.  Take a piece of 1/4" luan plywood and rip it to maybe 8" in width.  Make another rip about 4" wide.  Now glue the smaller rip on top of the larger one.  When the glue had set, take your circular saw and run the plate along the lip created by the smaller piece of ply on the larger piece.  It will cut the larger (bottom) piece exactly the right distance from the lip.  

Now when you want to rip or crosscut a sheet of plywood, simply set the edge of your new saw guide on the pencil line you made when you marked you plywood for cutting.  The saw will make a perfectly straight cut.

You can make one saw guide 8'-0" long and another 4'-0" long.  You will be surprised how long they will last.  

This method works with sidewinders and worm drive saws.  

Sounds like a good idea to me.

One thing about trains, it doesn't matter where they are going, it's having the sense to get on.

There is no one correct answer. Like most questions of this type, it depends on what purpose you are breaking down a sheet of plywood for. If you are getting into serious woodworking, such as cabinet or furniture making, no homemade jig or even one of the cheaper track saws will give you the results you will be happy with. For that you should be looking at the Festool (if money is no option) with the Makita and DeWalt vying for second place ( at the time I last researched the tool). I was trying to decide between those three when a close friend bought the Festool, which he gladly lets me borrow when needed. It makes clamping wooden straightedges like I used to to seem like using flint tools. 

But if you are mainly looking to accomplish tasks such as cutting sheet goods for layouts or other instances when precision or appearance are not as critical then one of the options above will suffice. Some guys do just love building jigs and get carried away with them when reasonably priced commercial alternatives exist. I built my own crosscutting sled for my tablesaw that works great for smaller plywood pieces. It's really just your choice. 

In the end, you'd be nuts to listen to guys you don't know (including me!) when considering spending good money on a tool. There are countless woodworking forums online where the specific tools are discussed and a consensus can sometimes be seen, as well as review sites and YouTube videos where you can see these things in action.

Joe Fauty posted:

FEET

1 - do you know someone with a table saw?

2 - track saws are a lot of money. If you are using it 'one time' try looking at a normal circular saw (with the proper blade) and a metal straight edge cutting guide with a variable clamp mechanism you can clamp to the work piece.
Joe

Contractor Straight Edge Clamp Tool Guide Line Table Saw Jaw Router Ruler Cut | eBay

If you are set on a track saw then Festool or DeWalt but you are looking at $600+.

Bought one of those adjustable metal cutting guides like above at Harbor Freight for peanuts. With the correct blade it works like a charm whether I use a circular or jig saw. 

Mike

 

GO to home depot and buy  a sheet of plywood and have them cut it to the sizes you want , they have a saw all set up for this , take the wood to the checkout with the price tag . i think it is .50 cents a cut for more than 2 cuts .tech man

German posted:

There is no one correct answer. Like most questions of this type, it depends on what purpose you are breaking down a sheet of plywood for. If you are getting into serious woodworking, such as cabinet or furniture making, no homemade jig or even one of the cheaper track saws will give you the results you will be happy with. For that you should be looking at the Festool (if money is no option) with the Makita and DeWalt vying for second place ( at the time I last researched the tool). I was trying to decide between those three when a close friend bought the Festool, which he gladly lets me borrow when needed. It makes clamping wooden straightedges like I used to to seem like using flint tools. 

But if you are mainly looking to accomplish tasks such as cutting sheet goods for layouts or other instances when precision or appearance are not as critical then one of the options above will suffice. Some guys do just love building jigs and get carried away with them when reasonably priced commercial alternatives exist. I built my own crosscutting sled for my tablesaw that works great for smaller plywood pieces. It's really just your choice. 

In the end, you'd be nuts to listen to guys you don't know (including me!) when considering spending good money on a tool. There are countless woodworking forums online where the specific tools are discussed and a consensus can sometimes be seen, as well as review sites and YouTube videos where you can see these things in action.

I'm just going to use the track saw  for layout building may make some drawers for a work bench I built. Looks like I need to do some more research.

One thing about trains, it doesn't matter where they are going, it's having the sense to get on.

ezmike posted:
Joe Fauty posted:

FEET

1 - do you know someone with a table saw?

2 - track saws are a lot of money. If you are using it 'one time' try looking at a normal circular saw (with the proper blade) and a metal straight edge cutting guide with a variable clamp mechanism you can clamp to the work piece.
Joe

Contractor Straight Edge Clamp Tool Guide Line Table Saw Jaw Router Ruler Cut | eBay

If you are set on a track saw then Festool or DeWalt but you are looking at $600+.

Bought one of those adjustable metal cutting guides like above at Harbor Freight for peanuts. With the correct blade it works like a charm whether I use a circular or jig saw. 

Mike

 

That would be a good option if they made those 8' long. But i'd still have to do it outside. I don't want all that dust all over the train building.

One thing about trains, it doesn't matter where they are going, it's having the sense to get on.

For what you describe, I wouldn't bother with a track saw. Most layouts have some sort of edging covering the plywood edges. My pine edging has a grove on the inside cut on my router table that the plywood and homosote slide into. I could have cut the plywood with a chainsaw and you'd never see the results. For the workbench drawers you describe, you just need to break the large sheet into quarters with a circular saw, or have the store do it for you on their panel saw as Techman said. You can then use the factory edge against your tablesaw fence to accurately cut the pieces to needed size. I assume you have a tablesaw already if you are planning on building a workbench with drawers. If not, you should be looking at one of those , rather than a track saw. You will find much more future use for it, even if it's a small contractor or portable model. 

Partial solutin for saw dust:  I was working in my 23x40 room.  AS thngs progressed, I hung large sheets of plastic from the suspended ceiling group down on to the floor in one part of the room to make an enclosed cutting area.  It greatly reduced the saw dust going everywhere and saved 1000 trips up to the garage.

techman posted:

GO to home depot and buy  a sheet of plywood and have them cut it to the sizes you want , they have a saw all set up for this , take the wood to the checkout with the price tag . i think it is .50 cents a cut for more than 2 cuts .tech man

Several friends in the past have had plywood cut to sizes they want at their go-to home building centers.  Not a single one of them has ever been 100% happy with the cut pieces they got - the stores can never seem to get wood cut to the exact dimensions.

I prefer to cut my own wood.  I can almost always get the exact dimensions I want.  And I have a built-in fireplace in the living room for the rare occasion when I miss the mark.  

Paul  

Ship Rock Island ROCKET FREIGHT

 

2 Rails?  3 Rails?  Doesn't matter, I can't count that high anyway.

I love the smell of fresh-brewed creosote first thing in the morning.

If you want to cut tight circles in plywood you can buy cupped blades to accommodate the size of the circle.  You can even mount a pin on a table saw to cut a disk.  I use a circular saw with a regular blade for cutting subroadbed curves

Eternity is a long time to have been wrong.

Dan Padova posted:

Do yourself a favor and forget the ready-made saw guides or track saws, as you call them.  Take a piece of 1/4" luan plywood and rip it to maybe 8" in width.  Make another rip about 4" wide.  Now glue the smaller rip on top of the larger one.  When the glue had set, take your circular saw and run the plate along the lip created by the smaller piece of ply on the larger piece.  It will cut the larger (bottom) piece exactly the right distance from the lip.  

Now when you want to rip or crosscut a sheet of plywood, simply set the edge of your new saw guide on the pencil line you made when you marked you plywood for cutting.  The saw will make a perfectly straight cut.

You can make one saw guide 8'-0" long and another 4'-0" long.  You will be surprised how long they will last.  

This method works with sidewinders and worm drive saws.  

Dan I've been using those for years.  It doesn't get any simpler or more accurate than that.   Old school is  great.  

2thumbsup

Wild Mary (AKA Nick) Retired & "Riding The Wild Mary"

 

 

Forum Member Since 24 Sept. 2004

 

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As others have said, there are a) several ways to do this, but b) the best choices will depend upon whether this is a single (or few) shot exercise or whether you envision other DIY projects where perhaps greater accuracy is needed.  You can certainly make your own straight-edge jig or use the kind of straight-edge clamp mentioned above by Joe Fauty.  I use something similar from Rockler which is a two-piece straight-edge with a track.  There is a mating piece that fits into the track and that fastens to the circular saw (I also have one attached to a router base).  Each of the straight-edge pieces are about 4.5 ft long, so for cutting across a 4x8 sheet of plywood, you only need to use one.  The two pieces butt together end-to-end to give a 9 ft. straight-edge for ripping the plywood in the long dimension.  An obvious advantage of having the straight edge in two pieces is its easier to store two shorter pieces and a 9 ft. piece can be pretty unwieldy in tight spaces.

Rockler (with whom I have no connection other than as a customer) also makes a dust hose system that attaches to the sawdust discharge spout on most circular saws and plugs into a shopvac.  It does a pretty good job of keeping the sawdust under control.  I've found that using a 2 inch thick sheet of  4x8 rigid foam on the floor as a cutting surface works well - at least for making the initial cuts. 

- Rich

Lots of wood working tips to learn from one another here, thanks all.

Having been raised by depression era parents I have been taught to never waste wood.  In that endeavor one of the areas that model RRers can capture waste is to use curved plywood scraps left over from subroadbed cuttings.  Additionally after making an installation of cantilevered platform supports:

South alcove wider

…..there will be  18" X 36"  foot ball shaped hunks of 3/4"  stacked in the shop.

All one really needs to do is establish one straight edge.  Once done, then subsequent table saw cuts and chop saw trimmings can provide you with a supply of  short cross members:

IMG_8026

upright supports:

IMG_7570Note: Portland feather finish.

Miter glue blocks:

IMG_7814.

Because clamping to curved edges can be a bit hairy I simply take a piece of wood with a known straight edge then using a brad nailer, attach it to the curved wood so as to position the scrap for cutting along the fence.  All I need is one straight edge then I slice it up to 3 1/2" strips for use where ever; cross members, supports, guessets, whatevers.

Also, for clamping guides, in addition to my 4', 6' & 8' level I use screed bars.  Screed bars are available where ever contractors concrete supplies are sold.  Typically they are rectangular tubing sold individually or in 2',4',6',8' sets.  Screed bars are used to level off a fresh concrete pour by josseling them along side rails in prep for finishing concrete.

Side rails:IMG_8520

We used gauge bars to stake the curved bench work side rails in place then slide a screed bar along the top edge.

Locally screed bars are available at Hollingworth supply in Elsmere, DE.

Eternity is a long time to have been wrong.

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richs09 posted:

As others have said, there are a) several ways to do this, but b) the best choices will depend upon whether this is a single (or few) shot exercise or whether you envision other DIY projects where perhaps greater accuracy is needed.  You can certainly make your own straight-edge jig or use the kind of straight-edge clamp mentioned above by Joe Fauty.  I use something similar from Rockler which is a two-piece straight-edge with a track.  There is a mating piece that fits into the track and that fastens to the circular saw (I also have one attached to a router base).  Each of the straight-edge pieces are about 4.5 ft long, so for cutting across a 4x8 sheet of plywood, you only need to use one.  The two pieces butt together end-to-end to give a 9 ft. straight-edge for ripping the plywood in the long dimension.  An obvious advantage of having the straight edge in two pieces is its easier to store two shorter pieces and a 9 ft. piece can be pretty unwieldy in tight spaces.

Rockler (with whom I have no connection other than as a customer) also makes a dust hose system that attaches to the sawdust discharge spout on most circular saws and plugs into a shopvac.  It does a pretty good job of keeping the sawdust under control.  I've found that using a 2 inch thick sheet of  4x8 rigid foam on the floor as a cutting surface works well - at least for making the initial cuts. 

- Rich

Rich, do you know what brand of circular saw has a dust port? Mine doesn't and I have not been able to find one that does.

One thing about trains, it doesn't matter where they are going, it's having the sense to get on.

My knowledge is limited to the saws that I have - my main circular saw is an old(ish) Black and Decker "Quantum" that has a dust port as part of the blade guard (the port is adjustable so you can direct the sawdust discharge when its not hooked up to the shop vac).  I also have a small  (meaning 5" or so blade) ryobi cordless that does not have a discharge port.  I just happened to have the Rockler website open and took a quick look there and it does look like a mixed bag - the Triton saw they sell has a port as do one of the Makita and Dewalt saws -- but other models don't.  Further searching on Lowe's or HD or amazon might reveal some other options.

B & D doesn't have the 'rugged' reputation of Milwaukee or DeWalt but mine has certainly generated its share of sawdust over the years and aside from replacing the carbide tipped blade occasionally, I've never found a reason to want something else...

- Rich

feet posted:
Joe Fauty posted:

FEET

1 - do you know someone with a table saw?

2 - track saws are a lot of money. If you are using it 'one time' try looking at a normal circular saw (with the proper blade) and a metal straight edge cutting guide with a variable clamp mechanism you can clamp to the work piece.
Joe

Contractor Straight Edge Clamp Tool Guide Line Table Saw Jaw Router Ruler Cut | eBay

If you are set on a track saw then Festool or DeWalt but you are looking at $600+.

I've got a table saw but luging 3/4 plywood with my bad back is impossible plus it takes 2 people to get a straight cut. I could use a straight edge but I need something with a dust collection port. Dust gets all over the train room and is a mess to clean up.  I may wait until summer so I can cut it outside. I would use the track saw many times but they are expensive. Menard's has one for 200.00 but this maybe a you get what you pay for thing.

Yea I know what you mean. I do like some one else posted. When I bought plywood I had the store cut it to the dimensions I need but a little over sized. I took the pieces home and ran them through my table saw with the right blade to clean up the edges. My minimum for handling by myself was 4 x 4 feet. It pays to have a good outfeed table.

You also may want to consider Baltic birch plywood. It is sold in 5 x 5 sheets. I use this stuff exclusively for shop cabinets, tables, roll around carts etc. I have to special order from Home Depot but they will accommodate.

Joe

Joe Fauty

Rescued Trains posted:
feet posted:

No not for cutting track for ripping sheets of plywood. I am thinking about getting one. I tried the Kreg jig, worked well for the first few pieces I cut then it started getting off. I checked it, it was out of square so I returned it. I am looking at the Menard's Master force 6-1/2" track saw. Anybody use one? It is in my price range plus you can hook a shop vac to it to collect dust. Thanks in advance for all reply's.

Yes, I have it. For the price it can't be beat. Obviously it is not a Festool, but it does a great job. Only complaint is the dust collection is not great. It is a whole lot better than a circular saw but still leaves a trail and shoots some out the front. The four 2' guides are a bonus and if you set them up correctly you can cut an 8' sheet of plywood very straight. I highly recommend doing a "score" cut on the first pass then complete the cut. 98%+ no tear out or chipping and that's with the finer tooth blade that comes with it. I imagine if you bought one the expensive blades such as a Bosch the cut would be 100% perfect. I would recommend this saw to any "casual" woodworker.

A couple of tips, always use the clamps, don't rely on the non skid tape only, the bottom of the saw  might have some sharp edges that catch on the track, small file will take care of it, always run the saw down the track before cutting to make sure everything is "smooth", spray some silicone and wipe off excess on the bottom of the saw and the track.

Steve

Even a Festool will shoot out chips. Instead of silicone you could also use a small soap bar for the track slide.

richs09 posted:

My knowledge is limited to the saws that I have - my main circular saw is an old(ish) Black and Decker "Quantum" that has a dust port as part of the blade guard (the port is adjustable so you can direct the sawdust discharge when its not hooked up to the shop vac).  I also have a small  (meaning 5" or so blade) ryobi cordless that does not have a discharge port.  I just happened to have the Rockler website open and took a quick look there and it does look like a mixed bag - the Triton saw they sell has a port as do one of the Makita and Dewalt saws -- but other models don't.  Further searching on Lowe's or HD or amazon might reveal some other options.

B & D doesn't have the 'rugged' reputation of Milwaukee or DeWalt but mine has certainly generated its share of sawdust over the years and aside from replacing the carbide tipped blade occasionally, I've never found a reason to want something else...

- Rich

Rich back in the day Black & Decker was a great saw. I had one but wore it out after 20 years of use.

One thing about trains, it doesn't matter where they are going, it's having the sense to get on.

balidas posted:
Rescued Trains posted:
feet posted:

No not for cutting track for ripping sheets of plywood. I am thinking about getting one. I tried the Kreg jig, worked well for the first few pieces I cut then it started getting off. I checked it, it was out of square so I returned it. I am looking at the Menard's Master force 6-1/2" track saw. Anybody use one? It is in my price range plus you can hook a shop vac to it to collect dust. Thanks in advance for all reply's.

Yes, I have it. For the price it can't be beat. Obviously it is not a Festool, but it does a great job. Only complaint is the dust collection is not great. It is a whole lot better than a circular saw but still leaves a trail and shoots some out the front. The four 2' guides are a bonus and if you set them up correctly you can cut an 8' sheet of plywood very straight. I highly recommend doing a "score" cut on the first pass then complete the cut. 98%+ no tear out or chipping and that's with the finer tooth blade that comes with it. I imagine if you bought one the expensive blades such as a Bosch the cut would be 100% perfect. I would recommend this saw to any "casual" woodworker.

A couple of tips, always use the clamps, don't rely on the non skid tape only, the bottom of the saw  might have some sharp edges that catch on the track, small file will take care of it, always run the saw down the track before cutting to make sure everything is "smooth", spray some silicone and wipe off excess on the bottom of the saw and the track.

Steve

Even a Festool will shoot out chips. Instead of silicone you could also use a small soap bar for the track slide.

I use Johnson's paste wax on my table saw and planer. Prevents rust and makes the surfaces slick as glass. Plus if you want to paint your wood you can. Silicone and paint don't go together.

One thing about trains, it doesn't matter where they are going, it's having the sense to get on.

feet posted:

No not for cutting track for ripping sheets of plywood. I am thinking about getting one. I tried the Kreg jig, worked well for the first few pieces I cut then it started getting off. I checked it, it was out of square so I returned it. I am looking at the Menard's Master force 6-1/2" track saw. Anybody use one? It is in my price range plus you can hook a shop vac to it to collect dust. Thanks in advance for all reply's.

I see you are getting many good suggestions. I  bought bcx grade plywood at Home Depot and had them cut it into a manageable length (65"). They cannot guarantee accuracy and told me +- 1/2" is about as good as they can do, also, squareness can be an issue. The track saw lets you trim quickly  accurately without a helper or outfeed tables. Also the track saw is quite useable as a circular saw, even though it has a slightly smaller blade (61/2"). Plus the 4, 27" sections can be use as a universal toolguide, straight edge.

Steve

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