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thinking about buying a turntable for my layout which I use mostly big boy engines cab forward challengers  and eventually Nigeria Lionel the new one when they are finally released. don't want any issues when I starting using a turntable and would like one that works perfectly and approximately how much do they cost!  ? thanks for any answers and support!

Alan

Last edited by Alan Mancus
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I have the Millhouse River 34 inch and you will not finder a better product. It’s all welded aluminum frame with metal bridges make it practically bullet proof and the indexer is fantastic. The only thing better than the turntable is Al’s customer support. He’s been always willing to help me out on with any question or problems I’ve had

Matt Makens posted:

I have the Millhouse River 34 inch and you will not finder a better product. It’s all welded aluminum frame with metal bridges make it practically bullet proof and the indexer is fantastic. The only thing better than the turntable is Al’s customer support. He’s been always willing to help me out on with any question or problems I’ve had

I also have the Millhouse River 34”   AND  agree with everything that Matt stated.

Al is fantastic to deal with!!

Last edited by W&W

Just curious, as I built my own 33" (I'll ever do that again!), but I have considered replacing it with one of the manufactured ones, and I notice above that the Millhouse seems to be the crowd favorite, so I am wondering if any of you have any specific objections to or problems with the Ross version. Ross offers quality products, as many or most of us know, and I'm curious about the apparent large preference for Millhouse.

Both appear to be well-made, and I'm not looking to slam anyone, of course. Neither is inexpensive.

D500 posted:

Just curious, as I built my own 33" (I'll ever do that again!), but I have considered replacing it with one of the manufactured ones, and I notice above that the Millhouse seems to be the crowd favorite, so I am wondering if any of you have any specific objections to or problems with the Ross version. Ross offers quality products, as many or most of us know, and I'm curious about the apparent large preference for Millhouse.

Both appear to be well-made, and I'm not looking to slam anyone, of course. Neither is inexpensive.

Ditto.

Here’s my 2 cents as to why, all aluminum construction, weathering option, more detailed bridge as well as diferent bridge options.  The construction is such that you only need to make a round hole, and use the adjustable tabs for mounting.  This is a more compact option than the Ross.

the Ross wood construction is bigger, deeper that the Millhouse.  Ross makes many nice things, and at one point it was a top option, but since millhouse came out, I believe it surpassed the Ross.

Millhouse, hands down. The folks at Ross and Millhouse are both great to work with. I have a 34" Millhouse. The programmable indexing system is awesome and the turntable is far more robust built. It's built like a Sherman tank compared to the rest. It's the single most expensive item on my layout and you get what you pay for.

D500 posted:

Just curious, as I built my own 33" (I'll ever do that again!), but I have considered replacing it with one of the manufactured ones, and I notice above that the Millhouse seems to be the crowd favorite, so I am wondering if any of you have any specific objections to or problems with the Ross version. Ross offers quality products, as many or most of us know, and I'm curious about the apparent large preference for Millhouse.

Both appear to be well-made, and I'm not looking to slam anyone, of course. Neither is inexpensive.

I built my own too; 36" so I could fit the whole scale Allegheny and tender on it. I know it is not as good as Millhouse or Ross, but mine cost me under $100!!!

I used an antenna rotator for the motor and a lazy Susan bearing for stability. I made my own railings and used balsa wood for the skirts and pit walls. The control house is Plastruct. It worked out very well with some tinkering and careful measurement. I do not have an indexer, which makes operating it a little more challenging, but still fun. I could use a brake to lock the motor once positioned. The motor tends to retain some energy after power is cut, and it moves a bit too long. I haven't figured that part out yet but haven't tried too hard.

Enjoy your purchase! The Millhouse unit sounds great.

George

I too was in deep thought for a VERY long time about turntables. My wife did NOT like the price of the 33" Millhouse and tried very hard to convince me at every show or visit to a layout that Millhouse was over kill. WRONG! I finally bit the bullet and went with Millhouse and can not even imagine why I was looking elsewhere. Even she agrees after seeing it and helping me install it. I went full blown and got weathering and all the options. Al's support is worth the money alone. What a fantastic guy. He will do everything to make sure you have no problems. I ask him so many DUMB questions that I felt like Dopey from Disney Dwarfs. This turntable is absolutely the best manufactured piece of art work that works exactly like it is suppose to with NO PROBLEMS! I use atlas track and as my table was already built I had a problem with the plywood being 3/8 and a 1" foam on top. After many discussions with Al I purchased and installed with no problems. The answer was installing (simply cutting a hole from the traced line around the upside down turntable), installing and then framing a square around  the turntable for support of the plywood so it would not sag. I can only say It works, It's easy to install, it;s built to a very rugged standard, and man is it FUN!

 

I also have the MH River TT. I added the Indexer later on. I have been very happy with it and like others said above Al's customer service was great as I did have some installation questions. I believe that Ross also makes a great product. I picked the MH River TT because I liked the aluminum construction and Al offers the option of 2 rail track.

Since I didn't have one and wanted to be cool, LOL, I just got off the phone with Al and ordered me a 34" Turn Table.  Seriously I have been telling Al for years I'd be buying one and I finally can put the funds in place as well as some space to procure IMO the best turntable there is.  After spending last York in his booth demoing LCS operations it was a no brainer.

George S -

"I built my own too; 36" so I could fit the whole scale Allegheny and tender on it. I know it is not as good as Millhouse or Ross, but mine cost me under $100!!!

I used an antenna rotator for the motor and a lazy Susan bearing for stability. I made my own railings and used balsa wood for the skirts and pit walls. The control house is Plastruct. It worked out very well with some tinkering and careful measurement. I do not have an indexer, which makes operating it a little more challenging, but still fun. I could use a brake to lock the motor once positioned. The motor tends to retain some energy after power is cut, and it moves a bit too long. I haven't figured that part out yet but haven't tried too hard."

Yeah - I used a "turntable motor" (as in store window display) from one of the electronics remainders sellers; $35. Basswood; pine; plastic 50-cent Atlas HO bridge girders (I was going for a semi-ATSF/SP-look for some reason); styrene; dirt. The support track is Lionel outside 027 rails removed from the ties and spiked (small nails) down. Probably $100 spent.

It's 31" long as I recall - it has to handle the wheelbase of my Lionel AC-9 2-8-8-4.

Note the "natural weathering" on some of my equipment.

$100 and blood, sweat, profanity, regret and, believe me, I'll never do it again. It works; the indexing software/hardware is between my ears and through my eyes. The degree of precision required to build one of these surprised me; more even than I expected - which is why the expensive store-bought ones look like a bargain from the other side.

Maybe I'll just attempt to fine-tune it;  it's crude, but its mine.

DSCN3126a

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Last edited by D500

A material list for a turntable I built several years ago.

Turntable project slideshow.  Have fun with your project.  Click on the underlined phrase to link.

Parts list.

Parts List from Diamond Scale.  Diamond Scale is under new ownership since I bought my parts in May 2007.
MK-111 turntable drive kit (1)
DT-09  turntable dolly trucks, (1) pair (not available) Dolly trucks were fabricated.
CB-30  turntable control cab (1) may not be required if using the Bowser 7902 bridge detail kit. 
Bowser turntable parts and detail kits are no longer available.
AK-104 Turntable Arch Kit Angled  (1) (not available).
WG-9   Worm and Drive Gear (Boston Gear 1049G) 7/16" bore. (1)required.
WS-87  3/16" X 6" Worm gear shaft (1)required.
B-187  3/16" ID Bronze Bushings (2) required.
SC-187 3/16" ID Shaft Collar (2) required.
B-437  7/16" ID Bronze Bushings (2) required
SC-437 7/16" ID Shaft Collar (2) required.
US-1   3/16" X 1/8" universal drive.  (1)
 
Bowser Trains
#7902  O Gauge Bridge detail kit.
#79417 handrail post.  An Additional (20) were required. 
Bowser Turntables and detail part kits are no longer available.
 
Kaplar Lumber.
KP1186-OP24 Scale 10" X 12" .208" X .250" match up to Atlas railroad ties.
KP1126-OP24 Scale 2" X 10" .042" X .208"  addition deck material
 
Plastruct.
#90423 ABS Ladder
 
Evergreen Scale Models.
#146 .040" x .125" Styrene Strips.
#9077 .015" Clear Styrene sheet
#9040 .040" White Styrene sheet
 
K&S Engineering.
#91066   1/8" brass angle X .022" X 36"
#92098   3/16" brass bar X 12"
 
Crow River Products.
#O-56 Scale Electric Winch Kit. (2) required
 
Atlas.
#6056 40" flex track curved pit rail.
#6058 40" rigid track Bridge rails
#6094 Track Screws.
 
MSC Industrial Supply/ J&L Industrial Supply.
#607Z Bearing  7 X 19 X 6 mm bearing. (4) required.
 
Micro Fasteners.
RMB0212 2-56 X 3/4" brass round head screws.
 
Krylon paint.
#2323  River Rock spray paint
#1602 Ultra Flat Black spray paint
 
MinWax stain.
#224 Special Walnut. deck stain
 
Sherwin Williams primer/sealer.
#141-1699 Preprite ProBlock Alkyd Primer/Sealer in spray cans.
 
Floquil/Polyscale acrylic paint.
#F414137 Grimy Black
#F414329 Railroad Tie Brown
#F404076 Coach Green
 
Aluminum Ring and bridge sides were fabricated at a local fab shop 1/4" Aluminum sheet.
7/16" drive shaft and "T" bar were fabricated locally.
4' X 8' MDO board local lumber supply.
Premium grade frame lumber  local lumber supply.
Miscellaneous hardware and framing screws local supply/hardware.
Construction adhesive local supply.
Wire and connectors, from my truck.  
 

Yes, the Millhouse Turntable and Transfer tables are simply the best of the best and will be the real focal points and Crowd pleasers of your layouts.  Trust me, be sure you place Your new Turntable in an area for your train friends to gather around. The indexing Control is amazing, accurate and fun to use. You can pull your Big Boy onto this table and be assured of no wobble, no hesitation, just slow motion Fun.....Go for it, you’ll be glad you did....Happy Railroading....

 

leapinlarry posted:

Yes, the Millhouse Turntable and Transfer tables are simply the best of the best and will be the real focal points and Crowd pleasers of your layouts.  Trust me, be sure you place Your new Turntable in an area for your train friends to gather around. The indexing Control is amazing, accurate and fun to use. You can pull your Big Boy onto this table and be assured of no wobble, no hesitation, just slow motion Fun.....Go for it, you’ll be glad you did....Happy Railroading....

 

Looks like you can buy the indexer separately. So, you could buy the table for about $1650, then add the indexer later if you are on a budget.

I wonder if I could get the indexer to work with my turntable? Does anyone have a schematic for it?

George

Dave Zucal posted:

Not to sidetrack this post, but is it advised to build a round house with stall depths that match the diameter of the turntable?

Absolutely! No point in have a 34" long turntable bridge, capable of holding/turning articulated steam locomotives, with a roundhouse having only 24" deep stalls. Then on the other side of the coin, no sense in having a roundhouse with 36", or deeper stalls capable of holding large articulated locomotives, with a turntable of only, say 24".

"So, my engine shed (not a roundhouse) is not long enough for enough for my Allegheny, but my turntable is. However, I open the rear doors on my engine shed and the tender sticks out a little. This is an acceptable compromise.

George"

A compromise, but a prototypical practice from time to time, in certain situations. Compromise is the soul of progress - you still have a turntable.

Dr. Jack posted:

Have a Ross, since they came out, no problems whatever.  Easy to install, no having to cut out a circle in order to install on the layout. 

Jack

Hi Jack.  Having no experience with a turntable, I got quite an education regarding TT's in this thread.  I thought you would have to make a recess hole in your layout floor/base to accommodate the mechanism of the TT so that you could mount the TT flush to align its track with yours.  You indicated 'no having to cut out a circle to install on the layout'.  Maybe you could explain how you did that?  

JDaddy, I have the Bowser 32 inch from 22 years ago....It’s not near the same construction as the Millhouse or the Ross TT. I would love to have the Millhouse buts it would be simply to much work to change. We did modify the Bowser, added scale rail, a ballbearing 3/8 shaft, floating Bogies, etc....We use the PTC 3 NYRS Indexing system.  It works fine....If you use the big wooden wheel underneath and the friction motor, it wobbles....It was great for years ago, but the new ones today are much better.  Lots more money....1B2BA422-9497-4C0F-9DF5-2535CBEF445A2C2A3A06-9EB3-40BB-BA32-4C6F48284BF6F72916F9-6828-44FD-B195-348F7DE22A38B84BD238-A968-4CB5-A4BD-6A82841A7D8C8770705F-8874-44DD-9719-A757CA7DB4CFF683BAD9-7C53-4688-B973-811196C8072063846420-61F3-47AD-B1B2-CAFCD95CD66A

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  • F72916F9-6828-44FD-B195-348F7DE22A38
  • B84BD238-A968-4CB5-A4BD-6A82841A7D8C
  • 8770705F-8874-44DD-9719-A757CA7DB4CF
  • F683BAD9-7C53-4688-B973-811196C80720
  • 63846420-61F3-47AD-B1B2-CAFCD95CD66A

Korber 304, Base 3 stall kit,  304A, add one stall,  and 304B extension, are available, and work well with any turntable 30" to 32".  Space between the edge of the TT and the front of the Roundhouse is about 12", each TT spur track should center in the stall, at least  up to 6, 8 stalls.

The 304B extension, add on.



Edit/Add 9:00AM 9/26/21.  Older Diamond Scale TT,  an assembled kit.

IMG_2754[1]

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Last edited by Mike CT

RickM46,

I think you misunderstood Dr. Jack's earlier comment about not having to cut a circle.  If I understand correctly, the Millhouse TT comes as a circular piece of aluminum with some connected aluminum feet.  You have to cut a circle in your layout and push the aluminum circle up from the bottom so that the feet can be screwed to your benchwork.

On the other hand, the Ross TT comes already attached to a hunk of square plywood.  Thus, instead of cutting out a circle, with the Ross you just cut out a square.  Many people find a square cut less daunting than a circular cut.

Chuck

 I wanted a turntable to take to modular layout shows that was large enough for the articulated engines that club members were running.   The turntable module had to be light to be lifted solo into my van for transport to shows,  thin to allow additional modules and gear to be piled on in the van, durable to withstand handling, and simple to setup the morning of a show (less than an hour).  The turntables demonstrated at York didn't satisfy those criteria.

With my previous experience cutting circles (AKA "router on a stick") in plywood while building Dobsonian telescopes, a turntable was just another circle cutting exercise, so I broke out the router. The turntable is 34.5" (Big Boy size) in a 4ft x 4ft module frame.  The module sides frames are 1x4s with Luan plywood decking, selectively reinforced with a double layer.  The assembled weight is at the limit of what I can manage.  Construction uses a Dobsonian-inspired Formica + Teflon bearing.  The floor of the turntable well (half the bearing) rotates (yes, its not prototypical unless you consider the B&O roundhouse turntable, but works well for this module).  Appearance is tinplate with an Erector set operator's house, no fragile handrails, etc.  

I motorized the turntable using a friction drive gear motor but discovered that large locomotive weights caused slipping (this IS prototypical) of the drive system.   I considered a stepper motor, gear drive, and indexing but a solution that would eliminate slipping added unacceptable weight.  I also found that casual operators at shows needed practice to control the motor for precise positioning.  So, the motor was removed and the KISS principle now works.  Operators can use the ever-reliable Armstrong motor and optical alignment techniques for rotating the bridge to the desired track.

Slip rings on the turntable bearing for bridge track power were considered but the initial solution (a quick hack) of extra length wires that could twist and untwist has lasted nearly two decades unchanged.

Wiring toggle switches to 16 tracks was a PITA.

If you are have woodworking skills (especially with a router), building a manual turntable for Big Boys is straight forward.  Making it light and portable is an additional challenge.  Wiring is always tedious.  You can do this for $100 in materials and your labor.  Scale appearance and detailing are up to you.  The difference between a DIY manual drive solution and the $$$$ turntables shown at York are in the reliable motorization and indexing systems the vendors offer, plus the nice scale details.  Having a turntable in your layout is a real plus.  At our modular shows, turntable operations always draw a crowd of spectators and, with the slow speed operation of today's locomotives, running locos in out of storage tracks is fun.  You really need one on your layout - DIY or buy one - you won't be disappointed.

John

repair technician posted:

George how long is your actual track length on the turntable? looks like it could take the longest engine!

thanks for your input

Alan

 

I believe it is 36" of Atlas track. It has been a few years since I built it, but that was my goal. It should handle the longest engines with their tenders, e.g. BigBoy, Allegheny, etc.

George

Tracker John posted:

 I wanted a turntable to take to modular layout shows that was large enough for the articulated engines that club members were running.   The turntable module had to be light to be lifted solo into my van for transport to shows,  thin to allow additional modules and gear to be piled on in the van, durable to withstand handling, and simple to setup the morning of a show (less than an hour).  The turntables demonstrated at York didn't satisfy those criteria.

With my previous experience cutting circles (AKA "router on a stick") in plywood while building Dobsonian telescopes, a turntable was just another circle cutting exercise, so I broke out the router. The turntable is 34.5" (Big Boy size) in a 4ft x 4ft module frame.  The module sides frames are 1x4s with Luan plywood decking, selectively reinforced with a double layer.  The assembled weight is at the limit of what I can manage.  Construction uses a Dobsonian-inspired Formica + Teflon bearing.  The floor of the turntable well (half the bearing) rotates (yes, its not prototypical unless you consider the B&O roundhouse turntable, but works well for this module).  Appearance is tinplate with an Erector set operator's house, no fragile handrails, etc.  

I motorized the turntable using a friction drive gear motor but discovered that large locomotive weights caused slipping (this IS prototypical) of the drive system.   I considered a stepper motor, gear drive, and indexing but a solution that would eliminate slipping added unacceptable weight.  I also found that casual operators at shows needed practice to control the motor for precise positioning.  So, the motor was removed and the KISS principle now works.  Operators can use the ever-reliable Armstrong motor and optical alignment techniques for rotating the bridge to the desired track.

Slip rings on the turntable bearing for bridge track power were considered but the initial solution (a quick hack) of extra length wires that could twist and untwist has lasted nearly two decades unchanged.

Wiring toggle switches to 16 tracks was a PITA.

If you are have woodworking skills (especially with a router), building a manual turntable for Big Boys is straight forward.  Making it light and portable is an additional challenge.  Wiring is always tedious.  You can do this for $100 in materials and your labor.  Scale appearance and detailing are up to you.  The difference between a DIY manual drive solution and the $$$$ turntables shown at York are in the reliable motorization and indexing systems the vendors offer, plus the nice scale details.  Having a turntable in your layout is a real plus.  At our modular shows, turntable operations always draw a crowd of spectators and, with the slow speed operation of today's locomotives, running locos in out of storage tracks is fun.  You really need one on your layout - DIY or buy one - you won't be disappointed.

John

John,

 

I just saw this thread. I just wanted to point out with our TT the circular hole is great for tight installations where you don't have room for a large square top. Our TT has all the support it needs since it is welded aluminum. One feature you will like for a traveling layout is our bridge lifts out of out tables with one wire disconnect. This allows you to put the bridge in a separate travel case from the pit so the details on the bridge don't get damaged during transit. 2nd point on circular hole, it is easy to install. remove bridge from TT, flip TT over on top of layout and trace outside of pit wall onto plywood, slide TT up through hole in layout and install mounting bolts in welded tabs. Done

Most people have it installed and running in about an hour.

Oh, and if layout design changes, or if it was installed into a permanent layout. To remove TT simply remove mounting bolts and drop out for next house or layout spot without any damage or chiseling scenery from TT where our tables with wood tops have all the scenery material attached to them. Ours, the scenery only touches the outside of the aluminum pit wall. 

I just thought I would point out the design benefits of our table over the wood square top tables.

Enjoy

 

CSX Al posted:
Tracker John posted:

 I wanted a turntable to take to modular layout shows that was large enough for the articulated engines that club members were running.   The turntable module had to be light to be lifted solo into my van for transport to shows,  thin to allow additional modules and gear to be piled on in the van, durable to withstand handling, and simple to setup the morning of a show (less than an hour).  The turntables demonstrated at York didn't satisfy those criteria.

With my previous experience cutting circles (AKA "router on a stick") in plywood while building Dobsonian telescopes, a turntable was just another circle cutting exercise, so I broke out the router. The turntable is 34.5" (Big Boy size) in a 4ft x 4ft module frame.  The module sides frames are 1x4s with Luan plywood decking, selectively reinforced with a double layer.  The assembled weight is at the limit of what I can manage.  Construction uses a Dobsonian-inspired Formica + Teflon bearing.  The floor of the turntable well (half the bearing) rotates (yes, its not prototypical unless you consider the B&O roundhouse turntable, but works well for this module).  Appearance is tinplate with an Erector set operator's house, no fragile handrails, etc.  

I motorized the turntable using a friction drive gear motor but discovered that large locomotive weights caused slipping (this IS prototypical) of the drive system.   I considered a stepper motor, gear drive, and indexing but a solution that would eliminate slipping added unacceptable weight.  I also found that casual operators at shows needed practice to control the motor for precise positioning.  So, the motor was removed and the KISS principle now works.  Operators can use the ever-reliable Armstrong motor and optical alignment techniques for rotating the bridge to the desired track.

Slip rings on the turntable bearing for bridge track power were considered but the initial solution (a quick hack) of extra length wires that could twist and untwist has lasted nearly two decades unchanged.

Wiring toggle switches to 16 tracks was a PITA.

If you are have woodworking skills (especially with a router), building a manual turntable for Big Boys is straight forward.  Making it light and portable is an additional challenge.  Wiring is always tedious.  You can do this for $100 in materials and your labor.  Scale appearance and detailing are up to you.  The difference between a DIY manual drive solution and the $$$$ turntables shown at York are in the reliable motorization and indexing systems the vendors offer, plus the nice scale details.  Having a turntable in your layout is a real plus.  At our modular shows, turntable operations always draw a crowd of spectators and, with the slow speed operation of today's locomotives, running locos in out of storage tracks is fun.  You really need one on your layout - DIY or buy one - you won't be disappointed.

John

John,

 

I just saw this thread. I just wanted to point out with our TT the circular hole is great for tight installations where you don't have room for a large square top. Our TT has all the support it needs since it is welded aluminum. One feature you will like for a traveling layout is our bridge lifts out of out tables with one wire disconnect. This allows you to put the bridge in a separate travel case from the pit so the details on the bridge don't get damaged during transit. 2nd point on circular hole, it is easy to install. remove bridge from TT, flip TT over on top of layout and trace outside of pit wall onto plywood, slide TT up through hole in layout and install mounting bolts in welded tabs. Done

Most people have it installed and running in about an hour.

Oh, and if layout design changes, or if it was installed into a permanent layout. To remove TT simply remove mounting bolts and drop out for next house or layout spot without any damage or chiseling scenery from TT where our tables with wood tops have all the scenery material attached to them. Ours, the scenery only touches the outside of the aluminum pit wall. 

I just thought I would point out the design benefits of our table over the wood square top tables.

Enjoy

 

I have to attest to Al’s post. I’m not a big guy and I was able to get my 28 inch MRS TT installed in about an hour all by myself. 

RickM46 posted:
Dr. Jack posted:

Have a Ross, since they came out, no problems whatever.  Easy to install, no having to cut out a circle in order to install on the layout. 

Jack

Hi Jack.  Having no experience with a turntable, I got quite an education regarding TT's in this thread.  I thought you would have to make a recess hole in your layout floor/base to accommodate the mechanism of the TT so that you could mount the TT flush to align its track with yours.  You indicated 'no having to cut out a circle to install on the layout'.  Maybe you could explain how you did that?  

Rick,

It is a very simple process to mount our TT. Simply unplug bridge with one wire disconnect for table, lift out. turn pit upside down on layout top, trace pit wall on layout, cut hole, insert up through hole and fasten tabs to layout plywood. That's it. Have trains running in about an hour.   

PRR1950 posted:

So CSX Al, does your turntable magically adjust to different plywood widths used by builders?  Does it magically adjust based on whether or not the installer uses homasote on top of the plywood?  Methinks you brag a little too much about how easy installation is.

Chuck

Chuck, like Al says above the turntable has 1.5" of adjustment.  If your plywood/homasote, cork, foam, whatever sandwich is less than that thick then his table will fit fine.  Given my experience with Al, if your sandwich is thicker than that then he can custom-build a turntable that will fit your sandwich.  Methinks he tells it like it is.  As someone in the sports world once said, "If it's true then it ain't bragging."

Millhouse, hands down, it’s the best made, best looking, a one time purchase and will last you a Lifetime, offering unlimited pleasure…. Enjoy. It can be controlled several ways, one bring with your Legacy Remote, or simply use the keypad…. It’s a Wow.. If you divide the cost by 15 years of fun, it’s not expensive at all. Great Question. It will be the Focal Point of your Railroad.

To reverse a loco, it only needs to turn 180°. Is the B&O Mus. example the only one that existed in prototype, no short line, mining road, logging example known?  And has anybody ordered or built one of these three brands discussed...or ? commercial brand detailed to look like it is armstrong or a gallows turntable  I have a couple of gallows turntable kits from out of the past, but they look very flimsy for operation, even manual, much less powered. I have seen prototype photos of very short turntables turning Alaskan rail "critter", and streetcars, but doubt if anyone has built a powered model.

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