spotted this on da bay a couple weeks ago. Had one Postwar truck, wasn't thinking of getting it since I already have one.. Happened to glance in the parts bin, and I had an extra Prewar truck, so I had no choice but to make an offer on it.

 

2757

Dave

 

 

 

Saving Tinplate One Piece at a Time

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More live steam!

Bassett Lowke made, as shown in the catalogue of 1911, some spirit fired locomotives to a gauge of 3 and a quarter inch (scale 1:17). I do not know whether these were meant to be run pulling the "engineer" or that you were expected to have a large (scenic) layout. In the catalogue are also some carriages shown. Three and a quarter inch was soon abandoned and 3.5 inch is now one of the model engineering gauges. I found a Bassett Lowke  GNR (Great Northern Railway) Atlantic 4-4-2 with this gauge and planned to restore it. I could not, but a friend started on it and last Sunday it was fired up for the first time in, I do not know how, many years.

Is it tinplate? Well, it is vintage!

Regards

Fred

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Fair enough Chris. Here's some of my favorite "goods wagons" although they are fantasy...to a point.  They are KBN and are part of a series of larger 8 wheel freights.  Besides the attractive lithography what makes them even more interesting is their nod to the real world.  Each of the boxcars has reporting marks for different German cities and the cities correspond to what the cars are representing.

For example - the Banana Wagen - neat litho and ...

KBN_Lg_Bananen

reporting marks fro Bremen 

KBN_Lg_Bananen_Report

...so what does Bremen have to do with bananas?  Easy - Bremen was/is a major seaport and a seaport is where one could expect to find imported goods such as Bananas.

  The Kuhlwagen

KBN_Lg_Kuhlwagen

with reporting marks from Augsburg

KBN_Lg_Kuhlwagen_Report

...and it is plenty cool in Augsburg particularly in the winter.

Then there is the California Frucht Transport

KBN_Lg_California_Frucht_Transport

with reporting marks from Berlin

KBN_Lg_California_Frucht_Transport_Report

Why Berlin?  Well, Berlin was/is the capital and it always had a large population of people with money...the kind of people who could afford to purchase exotic fruit imports from California.

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Great postings this week folks.

This set was never marketed by American Flyer but it is all American Flyer made.

The 3020 Box Cab engine is from the 1922-1925 era.

The cars are from the end of the era when the Illini cars were marketed; probably from 1933-1934.  

The baggage car has brown doors; likely leftovers from the Columbia cars. The color of the doors matches the color of the engine pretty well. Notice too that the two passenger cars are the variations that have several windows that are unpunched.

Have a Great Tinplate Weekend 

Northwoods Flyer

Greg

                                                             

A big new station in the collection, 1,25 metres long (42 1/2 inch)

In the English Bing catalog 1912 he is under number 30266 to find. However, it has to be reworked a bit, there are 2 benches and 2 lamps on the platforms missing.

Everything is a plug-in system, the fences, the canopy and the wall to the right of the building are just plugged in.

This station is full of adverts, many of which can not be found on the smaller English train stations.

bi-30266-01bi-30266-02bi-30266-03bi-30266-04bi-30266-05bi-30266-06bi-30266-07bi-30266-08bi-30266-09bi-30266-10bi-30266-11bi-30266-12bi-30266-13bi-30266-14

 

Arne

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Robert S. Butler posted:

Fair enough Chris. Here's some of my favorite "goods wagons" although they are fantasy...to a point.  They are KBN and are part of a series of larger 8 wheel freights.  Besides the attractive lithography what makes them even more interesting is their nod to the real world.  Each of the boxcars has reporting marks for different German cities and the cities correspond to what the cars are representing.

For example - the Banana Wagen - neat litho and ...

KBN_Lg_Bananen

reporting marks fro Bremen 

KBN_Lg_Bananen_Report

...so what does Bremen have to do with bananas?  Easy - Bremen was/is a major seaport and a seaport is where could expect to see imported goods such as Bananas.

  The Kuhlwagen

KBN_Lg_Kuhlwagen

with reporting marks from Augsburg

KBN_Lg_Kuhlwagen_Report

...and it is plenty cool in Augsburg particularly in the winter.

Then there is the California Frucht Transport

KBN_Lg_California_Frucht_Transport

with reporting marks from Berlin

KBN_Lg_California_Frucht_Transport_Report

Why Berlin?  Well, Berlin was/is the capital and it always had a large population of people with money...the kind of people who could afford to purchase exotic fruit imports from California.

Munich Milk Wagen

8-wheel Milch-wagen

Nuremberg Baggage car

20508 8-wheel baggage car

Hamburg Int'l Express Wagen

8-wheel intl transport AG box car

4-wheel Union Dortmund boxcar

union dortmund 10507 boxcar

Jim O'C

Upstate NY/So VT

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B152DF33-36BC-4F98-B8D0-F7DEBB5DEA52E413CC17-CF7C-4C96-9363-4B4DB5C43C49

I stray a little by heading this consist with a modern 700E, but I do believe that it fits in with tinplate at its heart. Discovering these post-war adapters makes it easy too. Represented also is a vintage Marklin spur 1 switch tower which is in need of some restoration. 

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sncf231e posted:

More live steam!

Bassett Lowke made, as shown in the catalogue of 1911, some spirit fired locomotives to a gauge of 3 and a quarter inch (scale 1:17). I do not know whether these were meant to be run pulling the "engineer" or that you were expected to have a large (scenic) layout. In the catalogue are also some carriages shown. Three and a quarter inch was soon abandoned and 3.5 inch is now one of the model engineering gauges. I found a Bassett Lowke  GNR (Great Northern Railway) Atlantic 4-4-2 with this gauge and planned to restore it. I could not, but a friend started on it and last Sunday it was fired up for the first time in, I do not know how, many years.

 

Is it tinplate? Well, it is vintage!

Regards

Fred

Fred, maybe more steel plate than tin but that is a really wonderfull piece, well restored and i think you can find the small missing parts. Even if it is not an easy loco to run that makes a terrific loco to display, I really would enjoy to find one....

Very best, Daniel

DANIEL and FRED: You fellows NEVER disappoint! That #3 gauge Bassett-Lowke is the cat's meow! CHRIS and RSB's goods wagons are colorful and pleasing to the eye. LOVE that bananen car! One question: Does anyone make #3 gauge track, or do you have to search for originals?

vita sine litteris mors est  (Seneca)

Tinplate Art posted:

DANIEL: That is very nice GIL live steamer and box! Have you fired up that little jewel?

Art, not yet fired and as it is new in box  I have some hesitation to do it..... live steam always cause some damages and this piece is rare, just a hundred where made. The best thing to do would be to find another one in used condition.

PhillyChris posted:

B152DF33-36BC-4F98-B8D0-F7DEBB5DEA52

I stray a little by heading this consist with a modern 700E, but I do believe that it fits in with tinplate at its heart. Discovering these post-war adapters makes it easy too. Represented also is a vintage Marklin spur 1 switch tower which is in need of some restoration. 

I mix and match all the time.  I haven't had much luck with the adapters so I built a transition car with prewar latch couplers on one end and modern lobster claw one the other.  I like to sometimes pull my LCT hoppers with a GG-1 or modern diesel.

IMG_3705

Here's a 0-6-0 pulling some small tinplate

IMG_3772

The transition car itself

Sorry for the poor video.  Here's a 261e pulling modern freight cars....

 

And a way to double head tinplate with modern steam.

It's all about having fun

May God Bless us all.

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IMG_3707
IMG_3721

Even though most all my Marx is 8 wheel, I have always wanted this one. It only came in 4 wheel, so I bit the bullet a few weeks ago. One of many freight and passenger combo sets Marx produced. Very nice condition but the box is a bit rough.

Steve

003187A4-A2AC-4E99-ACF2-C74F3AE015AA5FD233F6-9341-46FE-B06E-02A4FA3FA55339FD5166-6792-4BEA-BBE4-63F3D1D143DC

Steve "Papa" Eastman

Yorba Linda, CA

Left Coast, Home of the lunatics

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WoW! some amazing stuff in this weekends thread already!

To quote and gush over each post would take up a whole 'nother thread!

I shall drop everyone back to reality with my humble offering today

Currently winging its way into the southern hemisphere from the Nederlands is a charming ( well to me anyway) little boxed set from I presume the late 40's to perhaps the mid 50's ( U.S. Zone was made a point by the seller , but I am not sure about that by the wheels  ) and I think going by the mark on the box a Bub set (?)

It was available for quite some time at quite a fair price , but then the seller just had to drop the opening bid to a point where I truly could not ignore it ( I have paid more for far worse ) ... Until I have it in hand I will reserve judgement , but it really doesnt look played with that much ... I suspect it might be a later set tho , due to what appears the hard plastic wheels?  Nevertheless its a darn good example of how well kids used to care for toys back then

Clockwork guys have a spring in their step!

Fatman posted:

WoW! some amazing stuff in this weekends thread already!

To quote and gush over each post would take up a whole 'nother thread!

I shall drop everyone back to reality with my humble offering today

Currently winging its way into the southern hemisphere from the Nederlands is a charming ( well to me anyway) little boxed set from I presume the late 40's to perhaps the mid 50's ( U.S. Zone was made a point by the seller , but I am not sure about that by the wheels  ) and I think going by the mark on the box a Bub set (?)

It was available for quite some time at quite a fair price , but then the seller just had to drop the opening bid to a point where I truly could not ignore it ( I have paid more for far worse ) ... Until I have it in hand I will reserve judgement , but it really doesnt look played with that much ... I suspect it might be a later set tho , due to what appears the hard plastic wheels?  Nevertheless its a darn good example of how well kids used to care for toys back then

Nice little train but that trademark is not from BUB but  from Beckh, look here https://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/...55#74777184323368055 and here: https://www.historytoy.com/toy...Trains-Beckh-Gauge-0

Regards

Fred

sncf231e posted:

Nice little train but that trademark is not from BUB but  from Beckh, look here https://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/...55#74777184323368055 and here: https://www.historytoy.com/toy...Trains-Beckh-Gauge-0

Regards

Fred

Thank you so much @sncf231e

Fred it was bugging me something terrible , I KNEW I had seen that trademark before but for the life of me did not make the Beckh connection , hence why I marked it Bub(?) , I know post war there were many vendors selling pretty much the same thing , bub, distler, etc etc

I was familiar with the later (?) "Swooping B" on later Ottmar Beckh sets

And had seen the laying down B on this set before elsewhere but had not connected them ...

Your knowledge and willingness to share it humbles me, you are such an asset to the community!

 

Edit ... so by this timeline I just found, it marks the set as between 1952-57

Clockwork guys have a spring in their step!

Tinplate Art posted:

DANIEL and FRED: You fellows NEVER disappoint! That #3 gauge Bassett-Lowke is the cat's meow! 

One question: Does anyone make #3 gauge track, or do you have to search for originals?

Thank you Tinplate Art,

There is a lot of confusion about the gauge name and numbers in the larger gauges, but the locomotive in my post is not #3 gauge; it is 3.25 inch gauge (83 mm) and that gauge has never got a proper name. Gauges of 62, 64 and 72 mm have been called Gauge 3 or Gauge III and according to the newest MOROP standards Gauge III is now 89 mm; the NMRA wisely refrain from giving gauge names and numbers in the larger gauges. The 3.25 inch gauge was introduced by Bassett Lowke in the beginning of the previous century, but rather soon abandoned even if they catalogued a large range. Bassett Lowke sold track parts with wooden sleepers, but these were used for more gauges.

Regards

Fred

Fatman posted:

Oh and a couple of Bing wagons from a mate in the UK

( and yep I bought the clockwork boat too .. another rabbit hole to go down ! )

That´s no Bing cars, they are complete different.

They are made by Bassett-Lowke. The left:  LMS 20-Ton Goods Brake Van No 1360/0 and right LMS 12-Ton Covered Goods Wagon No 1370/0.

Both made around 1930.

 

Arne

Arne posted:
Fatman posted:

Oh and a couple of Bing wagons from a mate in the UK

( and yep I bought the clockwork boat too .. another rabbit hole to go down ! )

 

That´s no Bing cars, they are complete different.

They are made by Bassett-Lowke. The left:  LMS 20-Ton Goods Brake Van No 1360/0 and right LMS 12-Ton Covered Goods Wagon No 1370/0.

Both made around 1930.

 

Arne

I tell you what .. my identification from photo's is copping a hit this week LOL !

Thanks again Arne !  Looks like I might have to question my source in the UK a bit more when he says "I've got  ......   you want ?"

I think anything not Hornby he says is Bing

Anyway thats a lovely Hornby boat .... Just kidding I KNOW its a Sutcliffe , but I wanted to get three out of three wrong today

Clockwork guys have a spring in their step!

Jim O'C posted:
Robert S. Butler posted:

Fair enough Chris. Here's some of my favorite "goods wagons" although they are fantasy...to a point.  They are KBN and are part of a series of larger 8 wheel freights.  Besides the attractive lithography what makes them even more interesting is their nod to the real world.  Each of the boxcars has reporting marks for different German cities and the cities correspond to what the cars are representing.

For example - the Banana Wagen - neat litho and ...

KBN_Lg_Bananen

reporting marks fro Bremen 

KBN_Lg_Bananen_Report

...so what does Bremen have to do with bananas?  Easy - Bremen was/is a major seaport and a seaport is where could expect to see imported goods such as Bananas.

  The Kuhlwagen

KBN_Lg_Kuhlwagen

with reporting marks from Augsburg

KBN_Lg_Kuhlwagen_Report

...and it is plenty cool in Augsburg particularly in the winter.

Then there is the California Frucht Transport

KBN_Lg_California_Frucht_Transport

with reporting marks from Berlin

KBN_Lg_California_Frucht_Transport_Report

Why Berlin?  Well, Berlin was/is the capital and it always had a large population of people with money...the kind of people who could afford to purchase exotic fruit imports from California.

Munich Milk Wagen

8-wheel Milch-wagen

Nuremberg Baggage car

20508 8-wheel baggage car

Hamburg Int'l Express Wagen

8-wheel intl transport AG box car

4-wheel Union Dortmund boxcar

union dortmund 10507 boxcar

Love these Karl Bub O gauge 8-wheel wagons. I recently picked this one up, amazing colors! As mentioned in the previous post, they're large for this era, this one also has interesting spoked wheels. In the last shot it's posed with a JEP PO steeplecab electric loco. Now that I see how nice this one is, I'll have to keep my eyes out for the others in this series.

KBN Internationale Transport AG car 2KBN Internationale Transport AG car 3KBN Internationale Transport AG car 4KBN Internationale Transport AG car

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A few news in the collection

Brimtoy warehouse in green

08-16-01

Elastolin newspaper seller

08-16-02

Bing suitcases

08-16-03

Heinrich Fischer railroad crossing (needs repair)

08-16-04

Heinrich Fischer small station "Uxbridge"

08-16-0508-16-06

Bing small coaches from around 1905

08-16-07

Brimtoy the first crane car (needs a new roof)

08-16-08

Wells of London Tank car

08-16-09

Distler rare loco of the 30s, a new spring is arrived today.

08-16-10

 

Greetings

Arne

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