I received a Number 38 Lionel Loco in to service and re-attach a loose wheel.

Could someone tell me what the quartering is for the wheels as this loco has side rods??

The wheel that needs to be mounted is loose so I don't want to attach and re-attach it.

 

Original Post

A 38 is a boxcab locomotive, so no it does not have side rods and would not need to be quartered.

Steam engines, which typically have side rods, which generally connect between the wheels on each side, need to have the wheels installed so that the holes for attaching the side rods line up with the other wheels on the same side.

Quartering is best described in this link

http://www.wwfry.org/pics/Stea...motiveQuartering.pdf

NWL

Wheels are typically quartered 90 degrees apart. If the wheels are geared, plus they have side rods, sometimes they are not quartered at all, like the Lionel Generals.

At any rate, look at the wheel on the opposite side from the loose one and do it like that.

RoyBoy

Nation Wide Lines posted:

A 38 is a boxcab locomotive, so no it does not have side rods and would not need to be quartered.

Steam engines, which typically have side rods, which generally connect between the wheels on each side, need to have the wheels installed so that the holes for attaching the side rods line up with the other wheels on the same side.

Quartering is best described in this link

http://www.wwfry.org/pics/Stea...motiveQuartering.pdf

NWL

Many of the early Lionel standard gauge locomotives had side rods, including 38, 42 and 53.

Steam cylinders are double acting so there are two power strokes per cylinder.
Since thee is two cylinders (one on each side) and for the train to reverse with no dead spots the wheels should be quartered at 90 degrees, so there is a power stroke at ever 90 degrees for the full 360 degrees for one revolution.

Now that that being said, as long as the wheels are set to the same degree on both sides. as you will only be looking at one side at a time, unless there is someone counting the rivets of the Loco. I call this the 2 foot rule, as when it stands at 2 ft or more it is perfect!

RonH

Don't Junk it, Make it Work!

 

Quartering is just that. Left wheels 1/4 revolution from right wheels. The best way I know to re-quarter your #38 is with a set of wheel cups made for standard gauge and an arbor press proper. You can use the old trick of trying to knurl an axle end to take up looseness, or try a drop of Loctite Red.

CJ Meyers

 

It is best done if the axles are first secured to the geared wheels. Properly align the geared wheels in the frame with the gears engaged with the intermediate gear. Assuming that only one wheel needs to be reattached, make sure that there is no grease/oil in the axle hole or on the axle end. The axle end needs to be somewhat expanded/ridged with a cold chisel. Oft times that last step needs to be done after inserting through the bearings or axle holes in this case. An extra pair of hands is welcome for that step. Carefully align the loose wheel with the wheel that is adjacent. This can be done visually by carefully looking at the spokes. Once aligned, lightly tap the center of the loose wheel onto the end of the axle and transfer this assembly to an arbor press while keeping the geared wheels engaged. Carefully align in the press and press the wheel fully onto the axle. Be sure this last operation is square and that there is still a slight amount of free play when the wheel assembly is shifted side to side. No glue or lock-tight! Good luck!

Eric TCA, LCCA, Ives Train Society     

On toy trains with all geared wheels, the quartering does not have to nearly as precise as scale models.    With all geared wheels, the side rods carry  no load and are just along for the ride, so if they are out of quarter, it is a visual effect.   You can file the holes in the side rods a little sloppy and create a situation when they don't bind.

On a model with a gearbox on one axles and then that axle transfers power to the other axles through the side rods, quartering is critical to make the loco run and run smoothly.     Most brass steamers and high end steam models are built with this kind of mechanism.     A quartering jig which most of do not have at home is pretty much needed to do this if the wheel is already loose.    If  you are about to loosen it and it is in quarter, you can scribe the axle and wheel center a little and remount matching the scribe marks.

Nation Wide Lines posted:

A 38 is a boxcab locomotive, so no it does not have side rods and would not need to be quartered.

Steam engines, which typically have side rods, which generally connect between the wheels on each side, need to have the wheels installed so that the holes for attaching the side rods line up with the other wheels on the same side.

Quartering is best described in this link

http://www.wwfry.org/pics/Stea...motiveQuartering.pdf

NWL

The 38 does have side rods and they must be quartered.

I think they are all 90 degrees apart. That is same as steam engines and keeps the side rods working together well.

Jim

Jim Waterman

Lee Lines Limited

Custom Built Standard Gauge

 

prrjim posted:

On toy trains with all geared wheels, the quartering does not have to nearly as precise as scale models.    With all geared wheels, the side rods carry  no load and are just along for the ride, so if they are out of quarter, it is a visual effect.   You can file the holes in the side rods a little sloppy and create a situation when they don't bind.

On a model with a gearbox on one axles and then that axle transfers power to the other axles through the side rods, quartering is critical to make the loco run and run smoothly.     Most brass steamers and high end steam models are built with this kind of mechanism.     A quartering jig which most of do not have at home is pretty much needed to do this if the wheel is already loose.    If  you are about to loosen it and it is in quarter, you can scribe the axle and wheel center a little and remount matching the scribe marks.

Best to get them close to 90 degrees apart. more than a little and it can bind.

Jim Waterman

Lee Lines Limited

Custom Built Standard Gauge

 

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