I think the picture below would meet the criteria for "making anything cool", the only issue is that I took the picture and submitted it to the editor of the Train Collectors Quarterly back in January so, even though it is the cover of the just published July issue of the Quarterly, it might not meet the criteria for "lately". 

  As the opening credits of many movies state "the following is based on true events" - the key word is based - I did take some artistic license.

  The full story from Southern Railway Remembered is as follows:

"At the Alexandria Station the main line tracks separated into freight train tracks and passenger train tracks. The freight tracks, behind the northbound passenger waiting room, went into Potomac Yard. One morning a southbound train stopped right in front of the passenger sheds to wait for clearance. From the Alexandria station past Duke Street was a long curve, and incoming freight trains had a signal just before they got to the Duke Street Bridge. Because of the curve, northbound engineers had to depend on their firemen to 
let them know whether or not the signal was clear.

An RF&P freight was coming in, and when it got close to the curve the engineer asked his fireman how the signal was. The fireman replied," I can't see the signal for that caboose is blocking my view." The engineer threw the brakes into emergency-too late! He rammed the Southern caboose and stood it on end. The flagman saw him coming in time to get out of the way. He took off down Duke Street. Someone stopped him and asked why he was in such a hurry. He pointed back toward the bridge; the caboose was on fire, and flames were going high above the bridge. Fortunately, the Southern conductor had already started walking to the front of his train when the train struck so no one was injured. There were some hard feelings however. The conductor had bought a couple of hams in Monroe and left them on the caboose. By the time he got back to what was left of the caboose, his hams were cooked well done".

The diorama  

  For the diorama I first did a trial set up to get a sense of camera angles and the distance I would need to be away from the setup in order to guarantee everything was in focus.  I had originally thought about having a wrecking crane in the background but the camera angle was such that the boom from the crane was more of a distraction than a complementary element to the picture.  I tried different station locations and tried to think of things that would decrease the blank space above the main picture elements.  I settled on the water tower and played with different positions of the tower, the station and positions of the wreck – particularly the locomotive. 

   In the first attempts I thought too much of the engine was concealed.  After a couple of tries I finally found a derailed position that permitted one to see most of the front of the engine even with the caboose hanging in the position it was in.  I dismantled one gondola to scatter wheel sets and I removed the wheels and axles from one of the caboose trucks.

 Once I had the basic setup, I spent some time arranging figures – I took a number of test shots with figures in various locations trying to make the figures the focal point.  The main issue with the figures was that I wanted to have a hapless fireman trying to explain things to the division manager with the engineer just looking on.  Since I couldn't find any figures to match my needs for the fireman and the division super I kitbashed them. 

  The fireman with his palms turn outward in supplication is a heavily modified Plasticville figure.  In order to get the right pose I spent a lot of time running between my wife's full length mirror in the bedroom and my work bench. I would stand in front of the mirror, take the stance I wanted to create, stare at my reflection for awhile, run down to the basement, sculpt a little of the figure, add a little squadron green putty, etc. and repeat.  

  The division super is a heavily modified Bachmann figure.  The figure didn't scale out to 1:48 so I had to do some serious surgery with respect to sectioning his arms, legs and torso to "cut him down to size."

  The engineer and the older railroad employee looking at the wrecked engine are commercial cast figures I painted and the intrepid newshound with the camera is from the Arttista Gazette.

  As for the artistic license - the actual wreck only involved the destruction of the caboose - there was no derailment of the train that hit it.

TCQ2019

Attachments

Photos (1)
Robert S. Butler posted:

  I think the picture below would meet the criteria for "making anything cool", the only issue is that I took the picture and submitted it to the editor of the Train Collectors Quarterly back in January so, even though it is the cover of the just published July issue of the Quarterly, it might not meet the criteria for "lately". 

  As the opening credits of many movies state "the following is based on true events" - the key word is based - I did take some artistic license.

  The full story from Southern Railway Remembered is as follows:

"At the Alexandria Station the main line tracks separated into freight train tracks and passenger train tracks. The freight tracks, behind the northbound passenger waiting room, went into Potomac Yard. One morning a southbound train stopped right in front of the passenger sheds to wait for clearance. From the Alexandria station past Duke Street was a long curve, and incoming freight trains had a signal just before they got to the Duke Street Bridge. Because of the curve, northbound engineers had to depend on their firemen to 
let them know whether or not the signal was clear.

An RF&P freight was coming in, and when it got close to the curve the engineer asked his fireman how the signal was. The fireman replied," I can't see the signal for that caboose is blocking my view." The engineer threw the brakes into emergency-too late! He rammed the Southern caboose and stood it on end. The flagman saw him coming in time to get out of the way. He took off down Duke Street. Someone stopped him and asked why he was in such a hurry. He pointed back toward the bridge; the caboose was on fire, and flames were going high above the bridge. Fortunately, the Southern conductor had already started walking to the front of his train when the train struck so no one was injured. There were some hard feelings however. The conductor had bought a couple of hams in Monroe and left them on the caboose. By the time he got back to what was left of the caboose, his hams were cooked well done".

The diorama  

  For the diorama I first did a trial set up to get a sense of camera angles and the distance I would need to be away from the setup in order to guarantee everything was in focus.  I had originally thought about having a wrecking crane in the background but the camera angle was such that the boom from the crane was more of a distraction than a complementary element to the picture.  I tried different station locations and tried to think of things that would decrease the blank space above the main picture elements.  I settled on the water tower and played with different positions of the tower, the station and positions of the wreck – particularly the locomotive. 

   In the first attempts I thought too much of the engine was concealed.  After a couple of tries I finally found a derailed position that permitted one to see most of the front of the engine even with the caboose hanging in the position it was in.  I dismantled one gondola to scatter wheel sets and I removed the wheels and axles from one of the caboose trucks.

 Once I had the basic setup, I spent some time arranging figures – I took a number of test shots with figures in various locations trying to make the figures the focal point.  The main issue with the figures was that I wanted to have a hapless fireman trying to explain things to the division manager with the engineer just looking on.  Since I couldn't find any figures to match my needs for the fireman and the division super I kitbashed them. 

  The fireman with his palms turn outward in supplication is a heavily modified Plasticville figure.  In order to get the right pose I spent a lot of time running between my wife's full length mirror in the bedroom and my work bench. I would stand in front of the mirror, take the stance I wanted to create, stare at my reflection for awhile, run down to the basement, sculpt a little of the figure, add a little squadron green putty, etc. and repeat.  

  The division super is a heavily modified Bachmann figure.  The figure didn't scale out to 1:48 so I had to do some serious surgery with respect to sectioning his arms, legs and torso to "cut him down to size."

  The engineer and the older railroad employee looking at the wrecked engine are commercial cast figures I painted and the intrepid newshound with the camera is from the Arttista Gazette.

  As for the artistic license - the actual wreck only involved the destruction of the caboose - there was no derailment of the train that hit it.

TCQ2019

Makes me think of some of Ward's cover photo's.

Steve

Steve "Papa" Eastman

Yorba Linda, CA

Left Coast, Home of the lunatics

@Arne @sncf231e thanks for the feedback regarding the Hornby station! I like the one that was previously posted- Man was that cool! That said, for now at least, I’m gonna keep mine as is- although stairs in the future would be cool!

and thanks again, @Arne, for the info about the KB Bing double logo. Happen to have a solely Bing version similar to the first picture you posted.

image

Also is my first Bing car, in general, so that one has  got a special place with me. I do like the gold trim paint that KBN added , nice touch.

Attachments

Photos (1)
Robert S. Butler posted:

  I think the picture below would meet the criteria for "making anything cool", the only issue is that I took the picture and submitted it to the editor of the Train Collectors Quarterly back in January so, even though it is the cover of the just published July issue of the Quarterly, it might not meet the criteria for "lately". 

  As the opening credits of many movies state "the following is based on true events" - the key word is based - I did take some artistic license.

  The full story from Southern Railway Remembered is as follows:

"At the Alexandria Station the main line tracks separated into freight train tracks and passenger train tracks. The freight tracks, behind the northbound passenger waiting room, went into Potomac Yard. One morning a southbound train stopped right in front of the passenger sheds to wait for clearance. From the Alexandria station past Duke Street was a long curve, and incoming freight trains had a signal just before they got to the Duke Street Bridge. Because of the curve, northbound engineers had to depend on their firemen to 
let them know whether or not the signal was clear.

An RF&P freight was coming in, and when it got close to the curve the engineer asked his fireman how the signal was. The fireman replied," I can't see the signal for that caboose is blocking my view." The engineer threw the brakes into emergency-too late! He rammed the Southern caboose and stood it on end. The flagman saw him coming in time to get out of the way. He took off down Duke Street. Someone stopped him and asked why he was in such a hurry. He pointed back toward the bridge; the caboose was on fire, and flames were going high above the bridge. Fortunately, the Southern conductor had already started walking to the front of his train when the train struck so no one was injured. There were some hard feelings however. The conductor had bought a couple of hams in Monroe and left them on the caboose. By the time he got back to what was left of the caboose, his hams were cooked well done".

The diorama  

  For the diorama I first did a trial set up to get a sense of camera angles and the distance I would need to be away from the setup in order to guarantee everything was in focus.  I had originally thought about having a wrecking crane in the background but the camera angle was such that the boom from the crane was more of a distraction than a complementary element to the picture.  I tried different station locations and tried to think of things that would decrease the blank space above the main picture elements.  I settled on the water tower and played with different positions of the tower, the station and positions of the wreck – particularly the locomotive. 

   In the first attempts I thought too much of the engine was concealed.  After a couple of tries I finally found a derailed position that permitted one to see most of the front of the engine even with the caboose hanging in the position it was in.  I dismantled one gondola to scatter wheel sets and I removed the wheels and axles from one of the caboose trucks.

 Once I had the basic setup, I spent some time arranging figures – I took a number of test shots with figures in various locations trying to make the figures the focal point.  The main issue with the figures was that I wanted to have a hapless fireman trying to explain things to the division manager with the engineer just looking on.  Since I couldn't find any figures to match my needs for the fireman and the division super I kitbashed them. 

  The fireman with his palms turn outward in supplication is a heavily modified Plasticville figure.  In order to get the right pose I spent a lot of time running between my wife's full length mirror in the bedroom and my work bench. I would stand in front of the mirror, take the stance I wanted to create, stare at my reflection for awhile, run down to the basement, sculpt a little of the figure, add a little squadron green putty, etc. and repeat.  

  The division super is a heavily modified Bachmann figure.  The figure didn't scale out to 1:48 so I had to do some serious surgery with respect to sectioning his arms, legs and torso to "cut him down to size."

  The engineer and the older railroad employee looking at the wrecked engine are commercial cast figures I painted and the intrepid newshound with the camera is from the Arttista Gazette.

  As for the artistic license - the actual wreck only involved the destruction of the caboose - there was no derailment of the train that hit it.

TCQ2019

Sam, I saw your credit for the cover when my copy arrived earlier this week. Great work! 

George

With some time off for the holiday I've been able to complete assembly of my standard gauge Kingsbury single truck Birney. The project started with the purchase of a Kingsbury floor toy trolley that someone had already very carefully taken apart and removed the old friction mechanism from. Then I lucked into a loose McCoy mechanism at the local TTOS meet that came from a John Daniels GG1. I repaired the two failing wheels with cyanoacrylate (based on advice from repair expert Larry Pearson) and removed the plastic GG1 side frames.

Mating the trolley with the drive was accomplished by cutting several slots into the old trolley floor. I then added window glazing and a pair of bulbs, and the finishing touch was a pair of Ives pilots supplied by Bruce Peterson. I still need to strengthen up the floor a bit on one end- there's a big round hole where the old friction mechanism used to be and so the whole floor bends there.

This car joins the Kingsbury double-truck Birney motor/trailer set I posted about previously. Some photos and a video are attached.Kingsbury Single Truck Birney 382 2Kingsbury Single Truck Birney 382Kingsbury BirneysKingsbury Birney conversionKingsbury Birney conversion underside

Attachments

Photos (5)
Videos (1)
Kingsbury Birney IMG_8306

Picked this up at a flea market-antique mall. Not usually a steam locomotive guy but The front coupler had me intrigued, didn’t really know what I was getting...or getting myself into lol(spent the last 10 hours working on it). Unfortunately no tender but this dude it’s pretty cool

 

15DF43C9-8339-4C82-AFA0-C2B070BA715617AFC974-5246-4B61-96BE-19DE31EB75C8

Attachments

Photos (2)
StevefromPA posted:

Picked this up at a flea market-antique mall. Not usually a steam locomotive guy but The front coupler had me intrigued, didn’t really know what I was getting...or getting myself into lol(spent the last 10 hours working on it). Unfortunately no tender but this dude it’s pretty cool

 

15DF43C9-8339-4C82-AFA0-C2B070BA715617AFC974-5246-4B61-96BE-19DE31EB75C8

Steve, you have a nice example of a prewar 203. It has a shorter boiler than the 227-series of switchers and comes with a shorter tender, with Lionel Lines instead of Pennsylvania on it. You should have a prewar box coupler on it. 

Tom

 

Haha @Steamer I’ll have to be on the look out, just make sure to knock

@MNCW thank you. I wish I had the tender after reading about this guy it seems to be a really cool loco to run with the tender that can have a bell or a light. I’d assume those tenders are probably hard to come by without the switcher attached to it. But gotta get that guy working first! 

StevefromPA posted:

Picked this up at a flea market-antique mall. Not usually a steam locomotive guy but The front coupler had me intrigued, didn’t really know what I was getting...or getting myself into lol(spent the last 10 hours working on it). Unfortunately no tender but this dude it’s pretty cool

 

15DF43C9-8339-4C82-AFA0-C2B070BA715617AFC974-5246-4B61-96BE-19DE31EB75C8

Steve,

Very, very nice!  I wish we had flea markets and antique malls here in Arkansas like the ones you obviously have in PA.  Unfortunately, we don't.  There's lots of outdoors and nature in the "Natural State" but not many toy trains like back on the East Coast.

Bob Nelson

StevefromPA posted:

Picked this up at a flea market-antique mall. Not usually a steam locomotive guy but The front coupler had me intrigued, didn’t really know what I was getting...or getting myself into lol(spent the last 10 hours working on it). Unfortunately no tender but this dude it’s pretty cool

 

15DF43C9-8339-4C82-AFA0-C2B070BA7156continu

I've had one of these since I was a boy. One of the main rods remains 'repaired', ie spliced, as we could not find a part back then. Mine has the bell tender (another repair on the bimetal wire thing that cycles the bell. Runs like a little champ. Since I was doing postwar back then, tender trucks got swapped out for postwar coupler types.

These guys seem to be pretty rare, I suspect more of the scale versions were made than these. Lionel continued with the 4 wheel version after the war (1656, 1615 etc), but this one is the real deal .

Jim

Jim Waterman

Lee Lines Limited

Custom Built Standard Gauge

 

My Ives 3250 has been giving me trouble for awhile now and finally kind of “conked out”. Don’t think the repairs should be that much- before she totally wouldn’t run she would require me to give her a little push first.

regardless, found a good deal on that auction website for an Ives 3252. Besides the light not working, runs like a champ and I like the brass plates. The green color also fits in better with My consist. Also has a reverse Lever that functions fine.

image

At the end of the day, can always count on the Lionel 254e though!

image

Also, update on the prewar 203 B6 switcher- cleaned the e-unit, took out the old wires and soldered in new ones- still no dice. Taking it to my repair guy on Tuesday. After that I’m gonna decide if I wanna keep it or sell it.

Attachments

Photos (2)
Jim Waterman posted:
StevefromPA posted:

Picked this up at a flea market-antique mall. Not usually a steam locomotive guy but The front coupler had me intrigued, didn’t really know what I was getting...or getting myself into lol(spent the last 10 hours working on it). Unfortunately no tender but this dude it’s pretty cool

 

15DF43C9-8339-4C82-AFA0-C2B070BA7156continu

I've had one of these since I was a boy. One of the main rods remains 'repaired', ie spliced, as we could not find a part back then. Mine has the bell tender (another repair on the bimetal wire thing that cycles the bell. Runs like a little champ. Since I was doing postwar back then, tender trucks got swapped out for postwar coupler types.

These guys seem to be pretty rare, I suspect more of the scale versions were made than these. Lionel continued with the 4 wheel version after the war (1656, 1615 etc), but this one is the real deal .

Jim

Awesome story, @Jim Waterman ! Thank you for sharing. The responses to my purchase of this 203 switcher, I.e. members like you saying “this one is the real deal” makes me teeter closer to the edge of keeping it. I have a pre-war she’ll tender from my grandpop that, due to issues with the solonoid, I had the one coupler replaced so it’d be a good transition piece. Again, thanks for sharing, I hope I get to see my B6 run like a champ justlike you have gotten to see yours!

Due to physical limitation I broke down and replaced my Toyota Sienna train hauler with a Dodge. I was stunned to find the rear opening of the Dodge to be a bit over 4” narrower. My heavy duty Milwaukee hand truck would not fit in sideways. A bit of sawing and a few new holes solved the problem.

Steve

CDE20EA4-EFC6-45C0-AC03-07CCD8801E2E8B32F7D8-53E8-453D-81D8-43312276C7FCA8F551C7-02B3-4CF4-A5B7-4920BA88F80E

Steve "Papa" Eastman

Yorba Linda, CA

Left Coast, Home of the lunatics

Attachments

Photos (3)
Steamer posted:

not buying it Sport...fool me once shame on you...fool me twice shame on me. (Good to see you in a Mopar)

My only other Mopar was a 1973 B300 cargo van we converted to a camper. Saw most of the western national parks and Vancouver in it.

Steve

Steve "Papa" Eastman

Yorba Linda, CA

Left Coast, Home of the lunatics

Acquired some pieces recently. Maker unknown for all but the pamphlet/corcular so any help is appreciated !

first this French made passenger “station”(more like a shed or waiting area). I know it’s French, or am 95% certain, as it advertises the Chemins de Fer de L’Etat- a predecessor RR to the SNCF.

image

also picked up this piece of an old crossing gate. Like the “station” above, it’s smaller than my other pre-war o Tinplate acccessories.

image

final part of the lot is what appears to be part of a switch of track tripper

image

Then, picked up this 1919 repro Lionel circular. Pretty cool and somewhat informative about basics in prewar Lionel engines. Then after that is an unknown lamp that I bought with a Lionel #35 post war. No marks to identify a maker:

imageimageimage

Attachments

Photos (6)

Steve, your french little station is a JEP model, it has been produced during the thirties, the switch is BING. The crossing gate is certainly a french model from FV and is older than the station, but a picture of the top would be usefull to be sure.

All in all nice pieces, 

Very best, Daniel

Thanks @FRENCHTRAINS ! And thank you for confirming its a station, lol. I really like it- also my first piece of JEP!! I’ve never heard of “FV”, wish the crossing was whole- I like the detail of the base and fence better than the Ives 215( or 216 i don’t recall) crossings.

Here’s a picture of the top and underneath where there are 2 open tubes(opposite the gate portion) that would connect to the missing half, I assume

imageimage

Attachments

Photos (2)
StevefromPA posted:

Thanks @FRENCHTRAINS ! And thank you for confirming its a station, lol. I really like it- also my first piece of JEP!! I’ve never heard of “FV”, wish the crossing was whole- I like the detail of the base and fence better than the Ives 215( or 216 i don’t recall) crossings.

Here’s a picture of the top and underneath where there are 2 open tubes(opposite the gate portion) that would connect to the missing half, I assume

imageimage

That's better with your pictures. It is not FV, certainly BING with the two connecting parts. They both produced very similar crossing gates. 

The JEP station is a small Halte as you could find on secondary railways, Station is of course more prestigious.

I hope you will find some more JEP pieces, they display very well, here are some other models from the same time period.

IMG_9050

Daniel

Attachments

Photos (1)
Fatman posted:

Got a couple of well loved Hornby No.2 locos coming to live with me

They show a lot of the last 80+ years lol , but they will be loved ( and maybe cleaned and oiled a tad )

 

Good lookin’ @Fatman  !! I bid on a King George V, until I realized it wasn’t a George V, a couple of weeks ago and both of these beat the pants of that one. Both locos seem to be in great shape too-  nice finds!

jhz563 posted:

I had never seen that 1919 circular before - thank you for sharing!  Even as a reproduction, what a fascinating bit of history!

Absolutely- happy to help! Idk if everyone can read the part that says “an apology”( I barely can right now- wearing sunglasses over my glasses b/c something wrong with my eye) anyway,, the part that says “An apology” goes on to explain how sorry JLC was that the actual catalog didn’t come and how there  was nothing he could do as all the print shops in the city had gone one strike.

Also, for the first time, I read Lionel’s shots at Ives’ cast iron with the physical paper in my hand, and Lione bragging about them being the first ones with a 4 screw assembly. The sections on standard and o gauge schematics, though, have proven most helpful.

FRENCHTRAINS posted:
StevefromPA posted:

Thanks @FRENCHTRAINS ! And thank you for confirming its a station, lol. I really like it- also my first piece of JEP!! I’ve never heard of “FV”, wish the crossing was whole- I like the detail of the base and fence better than the Ives 215( or 216 i don’t recall) crossings.

Here’s a picture of the top and underneath where there are 2 open tubes(opposite the gate portion) that would connect to the missing half, I assume

imageimage

That's better with your pictures. It is not FV, certainly BING with the two connecting parts. They both produced very similar crossing gates. 

The JEP station is a small Halte as you could find on secondary railways, Station is of course more prestigious.

I hope you will find some more JEP pieces, they display very well, here are some other models from the same time period.

IMG_9050

Daniel

Daniel,

Thanks for your invaluable insight! It’s much, much appreciated! I’ve seen some of those JEP pieces online before. They made some more unique accessories and you trains than the German brands I love to operate and collect- but that’s all due to geography etc... 

Thank you, again for your help.

sincerely,

steve

I recently added these to my collection.

A very early Ives #190 standard gauge tank car. These were formerly 1 gauge cars and when Ives entered the standard gauge field in 1921 they used the same tank car. It is notable for the suspended air tank, ratchet on the brake wheel (wheel missing), long ladders, and narrow 1 gauge size couplers. The couplers on this example were changed to the wider type. In 1923 Ives changed the design to a tank on full frame style.

Next is a Bing 1 gauge beer car circa 20's-30's. 

French Hornby  O gauge Orient Express passenger cars. Only 2 cars are pictured, but I actually acquired 4. I have been trying to find these cars for some time to go behind my NORD 4-4-2. Now I need to find replacement wheel sets for the cars as zinc pest has attacked the original wheels.

Eric

TCA, LCCA, Ives Train Society

Attachments

Photos (5)
Steve "Papa" Eastman posted:

Due to physical limitation I broke down and replaced my Toyota Sienna train hauler with a Dodge. I was stunned to find the rear opening of the Dodge to be a bit over 4” narrower. My heavy duty Milwaukee hand truck would not fit in sideways. A bit of sawing and a few new holes solved the problem.

Steve

CDE20EA4-EFC6-45C0-AC03-07CCD8801E2E8B32F7D8-53E8-453D-81D8-43312276C7FCA8F551C7-02B3-4CF4-A5B7-4920BA88F80E

The Dodge now feels like it’s mine.

Steve

99F20340-F92C-4313-A672-E8D7180D1F34

Steve "Papa" Eastman

Yorba Linda, CA

Left Coast, Home of the lunatics

Attachments

Photos (1)
chug posted:

I recently added these to my collection.

A very early Ives #190 standard gauge tank car. These were formerly 1 gauge cars and when Ives entered the standard gauge field in 1921 they used the same tank car. It is notable for the suspended air tank, ratchet on the brake wheel (wheel missing), long ladders, and narrow 1 gauge size couplers. The couplers on this example were changed to the wider type. In 1923 Ives changed the design to a tank on full frame style.

Next is a Bing 1 gauge beer car circa 20's-30's. 

French Hornby  O gauge Orient Express passenger cars. Only 2 cars are pictured, but I actually acquired 4. I have been trying to find these cars for some time to go behind my NORD 4-4-2. Now I need to find replacement wheel sets for the cars as zinc pest has attacked the original wheels.

Eric

TCA, LCCA, Ives Train Society

@chug goodness gracious man, those are absolute beauts and I love that you picked up 2 different gauged cars! having a tough time picking out a favorite from your pick-ups. I love Ives & Bing equally and, should next week’s meet go well, Hornby will move up but Ives & Bing are just 2 brands I’ve come to love. Speaking of love,  I love Passenger cars, plus yours are from the famous Orient Express, so bump up there! The Ives tank with Texas oil on it is really neat too, but the Bing Beer car’s detail is great.

Why pick a favorite? Love’em all! Enjoy!

StevefromPA posted:
chug posted:

 

French Hornby  O gauge Orient Express passenger cars. Only 2 cars are pictured, but I actually acquired 4. I have been trying to find these cars for some time to go behind my NORD 4-4-2. Now I need to find replacement wheel sets for the cars as zinc pest has attacked the original wheels.

Eric

TCA, LCCA, Ives Train Society

Speaking of love,  I love Passenger cars, plus yours are from the famous Orient Express, so bump up there! 

The Hornby blue CIWL restaurant and sleeper car and the matching Nord 4-4-2 were called the "Riviera Blue Train" by Hornby. This train ("Le Train Bleu" in French) was at least as famous as the Oriënt Express in the thirties and brought rich English people for their holidays from Paris to the Cote d'Azur.  It was the first train to have the luxurious type LX sleeping car which only held 10 passengers and this train was  more luxurious then the Oriënt Express.

Regards

Fred

Regarding my recent finds, thanks to all for your kind complements! Fred you are of course correct. My mistake calling the Hornby coaches Orient Express. I should have referenced my Hornby book. I am still seeking a source for replacement wheel sets and I've had no luck searching the web. Surely someone must produce these. Any help appreciated.

I intend to sell 2 of the Blue Train cars, a sleeper, and a dining car. If interested contact me using the email address in my profile. I will be listing these on the Buy/Sell in the near future.

Eric

TCA, LCCA, Ives Train Society

 

 

 

 

 

Add Reply

Post
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
×