George S posted:
Nation Wide Lines posted:
Jim O'C posted:
George S posted:

This fascinates me a little.  Several years without a sale and a AF 3007 PA gondola sells to me. The next week another is listed on a Buy it Now sale for less. It seems I set the market. The one listed is not in as good of condition as mine, but the price is less than I paid. You will see this on both sides of the buying and selling market. There are some very fine pieces listed for sale at prices that are at the top of the market, but their condition bears the price. However, they go unsold. I'm still learning about collecting, and collecting is changing with online auctions. Yet, there is still a price you need to decide on every purchase depending on rarity and condition.

George 

they made a 3009 sand dump car but only in 4-wheel, so I think you now have all the bases covered. 

They made a 6.5 inch dump car as an 8 wheel car, it is numbered 3019.  

 

 

NWL

I think you guys are just trying to trick me with the odd American Flyer numbering schemes. 

Given the 3000 series I have collected are 9 1/2" lithographed cars, I don't think either of the dump cars could be considered part of the series. The log car is a little unusual in this set as it is the only one that is not litho, but it has the same trucks and size and is generally considered part of that series of cars. There is also a derrick car numbered in the 3000's, but it is considered part of the 3200 series cars. I still want to upgrade some of my cars, but I am pretty happy that I have one of each in pretty good condition.

George

George,

Actually, the log car has a lithographed letterboard on it, so it fits in with the other lithographed cars.  The only thing Flyer neglected to make in the 9 inch litho series is a 9-inch litho caboose.

Next up, you will have to start collecting some of the enameled 3200 series cars, such as the 3210 tank cars, which came in multiple colors.

NWL

Nation Wide Lines posted:
George S posted:
Nation Wide Lines posted:
Jim O'C posted:
George S posted:

This fascinates me a little.  Several years without a sale and a AF 3007 PA gondola sells to me. The next week another is listed on a Buy it Now sale for less. It seems I set the market. The one listed is not in as good of condition as mine, but the price is less than I paid. You will see this on both sides of the buying and selling market. There are some very fine pieces listed for sale at prices that are at the top of the market, but their condition bears the price. However, they go unsold. I'm still learning about collecting, and collecting is changing with online auctions. Yet, there is still a price you need to decide on every purchase depending on rarity and condition.

George 

they made a 3009 sand dump car but only in 4-wheel, so I think you now have all the bases covered. 

They made a 6.5 inch dump car as an 8 wheel car, it is numbered 3019.  

 

 

NWL

I think you guys are just trying to trick me with the odd American Flyer numbering schemes. 

Given the 3000 series I have collected are 9 1/2" lithographed cars, I don't think either of the dump cars could be considered part of the series. The log car is a little unusual in this set as it is the only one that is not litho, but it has the same trucks and size and is generally considered part of that series of cars. There is also a derrick car numbered in the 3000's, but it is considered part of the 3200 series cars. I still want to upgrade some of my cars, but I am pretty happy that I have one of each in pretty good condition.

George

George,

Actually, the log car has a lithographed letterboard on it, so it fits in with the other lithographed cars.  The only thing Flyer neglected to make in the 9 inch litho series is a 9-inch litho caboose.

Next up, you will have to start collecting some of the enameled 3200 series cars, such as the 3210 tank cars, which came in multiple colors.

 

NWL

Yep, I have a few of those including some custom ones. I like the dark blue. I don’t think that is original paint, correct?

George

SGMA1 posted:

jhz563-  What is it, and where did you get it?  Very cool!

 

Kirk Lindvig

Standard Gauge Module Association

www.SGMA.us

It's a tin- like a cookie or candy tin, that's looks like Big Ben. It actually comes in 4 pieces and the clock works.  I saw this piece on some other folks layouts, like Papa Eastman, and have been on the lookout for one for about 6 months. it was made for Walker's Chocolate out of London.  I can post a few more pictures later tonight.

May God Bless us all.

SGMA1 posted:

Thanks!

Here’s some more photos of the Big Ben tin. 

67601113-BEEC-4CD0-8B08-1ACFF2611C060F74E10A-6A22-4C41-9A60-77008E2F5ABD223411E0-01D0-4E01-A7BA-872F07DF2EFE

The graphics/ lithography work for a item like this are exceptional in my opinion.  The fact that it has a working clock - I hope it works, haven’t installed a new battery yet - is just amazing. (One face has a clock and the other three faces are a matching graphic. The close up is one of the static faces.)

EDIT - the clock works with a fresh battery

 

May God Bless us all.

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Been concentrating on the “make something” option lately.

C9EAC391-6588-49E7-A299-3B723AAFBED4657FA553-3AF4-4329-95CD-AA3CC942930A

More pictures later this coming weekend.

 I’m open to suggestions on the paint color.  If not gloss black, then red is my next thought.

May God Bless us all.

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Photos (2)

Well I don’t know about cool but... I made a small Hornby MO type wagon as a test to see if I can make stuff before buying more tools. It’s still a bit rough as am still waiting for some files to arrive. Hopefully will look OK once finished and painted. 

 

C8FBF6BE-7B41-46AF-9157-AFC1B3434DF6

Aim to live a simple and quiet  life! 

 

Theres no gauge like O gauge! 

 

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Photos (1)
Jamie Thompson posted:

Well I don’t know about cool but... I made a small Hornby MO type wagon as a test to see if I can make stuff before buying more tools. It’s still a bit rough as am still waiting for some files to arrive. Hopefully will look OK once finished and painted. 

 

C8FBF6BE-7B41-46AF-9157-AFC1B3434DF6

Looks great, maybe do a how to on a new post. I m sure that a lot of folks would like to try and make one

Are the folded sides soldered together after he bend or are they just made tight.

Did you use a brake to do the bending or a vice?

 

 

RonH

Don't Junk it, Make it Work!

 

RonH posted:
Jamie Thompson posted:

Well I don’t know about cool but... I made a small Hornby MO type wagon as a test to see if I can make stuff before buying more tools. It’s still a bit rough as am still waiting for some files to arrive. Hopefully will look OK once finished and painted. 

 

C8FBF6BE-7B41-46AF-9157-AFC1B3434DF6

Looks great, maybe do a how to on a new post. I m sure that a lot of folks would like to try and make one

Are the folded sides soldered together after he bend or are they just made tight.

Did you use a brake to do the bending or a vice?

 

 

Thanks RonH. 

Great Suggestion I will start a new how to thread shortly.

At this stage I have only rudimentary tools so had to make do with bending them in a vice. The sides are all folded tight and no soldering. 

I will post the plans I made aswell. 

 

Aim to live a simple and quiet  life! 

 

Theres no gauge like O gauge! 

 

I’m in the process of planning my track layout for a Lionel Standard and Prewar Tinplate O vintage table which will be 5x9. Below is what I have planned currently, 1 STD and 2 O loops. I do have STD and O switches, however that limited my “O” footprint. I thought about moving the O to a trestle loop or figure 8. I wasn’t planning on elaborate scenery, just structures, street lights, signal men and figures. Looking for any other suggestions or inspiration.

Thanks in advance.

3FD504C3-6465-4609-957F-2ACEA04C08F6 

Regards

 

Rich

TCA Member

Intracoastal Model Railroad Club Member

 

Lionel Trains’s the hobby that gets better with age!!!

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Rich Wiemann posted:

I’m in the process of planning my track layout for a Lionel Standard and Prewar Tinplate O vintage table which will be 5x9. Below is what I have planned currently, 1 STD and 2 O loops. I do have STD and O switches, however that limited my “O” footprint. I thought about moving the O to a trestle loop or figure 8. I wasn’t planning on elaborate scenery, just structures, street lights, signal men and figures. Looking for any other suggestions or inspiration.

Thanks in advance.

 

I can’t see the other side of the Hellgate bridge, but you need to be careful with the approach or the engine swing and some cars will hit the side of the bridge especially with STD 42 curves. One full track section on each side might be enough, but one and a half is better. Crossovers are fun, but might not work with all tinplate engines. 

George

Thanks George for your feedback. Yes there is a full straight on the other side of the bridge. I will keep the crossover concern you brought up in mind, since I have not used one in O gauge before.

Regards

 

Rich

TCA Member

Intracoastal Model Railroad Club Member

 

Lionel Trains’s the hobby that gets better with age!!!

Jamie Thompson posted:
RonH posted:
Jamie Thompson posted:

Well I don’t know about cool but... I made a small Hornby MO type wagon as a test to see if I can make stuff before buying more tools. It’s still a bit rough as am still waiting for some files to arrive. Hopefully will look OK once finished and painted. 

 

C8FBF6BE-7B41-46AF-9157-AFC1B3434DF6

Looks great, maybe do a how to on a new post. I m sure that a lot of folks would like to try and make one

Are the folded sides soldered together after he bend or are they just made tight.

Did you use a brake to do the bending or a vice?

 

 

Thanks RonH. 

Great Suggestion I will start a new how to thread shortly.

At this stage I have only rudimentary tools so had to make do with bending them in a vice. The sides are all folded tight and no soldering. 

I will post the plans I made aswell. 

 

If you're interested in making tin cars...you may find this link of interest...go here...

http://littleglitterhouses.com/MakingTinTrainCars

Howard Lamey

 

Rich Wiemann posted:

I’m in the process of planning my track layout for a Lionel Standard and Prewar Tinplate O vintage table which will be 5x9. Below is what I have planned currently, 1 STD and 2 O loops. I do have STD and O switches, however that limited my “O” footprint. I thought about moving the O to a trestle loop or figure 8. I wasn’t planning on elaborate scenery, just structures, street lights, signal men and figures. Looking for any other suggestions or inspiration.

Thanks in advance.

3FD504C3-6465-4609-957F-2ACEA04C08F6 

I suggest you create an elevated platform on which you run all your O gauge track.  This will ensure your O gauge trains are not hidden behind the your Standard Gauge trains and help you to create a "forced perspective" on your layout for added realism. 

I also suggest you add two switches to each side of the O gauge figure 8 and connect them with straight track.  This will allow you to reverse the direction of your O gauge trains on the figure 8 creating more variety (fun) in your operations.

Bob Nelson

Bob thanks for your insights. I will definitely plan on adding the switches to the figure eight. I had thought about making an elevated trestle line but not a full platform...interesting. That would allow for adding STD switches and a side line. Feedback on if the platform should be open for line of sight to the back side? I was thinking of placing a Lionel 101/102 bridge and ramp there opposite the Hells gate. Or cover the gap as a mountain side with portals for the standard to cross over?

Regards

 

Rich

TCA Member

Intracoastal Model Railroad Club Member

 

Lionel Trains’s the hobby that gets better with age!!!

Rich Wiemann posted:

Bob thanks for your insights. I will definitely plan on adding the switches to the figure eight. I had thought about making an elevated trestle line but not a full platform...interesting. That would allow for adding STD switches and a side line. Feedback on if the platform should be open for line of sight to the back side? I was thinking of placing a Lionel 101/102 bridge and ramp there opposite the Hells gate. Or cover the gap as a mountain side with portals for the standard to cross over?

Rich, 

For O gauge switches, I found Merkur to be the smoothest running for tinplate. Here's a discussion on them: https://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/...kur-trains-and-track

For STD gauge switches, Ross seems to be the winner. That is what the SGMA uses. I have seen them in operation at Train Fest and plan on using them on my upcoming layout.

George

‘Ski thanks for the encouragement....I enjoyed you warrenvillerailroad site, great layout and collection. Looking forward to this years Christmas display.

George thanks for the switch information.

Regards

 

Rich

TCA Member

Intracoastal Model Railroad Club Member

 

Lionel Trains’s the hobby that gets better with age!!!

JEP O gauge E-501 2-B-2 electric loco. Posed with my Marklin CS 666/13020 electric, and also a JEP steeplecab. Also included is a video of it running on Hollis Cotton's O gauge layout. I can't run it on my layout because it won't fit under the bridge due to the extra-height fixed pantographs.
The E-501 features a very attractive lithographed body. From internet sources I can see it was also made in a plainer painted version, but I'm not sure of the time periods when these two versions were produced, perhaps someone out there knows?
It has a manual reverse that is connected to a rod that extends out to a lever on each side. Perhaps this was intended to work with a trackside actuator of some kind? I notice that this feature does not appear to be on the painted version.Also the painted version has a pair of spring-loaded "button" power pickups instead of the sliding shoe found on this one.
I'm also puzzling over the 3-position lever on the roof, which makes the headlight turn on, but then it doesn't run. Will have to open it up and look at the wiring.
 
JEP E501 2-B-2 loco 4JEP E501 2-B-2 loco 5JEP E501 2-B-2 loco 2JEP E501 2-B-2 loco 3JEP E501 2-B-2 loco 6JEP E501 2-B-2 loco 7JEP E501 2-B-2 loco

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IMG_9557
John Smatlak posted:
JEP O gauge E-501 2-B-2 electric loco. Posed with my Marklin CS 666/13020 electric, and also a JEP steeplecab. Also included is a video of it running on Hollis Cotton's O gauge layout. I can't run it on my layout because it won't fit under the bridge due to the extra-height fixed pantographs.
The E-501 features a very attractive lithographed body. From internet sources I can see it was also made in a plainer painted version, but I'm not sure of the time periods when these two versions were produced, perhaps someone out there knows?
It has a manual reverse that is connected to a rod that extends out to a lever on each side. Perhaps this was intended to work with a trackside actuator of some kind? I notice that this feature does not appear to be on the painted version.Also the painted version has a pair of spring-loaded "button" power pickups instead of the sliding shoe found on this one.
I'm also puzzling over the 3-position lever on the roof, which makes the headlight turn on, but then it doesn't run. Will have to open it up and look at the wiring.
 

John, you have got a very nice first model of the 2B2 JEP loco. All my comments will do for the 2B2 and the steeple cab as they are exactly from the same time period.

The first model of the 2B2 has a very specific coupling system which has been used during a short time 1932-33, and just after replaced with the classic JEP hook and produced in 1933-34 with the same pickup sliding shoe.

Just after in 1933-34 the litho model was replaced with an all steel painted body in a light green color, not Lionel peacock but not too far, and in 1935-45 the color changed to dark green. Those two models now used the spring loaded button power pick up and has only one of those. Models of the 2B2 with two pick ups are post war. In 1938 the SNCF emerged from the previous private company railways so the stamped PO on the side of the engines became SNCF. There is also different type of motors.... All those changes where the same for the steeple cab, and they where put out of production around 1941 and not reintroduced after the second world war. Only the 2B2 survived from 1946 to 1951.

Your steeple cab with the reversing lever in the back window of the cab is from 1933-34 and is the last litho model of the series, you can find it with the old black roof or the new white-cream one of the first painted models.

The rod which extends on each side is used to reverse the loco with a special tie which clip under the track. When you push the black button on the side the flat bar goes up and catch the rod on the side of the engine. I hope i am clear.... if you want one i can send one to you. Maybe more clear with the picture....

For the lights you have to use a 6 volts 0.5 amp bulb. The lights are wired in series with the motor. The lever has two positions, on and off.

If you want to know more there is a very good book on JEP but is in french, there is no English edition.

All my best wishes, Daniel

2D2 LITHO 8

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Photos (1)
FRENCHTRAINS posted:
John Smatlak posted:
JEP O gauge E-501 2-B-2 electric loco. Posed with my Marklin CS 666/13020 electric, and also a JEP steeplecab. Also included is a video of it running on Hollis Cotton's O gauge layout. I can't run it on my layout because it won't fit under the bridge due to the extra-height fixed pantographs.
The E-501 features a very attractive lithographed body. From internet sources I can see it was also made in a plainer painted version, but I'm not sure of the time periods when these two versions were produced, perhaps someone out there knows?
It has a manual reverse that is connected to a rod that extends out to a lever on each side. Perhaps this was intended to work with a trackside actuator of some kind? I notice that this feature does not appear to be on the painted version.Also the painted version has a pair of spring-loaded "button" power pickups instead of the sliding shoe found on this one.
I'm also puzzling over the 3-position lever on the roof, which makes the headlight turn on, but then it doesn't run. Will have to open it up and look at the wiring.
 

John, you have got a very nice first model of the 2B2 JEP loco. All my comments will do for the 2B2 and the steeple cab as they are exactly from the same time period.

The first model of the 2B2 has a very specific coupling system which has been used during a short time 1932-33, and just after replaced with the classic JEP hook and produced in 1933-34 with the same pickup sliding shoe.

Just after in 1933-34 the litho model was replaced with an all steel painted body in a light green color, not Lionel peacock but not too far, and in 1935-45 the color changed to dark green. Those two models now used the spring loaded button power pick up and has only one of those. Models of the 2B2 with two pick ups are post war. In 1938 the SNCF emerged from the previous private company railways so the stamped PO on the side of the engines became SNCF. There is also different type of motors.... All those changes where the same for the steeple cab, and they where put out of production around 1941 and not reintroduced after the second world war. Only the 2B2 survived from 1946 to 1951.

Your steeple cab with the reversing lever in the back window of the cab is from 1933-34 and is the last litho model of the series, you can find it with the old black roof or the new white-cream one of the first painted models.

The rod which extends on each side is used to reverse the loco with a special tie which clip under the track. When you push the black button on the side the flat bar goes up and catch the rod on the side of the engine. I hope i am clear.... if you want one i can send one to you. Maybe more clear with the picture....

For the lights you have to use a 6 volts 0.5 amp bulb. The lights are wired in series with the motor. The lever has two positions, on and off.

If you want to know more there is a very good book on JEP but is in french, there is no English edition.

All my best wishes, Daniel

 

Daniel- thanks as always for the detailed info! 

Another recently imported French toy train in O gauge- a Louis Roussy / LR / LE Rapide SNCF BB electric. It has a cast aluminum body and one powered truck and one idler. The powered truck uses traction tires, and the side frames are simply attached to the axle ends. So far it's not a good runner; the traction tires seem a bit wide and tend to bind against the side frames. Some photos attached from cleaning it up and taking care of some broken wires inside. Additional info on when this was made would be welcome.

LR BB-0401 electric locoLR BB-0401 electric loco 2LR BB-0401 electric loco 3LR BB-0401 electric loco 4

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John Smatlak posted:

Another recently imported French toy train in O gauge- a Louis Roussy / LR / LE Rapide SNCF BB electric. It has a cast aluminum body and one powered truck and one idler. The powered truck uses traction tires, and the side frames are simply attached to the axle ends. So far it's not a good runner; the traction tires seem a bit wide and tend to bind against the side frames. Some photos attached from cleaning it up and taking care of some broken wires inside. Additional info on when this was made would be welcome

John, your french collection is on a very good way.

Le LR loco is a fine runner but on yours traction tires have been replaced, original ones don't extend outside the wheels and do not bind against the side frames. You could cut them easily I think and it will run fine. After maybe some cars to match with....

Here are some pictures of an original one, the loco has some differences with yours but the motor is basically the same.

DCP03321DCP03322DCP03323

Collecting and running trains from LR is sometime not easy as they suffer from zamack deterioration, traction tires problems may be solved as there is replacement ones in France, paint flacking is also common, and finally there is many motor variations plus AC and DC motors.

Those locos have been made from 1948 to 1954. There is two major models, the BB0401 is the one you have and a little more detailed one, the BB8105 illustrated under which has been made in the last production year only, 1955, and is less easy to find. I have each one and they are very nice running engines.

DCP03313DCP03339

All my best wishes,  Daniel

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The rarest Bing 9 1/2 "coach, „SR" Southern Railroad, was never in a catalog.

bi62160-01

Found with slight damage

bi62160-02

Model was cleaned and polished. The rust was removed. A missing door handle has been replaced the bogies re-attached and a buffer changed.

bi62160-03bi62160-04

Marked with Bing

bi62160-05

 

Arne

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FRENCHTRAINS posted:
John Smatlak posted:

Another recently imported French toy train in O gauge- a Louis Roussy / LR / LE Rapide SNCF BB electric. It has a cast aluminum body and one powered truck and one idler. The powered truck uses traction tires, and the side frames are simply attached to the axle ends. So far it's not a good runner; the traction tires seem a bit wide and tend to bind against the side frames. Some photos attached from cleaning it up and taking care of some broken wires inside. Additional info on when this was made would be welcome

John, your french collection is on a very good way.

Le LR loco is a fine runner but on yours traction tires have been replaced, original ones don't extend outside the wheels and do not bind against the side frames. You could cut them easily I think and it will run fine. After maybe some cars to match with....

Here are some pictures of an original one, the loco has some differences with yours but the motor is basically the same.

DCP03321DCP03322DCP03323

Collecting and running trains from LR is sometime not easy as they suffer from zamack deterioration, traction tires problems may be solved as there is replacement ones in France, paint flacking is also common, and finally there is many motor variations plus AC and DC motors.

Those locos have been made from 1948 to 1954. There is two major models, the BB0401 is the one you have and a little more detailed one, the BB8105 illustrated under which has been made in the last production year only, 1955, and is less easy to find. I have each one and they are very nice running engines.

 

All my best wishes,  Daniel

Daniel- thanks for the info, interesting to see the differences between the versions.  I will try to trim the traction tires and see how that works.

OK, I am not one to go crazy over track, but this is a unique item.  

Closer view

So, this switch is broken, as the tie that the switch control is on is broken off, but this pair of parts is waiting to repair the switch.

 

You might wonder what is so special about this switch, well from what I can tell, the embossed "American Flyer 08" appears on c. 1914 switches only.  I received the above switch parts with my 1914 setbox many years ago.  

The later pre-1920 switches do not have the embossed lettering on the switches.

NWL

 

 

I picked up some MTH tinplate villas with plots.  I don't think this neighborhood would be fun to live in.  Too loud with the trains going through your front yard all the time and Big Ben chiming.

Plots1Plots2

MikeH

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A recently acquired Ives 1100 steamer, 1910 version. Once again Ivestrains.org (and the trusty Greenberg guide book) has provided great info- explaining the numerous different versions between the original in 1910 and the final year of 1924. http://www.ivestrains.org/CD/O_Gauge/locomotive/electric/1100/htmlfiles/No1100_2.htm
This thing is seriously ancient- it's seen here with the incorrect tender and some Ives freight cars. Unfortunately the bell was broken off the shell long ago, perhaps someone out there has a junker 1100 shell (meaning one of the many later versions) that they are willing to part with that I could transplant a bell from? It does not run- appears to be due to broken wires in the armature windings. Some pictures are also included of the mechanism removed from the shell; only one axle is powered. Note all the little punch marks on the driven wheels- is this factory or did some one improvise to enhance traction? Ives 1100 1910 version 3Ives 1100 1910 versionIves 1100 1910 version 2Ives 1100 1910 version drive unitIves 1100 1910 version with cars

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John Smatlak posted:
Note all the little punch marks on the driven wheels- is this factory or did some one improvise to enhance traction? Ives 1100 1910 version 2

John,

I suspect that the "little punch marks" you are wondering about are actually due to arcing of the electricity running through the track to the engine, when it is powered and moving.  It appears that the center rail pick-up also has some arc marks on it.  

I know that my early c. 1918 Flyer engines arc quite a bit when running, much more than later electric engines.  

Jamie Thompson posted:
RonH posted:
Jamie Thompson posted:

Well I don’t know about cool but... I made a small Hornby MO type wagon as a test to see if I can make stuff before buying more tools. It’s still a bit rough as am still waiting for some files to arrive. Hopefully will look OK once finished and painted. 

 

C8FBF6BE-7B41-46AF-9157-AFC1B3434DF6

Looks great, maybe do a how to on a new post. I m sure that a lot of folks would like to try and make one

Are the folded sides soldered together after he bend or are they just made tight.

Did you use a brake to do the bending or a vice?

 

 

Thanks RonH. 

Great Suggestion I will start a new how to thread shortly.

At this stage I have only rudimentary tools so had to make do with bending them in a vice. The sides are all folded tight and no soldering. 

I will post the plans I made aswell. 

 

The cheapie bending brake at Harbor Freight works pretty nicely on short bends like this (at least 2 of them anyway). a more sophisticated bending brake with segmented fingers works better, and can do all four bends, but a lot more money.

Jim

Jim Waterman



 

I'm in the process of working on some diorama pictures and it occurred to me I needed to increase my selection of super-detailed figures.  Here's a sampling of some of my "new people."  The figures started life as basic painted Arttista.  I've added faces, changed the basic skin tone to highlight cheekbone structure and added a bit of diversity.

  I washed the clothing with diluted dark gray, blue, and brown enamels (the diluted enamel flows into all of the depressions in the casting and highlights the wrinkles/seams/pockets/etc in the cast figure), added belts, belt loops, belt buckles, and, for the heavy set gentleman on the left, a pocket protector complete with pen. 

DSC0591Jscred

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