Skip to main content

Hey guys,

I'm not sure if this is just something we have to deal with, but we're putting together our layout and a critical component is giving us some trouble.

I ordered this Ross 22 degree crossover directly from Ross brand new.  When we opened it up, one of the shorter end rails was sitting loose in the box, and the other rails are all able to slide very easily all the way out.  It appears to me that the little hooks that are supposed to crimp the rail securely are not tightened at all, and the result is that the end rails can slip right out if you hold the crossover upward.  Gravity just pulls everything apart.

Also, it seems like the last tie in each direction is only connected to the rest of the crossover vis this single pair of crimps on the smallest outside rail, so when that rail slipped out it brought the tie with it, and the tie just slides right off of everything else.20201120_154232

Yes, I realize that these won't be installed vertically, but it makes it VERY difficult to insert pins because the rails just want to slide all the way in and bottom out against the frog (which can't happen, since the flanges won't clear the other way).  Even when they're in place, the rails are all very "wobbly" as they sit, and I'm worried that may cause problems down the line if they continue to "walk" each time a train runs over them.

It looks like someone came through with hot glue to try to fix this (which is odd, since this was brand new from Ross) but it clearly didn't work.  Is that "standard" construction?  If it is, I'm a little surprised.  This board frequently sings the praises of Ross equipment, but gobs of hot glue visible from above and a bunch of loose rails that literally fall apart when I pick up the crossover doesn't scream "quality" to me.

Just wanted to get y'alls take before I email Ross...if this is normal for them, then I suppose I'll just deal with it and try to tighten things up myself.  If this is not normal, I'll email Ross and ask for a replacement.

Thanks!

20201120_15305820201120_153107

Attachments

Images (3)
  • 20201120_153058
  • 20201120_153107
  • 20201120_154232
Videos (1)
20201120_153134
Last edited by Jeff_the_Coaster_Guy
Original Post

Replies sorted oldest to newest

@romiller49 posted:

Contact Steve right away. That looks like it’s been used. Note the screw hole in the tie. There’s been a mistake somewhere. He will certainly make good. To answer your question, no that’s not the standard. His stuff is bullet proof.

Yeah I guess I will.  I've been fiddling with it for a while just trying to tighten it up, but the "staples" are all just sort of coming out now.

To be fair, the holes are of my own doing.  We screwed it down (without the rails that fell out) jsut to help us space and locate the rest of our layout properly.

Thanks

Jeff

It looks to me like there's no glue under the rails.  In reality, you've been done a favor and don't realize it because now you can hand lay it without the joints.

If it was me, I'd pull ALL the rails out. The stringers will hold the ties together.  Pull out the staples from ONE side of the rail space, leaving the other ones there for alignment. Get a tube of walthers goo, pliobond, or something else of a rubbery contact adhesive. You need to be using Ross track to do this. Gargraves wont do this because of the rail profile.

Lay the crossover where you want it, take the tracks you plan to put adjacent to the crossover, remove the same number of ties as exist in the crossover (pull the spikes cut the stringers where you need to and carefully pull them away from the rails), mark where the rails will meet the diamond in the crossing (could also just do it with a protractor at 22.5 deg), cut them in a straight line with a dremel and hand lay it together without the rail joints. Once it all fits the way you're happy with, apply a thin bit of whatever glue you chose to both the ties and the bottom of the rail, stick it together. That will hold it for good, but usually what I do is squirt a blob of superglue on a card, take the spikes I pulled out, dip the ends in the super glue and stuff the ties back in the holes.



If you just want to fix it.... just do the glue step as above.

Last edited by Boilermaker1

back in 2002, on my first basement layout I had Gargraves turnouts. So I was excited to obtain a Ross. I had a similar problem with a double slip switch made by the same company 22.5 degree. It was a beautiful switch but shortly after installation one or more  of the rails moved and shorts would happen. I bought it as new at a show so, I had to find a way to stabilize the movable rails. It turned out that the staples(?) used had worked their way loose. The locos would catch or move the rails that would slide through the staples. I had dabbled in O scale (2 rail) and went into my track supply box. Surgery next. I removed the offending rails and replaced several ties with a stronger wood, less porous less worked wood the original staples were useless.
I re fastened  the rails with o scale track spikes. It was a tight space but the spikes were thin and long.  This remedied the moving shorting rails. Happily the switch was rebuild using the same method.
note the switch I had was an early model production. It seemed more intricate, there wasn’t a diamond plate on mine.

best of luck with yours.

Last edited by Rich Melvin

Personally I would only bring a defect like this to  the forum after the mfg, would have walked away from it.

All suppliers have occasional problems, the key is in how they handle the problem.

Steve at Ross has an excellent product and an excellent reputation.  Running something like this unusual situation up a semi public flag pole does not do justice to the serious well earned credibility of the Ross company and specifically does not help newbys who are looking for guidance in this hobby.

For what is worth, I have used Ross products on many folk's layouts for 18 years and each and every product was excellent.

Please permit the builder to address an issue before you go public. 

I was not trying to trash Ross, sorry if I came off that way.  I've emailed Steve and will see what comes of it.  Sometimes things happen, I get it, and I'm certainly not to the point where I'd walk away from other Ross stuff.  I genuinely wanted to know of this was a normal construction method, in which case I wouldn't have bothered Ross for anything.

Y'all can delete the thread if you want. 

@Tom Tee posted:

Personally I would only bring a defect like this to  the forum after the mfg, would have walked away from it.

All suppliers have occasional problems, the key is in how they handle the problem.

Steve at Ross has an excellent product and an excellent reputation.  Running something like this unusual situation up a semi public flag pole does not do justice to the serious well earned credibility of the Ross company and specifically does not help newbys who are looking for guidance in this hobby.

For what is worth, I have used Ross products on many folk's layouts for 18 years and each and every product was excellent.

Please permit the builder to address an issue before you go public.

The best answer given.  Ross should have been the first contact.  Even asking if this is normal is strange.  It's like asking if my 4 wheel drive, missing 1 tire is normal.  Do you expect 4 wheels yep, do expect the rails to be attached yep, then it's not normal and you should first contact Ross.  The have the reputation of "Making it Right"!

We have devolved to a society, in which many of us (I am guilty of it, too) feel entitled and in which we expect instant results.  The web has provided people with the ability to speak before they think, speak without filter, and speak without the normal social graces. The computer has afforded us an immediate way to react and vent, and to take away from us the individual responsibility to be self-reliant and thoughtful.

Imagine this situation back when we communicated by the postal service.  Answer: it wouldn't have even happened. None of us would have learned about this single unfortunate event, the manufacturer would have taken care of the problem, without the potential of public embarrassment, and the customer would have, after a few weeks, been satisfied.

I'm sorry that your toy train track arrived busted. I'm sure that using good old American ingenuity, you'll get the satisfaction of analyzing the problem, and fixing it.  In the future, this low point in your life will eventually be one that you will put into perspective, and you will move on to fix bigger and more complicated problems that will erupt. Historically, playing with toy trains has helped countless generations of folks learn new skills. Here's your chance!

Last edited by Arthur P. Bloom

Not into text speak, but I did LOL reading this.  It seems you used it to lay out your track plan, you even screwed it down, understandable.  I would too, to get it done.  But if you damaged it taking the track back apart, like the rails weren’t secured so well so it all kind of fell apart, you could prob fix it easily with glue and securing the ties better.  It’s a pretty basic piece of track.  Not judging you, I actually thank you for providing a chuckle from all those who did.  I am a fan of Ross switches and track.  Quality you can depend on.  Cheers.

Last edited by William 1

Several years ago I bought some 072 left and right hand switches from Steve.  I started to lay one of them down and noticed something wasn't right, turned out the guard rails were missing.  I called RCS and talked to Steve, he wanted to replace the switch but I told him to simply drop the parts in an envelope and mail them to me and I would put them on.

Stuff happens, and in this case Steve made it right in a quick manner.  Some glue and a couple of spikes (good Lord all you railroad men, call them what they are!!!) and all was fine.

I recall a sign on the wall in an office in a Canadian motion picture (forget the title) that read: Be sure brain is in gear before engaging mouth.  I still have problems following this simple instruction.  Sounds like it should be a passage from the Bible.  I imagine there is one simular verse that can be found in the Book of Proverbs.  You know, takin' a look doesn't sound like a bad idea come to think about it.

A Healthy and Happy Thanksgiving everyone.  You're a great bunch of guys to chat with!

Last edited by Trinity River Bottoms Boomer

We have devolved to a society, in which many of us (I am guilty of it, too) feel entitled and in which we expect instant results.  The web has provided people with the ability to speak before they think, speak without filter, and speak without the normal social graces. The computer has afforded us an immediate way to react and vent, and to take away from us the individual responsibility to be self-reliant and thoughtful.

Arthur,

Your statement is right on target.  I have two program management trainees assigned to me now.  I told them they needed to learn "soft skills" to be successful program managers and the learning started "right here and now".  I used almost the same words you posted here.  The four or five Friday morning "soft skills" sessions were taken very well--I was even asked by one last week if I would present more!

I recall a sign on the wall in an office in a Canadian motion picture (forget the title) that read: Be sure brain is in gear before engaging mouth.  I still have problems following this simple instruction.  Sounds like it should be a passage from the Bible.  I imagine there is one simular verse that can be found in the Book of Proverbs.  You know, takin' a look doesn't sound like a bad idea come to think about it.

A Healthy and Happy Thanksgiving everyone.  You're a great bunch of guys to chat with!

Boomer -- I heard the same advice when I was in the military except about every third word yelled at me was, how shall we say, "quite colorful" to accentuate the "guidance".

Steve is great. I think I had him on the phone for 20 some odd minutes asking a ton of questions about his product. He answered every single one and told me the best advice at the time, "before you order, make sure you have a track plan so you can order the right stuff and see where you're going." I think I called him back a few weeks later after I had all that squared with my order.

Pat: The military yelling I remember occured during basic training.  We were treated like humans while attending the US Army Transportation Corps school at Ft. Eustus, VA.  This was Oct-Jan 64-65.  Assigned to the USATC 49th Transportation Group in Germany the same thing.  Not enough for me to decide to go for a military career though.  Rank was slow.  I made Sp/4.  Discharged in Aug 67, I returned to TX where I started a RR career with SSW, then ATSF, but that's another story.

I always thought the USAF wasn't anything like the US Army when it came to yelling though.  My dad spent 30 years in the USAF as a flyboy and never told me any stories to that effect.  Of course, he didn't want a family, so I was raised by my TX grandparents, and never really got to know him well enough to talk about any military adventures with him.

I've only heard good words when anyone brings up Ross Custom Switches.  Top Quality products.  Always Great Service.

Add Reply

Post
OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
330-757-3020

www.ogaugerr.com
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×
×