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@Richie C. posted:

Looks great....... even though it's made of metal , you still might consider some locating pins so it won't twist out of shape after repeated use.

Also, did you trial fit some pieces of Fastrack to make sure there were no clearance issues, especially on the hinge side ?

Locating pins is a hard maybe...its .125 Aluminum it will need to take a really good shot to screw it up..ya there are zero clearance issues on both sides

@Snkbittin posted:

Morning..1st I hope this is the right forum for this..had some time at work yesterday so I twisted up parts for the lift up bridge and installed it this morning..pardon the mess 4C31BA40-410F-4839-A572-B19078C2B150

Hello,

Could you please post some additional photos showing the hinge itself? 

The video is ok, but didn't show the hinge assembly and how it was mounted.

You did a great job and it is worth noting how it was done.

All .125 5052 H32 Aluminum The hinges are 2 flats and 2 angles .. the whole shelf rests on 2 angles screwed to the table ..I used hardware from the "Big Bucket" in the Garage Mahal so cost for bridge has been zero I assembled it all with it in place starting with the angle rests then the table and hinges I spaced it and clamped the hinge stuff in and drilled and tapped 1/4-20 for plates to the bridge and then I screwed the hinge angles on if you look the piviot point is up and away towards the outter upper corner ..thats so it lifts as it swings and zero bind ..I didnt use pins and probably wont as its 24" square and has zero play in left or right direction Id need to literally have to damage on purpose to get it to not line up.. When I Drilled the Hinge I did for 1/4-2 and tapped all the way thru..it will work like that but I drilled out the bridge side of the hinge just so the bolt would go thru and used Nylock nuts on all ..I could have punched out everything and made it "Perfect" like it was manufactured but I just twisted up the Bridge and the hinge angles and the shelf angles ..everything else was flat

0E14252D-67CC-4766-B9F6-D2E1FCC31720AE1E841E-D38E-4732-A0FB-A0EB2402DAE64AB276CE-26B5-4A31-AF63-8D3BA2BA5541D1D2D76A-94EE-4201-BD03-A07590757401

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Images (4)
  • 0E14252D-67CC-4766-B9F6-D2E1FCC31720
  • AE1E841E-D38E-4732-A0FB-A0EB2402DAE6
  • 4AB276CE-26B5-4A31-AF63-8D3BA2BA5541
  • D1D2D76A-94EE-4201-BD03-A07590757401
Last edited by Snkbittin
@Allegheny posted:

Hello,

Could you please post some additional photos showing the hinge itself?

The video is ok, but didn't show the hinge assembly and how it was mounted.

You did a great job and it is worth noting how it was done.

Allegheny,Thank you ..I hope the above pics help but Im more than willing to answer any questions you might still have  Dave

Snkbittin, that is one nice bridge! Beefy! You must have a brake to do such perfect bends. With 1/8th" thick aluminum and the fact that it's maybe two feet wide, you could stand on it. It will last a long time and no splinters! Please post again when you connect the Fastrack electrically, I'd like to see how you do it. Thx for the post.

Thanks! Yes Im a Fabricator..I program and run a 10' Mitsubishi Hybrid Brake ..Its very sturdy! Ive been laying out the track and hope Ill get the track on it tomorrow

Great job and thanks for sharing.  The critical point in this mechanism is the raised pivot in the hinge to prevent the track from binding when opening the unit.  I also have a lift up section and followed the design of Jim Barrett in a past article in OGR Magazine.  Showed how to make the pivot point above the level of the unit to avoid track binding.  A bit trick but it works!

Enjoy!

Michael

I used the lift up type bridge on the top level, and a swing type (like a door) on the bottom level. The hinge on the top is above the track level as stated earlier. I painted the hinge flat black like the bridge, and it kind of disappears. The hinge was from Home Depot.

IMG_0013

I used Atlas track on the bridge, and Fastrack on the rest of the layout.

Since the bridge is light, I just open it by hand and gently rest it on the track on the approach side. Some people add a counter balance or cylinder mechanism to open & close the bridge automatically.



14 Apr 10 00214 Apr 10 00414 Apr 10 005

14 Apr 10 008

I aligned the track with a simple wooden wedge that holds the ties on the bridge track in place, both vertically and horizontally. The layout track on both sides of the bridge is held in place with a screw through the tie and shimmed for the desired height.

IMG_0016

IMG_0017

I then power the track on the bridge with two wires soldered to the bridge track center and outside rail then connected to a terminal strip on the layout side of the bridge.

IMG_0012

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Images (8)
  • 14 Apr 10 002
  • 14 Apr 10 004
  • 14 Apr 10 005
  • 14 Apr 10 008
  • IMG_0012
  • IMG_0013
  • IMG_0016
  • IMG_0017

Great job and thanks for sharing.  The critical point in this mechanism is the raised pivot in the hinge to prevent the track from binding when opening the unit.  I also have a lift up section and followed the design of Jim Barrett in a past article in OGR Magazine.  Showed how to make the pivot point above the level of the unit to avoid track binding.  A bit trick but it works!

Enjoy!

Michael

Thank you! .. works perfect

@Joe K posted:

I used the lift up type bridge on the top level, and a swing type (like a door) on the bottom level. The hinge on the top is above the track level as stated earlier. I painted the hinge flat black like the bridge, and it kind of disappears. The hinge was from Home Depot.

IMG_0013

I used Atlas track on the bridge, and Fastrack on the rest of the layout.

Since the bridge is light, I just open it by hand and gently rest it on the track on the approach side. Some people add a counter balance or cylinder mechanism to open & close the bridge automatically.



14 Apr 10 00214 Apr 10 00414 Apr 10 005

14 Apr 10 008

I aligned the track with a simple wooden wedge that holds the ties on the bridge track in place, both vertically and horizontally. The layout track on both sides of the bridge is held in place with a screw through the tie and shimmed for the desired height.

IMG_0016

IMG_0017

I then power the track on the bridge with two wires soldered to the bridge track center and outside rail then connected to a terminal strip on the layout side of the bridge.

IMG_0012

Nice!! Great pics

@Joe K posted:

I used the lift up type bridge on the top level, and a swing type (like a door) on the bottom level. The hinge on the top is above the track level as stated earlier. I painted the hinge flat black like the bridge, and it kind of disappears. The hinge was from Home Depot.

I used the same Home Depot hinges on my bridge.  They are heavy duty so they handle the load well and don't shift.  I like how you hide them so you see very little of them from the top down.  Mine are exposed but I will finish them with flat black paint so they look part of the bridge.  I also like your wedges you made for the other end.  Great idea.  I just cut a chunk out of the foam and 1/2 plywood table top to fit.  But I'm going to try the wedges on my 2nd level bridge and a lift out I already installed on another part of my layout. bridge1bridge2bridge3

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Images (3)
  • bridge1
  • bridge2
  • bridge3

Heres some more on the Bridge..While i was perfectly happy to lift up and down manually I made the mistake of telling my 3.5 yr old Grandson while I was installing it the "Maybe Papa will put a motor and a Button "..last week he was trying to lift it and stopped and turned to me and asked wheres the button Papa??..Sooooo Linear actuator with control and a remote has been installed ..this vid is from earlier today Ive since cleaned up wiring and re arranged the mounts so its just hit the button and it goes up and hit it and goes down

Attachments

Videos (1)
239D41BE-937A-4FB9-A04D-0FB3412D1431

Two layouts ago and 2,600 miles away in PA, I designed a lift out bridge with two interesting features.

First, the bridge was held in place with cabinet latch magnets which were wired at one end for power to the center rail and outside rail power at the other end. You can see the wire soldered to the magnet housing in one of the pictures. The other end (metal plate to which the magnet attaches) is soldered to and wired to the bridge track.

Second: I protected the approach tracks with normally open push buttons at each end which cut power if the bridge was out.

To stabilize the bridge, brackets were attached to each side:

IMG_6126IMG_6127IMG_6129

Attachments

Images (3)
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  • IMG_6127
  • IMG_6129
@stangtrain posted:

Two layouts ago and 2,600 miles away in PA, I designed a lift out bridge with two interesting features.

First, the bridge was held in place with cabinet latch magnets which were wired at one end for power to the center rail and outside rail power at the other end. You can see the wire soldered to the magnet housing in one of the pictures. The other end (metal plate to which the magnet attaches) is soldered to and wired to the bridge track.

Second: I protected the approach tracks with normally open push buttons at each end which cut power if the bridge was out.

To stabilize the bridge, brackets were attached to each side:

IMG_6126IMG_6127IMG_6129

Hi Stangtrain, that's a very cool bridge! The safety switches are a heads up idea. Oh man, without the switches if you did forgot and ran that Big Boy off the layout, that would be painful. Speaking of Big Boy, I can't tell from the photo, but is it LionMaster or Scale? Nice work!!!

@stangtrain posted:

Two layouts ago and 2,600 miles away in PA, I designed a lift out bridge with two interesting features.

First, the bridge was held in place with cabinet latch magnets which were wired at one end for power to the center rail and outside rail power at the other end. You can see the wire soldered to the magnet housing in one of the pictures. The other end (metal plate to which the magnet attaches) is soldered to and wired to the bridge track.

Second: I protected the approach tracks with normally open push buttons at each end which cut power if the bridge was out.

To stabilize the bridge, brackets were attached to each side:

IMG_6126IMG_6127IMG_6129

Very slick! Thanks for sharing

@breezinup posted:

By the way, Snkbitten, that's a nice print of the Arado Ar234. Where did you get that?

It’s part of a set that focuses on unit markings  that where unique  .. the Artist was named Dennis Davidson and I’ve had it for yrs now ..I have that and TA-152 and FW-190D 9 I’m a big fan of WW2 aviation with a strong leaning to German machine s

Last edited by Snkbittin
@stangtrain posted:

First, the bridge was held in place with cabinet latch magnets which were wired at one end for power to the center rail and outside rail power at the other end. You can see the wire soldered to the magnet housing in one of the pictures. The other end (metal plate to which the magnet attaches) is soldered to and wired to the bridge track.



That cabinet latch magnet system is slick.  At first, I thought, "How do you connect the outside rail?", but then I realized you said you used another cabinet latch magnet on other end for the outside rail -- so they are off set.  Brilliant.  I'm going to try that on my lift outs.  I currently have a lift out  that's wired just on one end and my lift out sits below, tethered by the wires.  But this eliminates the wiring entirely and allows you to set the lift out anywhere.  Thanks for sharing this!

Mike

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