Tinplate Art posted:

I temember a specific protect engine once spotted on a leg of that WYE and it was a seemingly unattended K4! My friend and I wisely resisted the temptation to climb into the cab!

At this remove, do you still think it was "wise" not to have had a look into the cab? Actually, if it had been me, I would have resisted, too!

MELGAR

Does anyone have any photographic evidence of locomotive #624 having run on the LIRR? This is a K-Line model - I believe of an EMD F10. An engine with the same paint scheme, #413, ran on the Metro-North New Haven Division.

MELGAR

MELGAR_LIRR_EMD_F10_624_02

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Tinplate Art posted:

My favorite terminals on the LIRR were Flatbush Ave in Brooklyn, Hempstead, Rockaway and Penn Station. Unfortunately, I never made it to Oyster Bay, Port Jefferson or Montauk. 

Mine were Merrick, Hempstead and Penn Station. But who can forget Jamaica? More recently, I get to Port Jefferson and Mineola. And I used to see LIRR trains in Bethpage during the years I worked at Grumman.

MELGAR

MELGAR: Did you by any chance work with Nick DeMaio or Vinnie Mietta at Grumman? Vinnie was a next door neighbor when we lived in Woodhaven, Queens, and Nick was my uncle. Vinnie worked on the LEM. My cousin, Arlene Brigandi, also worked for Grumman. Small world!

vita sine litteris mors est  (Seneca)

Tinplate Art posted:

MELGAR: Did you by any chance work with Nick DeMaio or Vinnie Mietta at Grumman? Vinnie was a next door neighbor when we lived in Woodhaven, Queens, and Nick was my uncle. Vinnie worked on the LEM. My cousin, Arlene Brigandi, also worked for Grumman. Small world!

I worked on the airplane side of the house - not spacecraft... Did not know them but it was a great company and largest employer on Long Island.

MELGAR

Doing some cursory research yielded NO information on the existence of a turntable or passing siding. Guess they ran backwards with a conductor on the rear with a brake valve/whistle to Port Jefferson, where the engine could be properly turned!

vita sine litteris mors est  (Seneca)

This is a pic looking eastbound on Atlantic Avenue in Woodhaven, Queens. Taken a few months before the tracks were moved underground. You can see in the lower left, the Union Course Station which was named for the horse racing track that was there in the late 1800's. In the upper right you can see the clock tower of the Lalance Grosjean Factory. The clock tower is still there today. One of the few remnants of the old factory. Being from Woodhaven, this is one of my favorite LIRR pics.

(Not my photo. Credit to the photographer)

Bruce

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WOW! I lived at 92-08 92nd Street from 1950-1961, just up the street from the Lalance and Grosjean factory. I remember on one occasion a worker had an accident which chopped off one or both hands! There was also a Canada Dry bottling plant just a little further up Atlantic Ave about a block from Woodhaven Blvd, and we kids would sometimes go up to one of the windows and get a free soda right off the line. Though not cold, it was still a treat! When I started Adelphi College in 1960, I would catch the LIRR train to Jamaica at the Atlantic Ave station and ride to the Nassau Blvd station in Garden City. From there, it was a short walk to the campus. Ah, memories!

vita sine litteris mors est  (Seneca)

The classic jazz age novel, The Great Gatsby, contains several LIRR references, which I always enjoyed. The fictional East Egg and West Egg were meant to represent the actual Great Neck and the Port Washington Peninsula respectively on Long Island. For a brief period, Scott and Zelda resided in Great Neck.

vita sine litteris mors est  (Seneca)

MELGAR posted:

Does anyone have any photographic evidence of locomotive #624 having run on the LIRR? This is a K-Line model - I believe of an EMD F10. An engine with the same paint scheme, #413, ran on the Metro-North New Haven Division.

MELGAR

MELGAR_LIRR_EMD_F10_624_02

Mel, I could swear I do, but I’ll dig around. You have me interested.

Andy

Since reading Ron Zeil's "Steel Rails to The Sunrise" many years ago, I have become fascinated with the Golden's Pickle Works where the LIRR wreck took place. I have been looking for pictures of Golden's before the train wreck to see what it looked like. Do any of you Long Islander's have a picture of Golden's before the wreck?

Golden's Pickle Works

I believe this picture is after the train hit the building.

Bobby Ogage

"I hear that train a coming,

it's Long Island No. 39 rolling

around the bend"

 

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The trip under Atlantic Ave was always interesting when the train emerged from the tunnel onto the brief section of elevated track, and if I recall correctly, a station. Then the tracks once again dove underground to the Atlantic Terminal on Flatbush Ave.

vita sine litteris mors est  (Seneca)

Steamfan77 posted:

A few pictures passing through Jamaica today...

Andy

B482520D-C0EB-4A7A-8BFF-6C235C1F1AED

Nice pics, Steamfan... thanks for sharing. Do you have any idea of what the car on the right in this one pic is??? Looks like it’s sporting long horns!!!

Paul

Techno-Peasant of the First Order

Provisionary Member - Brotherhood of the Crappy Basement Layout

 TCA 15-70689

LCCA RM-39621

LOTS RM-9326

To all,

I asked Steve Lynch from the Trainsarefun website about the “Longhorns “ pictured above, and here was the reply:

 

 M3 ex-9775 converted to  #E775 alcohol/sandite car 2018. Photo/Archive: Jeff Erlitz


The LIRR currently uses two M-1 cars to "slime" the rails during falling leaf season. Modified M1's 9401 & 9591 (now E401 & 591) are utilized sandwiched between a pair of MP15's.They operate entirely at night and are serviced at Richmond Hill during the day.

There are also leaf crusher trains. These consist of two MP15's and gravel hoppers. They crush the leaves on the Oyster Bay , Pt. Jeff, Montauk, and Greenport branches. These trains are based at KO and Wellwood siding and operate at night."  

Both sandites and leaf crushers have run on the branch simultaneously, and have been on the branch with both. Leaf crushers are operated on the branch to pulverize leaves that may be wedged in the circuits for the crossing gates. If leaves are not crushed, the potential for leaves to impede a circuit and crossing gates to stay up while a train goes through a crossing increases. All leaf crushers are run at the direction of the train dispatcher.Information courtesy: Ben Jankowski, Oyster Bay RR Museum

 Steve 

 

Paul, I hope that gives a little background. I learned something new too!

Andy

 

 

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Great pix Andy. Thanks for the added info about the longhorns.

Paul- I saw the Newsday article about the M-9's last week. Long over due for deployment.

I remember reading a few years back that the LIRR was looking for new diesel/ electrics to supplement the dual-mode EMD's. Anyone know more?

Bob

Three Rails Are Better Than None 

I don't know, but my grandmother used to take me with a bowl of popcorn to the Valley Stream station to wave at the engineers in the mid 1960's. Then we would go to what I recall as the Borden's bottling plant.

Steamfan77 posted:

To all,

I asked Steve Lynch from the Trainsarefun website about the “Longhorns “ pictured above, and here was the reply:

 

 M3 ex-9775 converted to  #E775 alcohol/sandite car 2018. Photo/Archive: Jeff Erlitz


The LIRR currently uses two M-1 cars to "slime" the rails during falling leaf season. Modified M1's 9401 & 9591 (now E401 & 591) are utilized sandwiched between a pair of MP15's.They operate entirely at night and are serviced at Richmond Hill during the day.

There are also leaf crusher trains. These consist of two MP15's and gravel hoppers. They crush the leaves on the Oyster Bay , Pt. Jeff, Montauk, and Greenport branches. These trains are based at KO and Wellwood siding and operate at night."  

Both sandites and leaf crushers have run on the branch simultaneously, and have been on the branch with both. Leaf crushers are operated on the branch to pulverize leaves that may be wedged in the circuits for the crossing gates. If leaves are not crushed, the potential for leaves to impede a circuit and crossing gates to stay up while a train goes through a crossing increases. All leaf crushers are run at the direction of the train dispatcher.Information courtesy: Ben Jankowski, Oyster Bay RR Museum

 Steve 

 

Paul, I hope that gives a little background. I learned something new too!

Andy

 

 

Thanks, Andy (and Steve). The last few years I was commuting, I road Metro North quite a bit and fondly remember “flat wheel season”   My favorite incident was when we were pulling into the Valhalla stop and the train slid completely through and out of the station. It had to back in and they had to send out a diesel with sanding capability to go ahead of our train (I believe it was a set of M7’s). Ahhhh commuting!!!

Paul

Techno-Peasant of the First Order

Provisionary Member - Brotherhood of the Crappy Basement Layout

 TCA 15-70689

LCCA RM-39621

LOTS RM-9326

RSJB18 posted:
Todds Architectural Models posted:

I don't know, but my grandmother used to take me with a bowl of popcorn to the Valley Stream station to wave at the engineers in the mid 1960's. Then we would go to what I recall as the Borden's bottling plant.

https://forgotten-ny.com/2006/...dairies-around-town/

Wow Bob... thanks for that link. When I was a kid we had Renken’s milk delivered in glass bottles. We had a metal insulated box on the front stoop (yes... in Brooklyn, it was a stoop!!!). Can you imagine anyone today using milk that was left in an unlocked box on your stoop???

Paul

Techno-Peasant of the First Order

Provisionary Member - Brotherhood of the Crappy Basement Layout

 TCA 15-70689

LCCA RM-39621

LOTS RM-9326

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