I rode the LIRR growing up on Long Island and it has always been an impressive railroad to me. It is one of the oldest railroads in the United States that still operates under its original charter from 1834. 66 years of operation as an independent railroad, 66 years under PRR ownership, and owned by the State of New York since 1966.

MELGAR

I had a relative who was a conductor on the LIRR. He took me to work with him one day in the summer of 1980, when I was 13 years old. I had a BLAST riding trains all day, with a GP on one end, and an FA on the other, push-pull fashion. Got to ride in the vestibules. Even was aboard when some punk kids put a lawn mower on the track and we ran over it, breaking the train line and going into emergency!

Steve

 

Ah, the GREAT LIRR! Rode the electric MU's to Rockaway Beach with my parents as a young child (1945-48), and to my grandfather's house in Hicksville behind those marvelous G5's. We would take the Atlantic Ave. Line from Brooklyn to Jamaica, and I still vividly remember the heat from the boiler of that G5 as it pulled into Jamaica Station. Later, in my college years, I rode the Atlantic Avenue line from Woodhaven to Jamaica, and then to the Nassau Blvd. station in Garden City, for a short walk to Adelphi College. Once I walked from the campus to the Mineola station to catch the train for a short ride to Hicksville to spend the weekend with my cousins. After having moved to Hicksville in 1962, I frequently took the train into Penn Station with the change at Jamaica to the electric MU's. The ride through Sunnyside Yard before plunging into the East River tunnel was a  always a special treat with those GG1's and DD1's and the  huge passenger car marshalling yard! I well remember ALCO RS1's and the FM C-Liners, after steam had been phased out. As a child growing up in Woodhaven, Queens in the 1950's, my friend and I occasionally rode our bikes out to the Morris Park engine terminal, where the old coaling tower still stood in the early diesel years. Wonderful memories of a GREAT railroad!

vita sine litteris mors est  (Seneca)

Tinplate Art posted:

Ah, the GREAT LIRR! ...

...Wonderful memories of a GREAT railroad!

Art,

It certainly was great. My favorite was riding the double-decker passenger cars from Merrick through Jamaica, past Sunnyside Yards to New York Penn Station. Even today, standing alongside the tracks during commuter rush hours is a thrill. The frequency of twelve-car commuter trains is impressive. Hundreds of people waiting to board. There are still crossings at grade in Mineola. The only G5s I can photograph today shown below.

MELGAR

MELGAR_LIRR_G5S_21_06MELGAR_LIRR_G5S_21_09

 

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Kelly Anderson posted:
MELGAR posted:

I rode the LIRR growing up on Long Island and it has always been an impressive railroad to me. It is one of the oldest railroads in the United States that still operates under its original charter from 1834. 

HELLO!!  The Strasburg Rail Road is still operating under its original charter from 1832!!!  And has never been a subsidiary of another railroad either!!!!

Sorry. I stand corrected and have revised my post. However, as much as I like and truly admire today's Strasburg Rail Road, the LIRR moves a far greater number of people. I do wish the Strasburg all the best.

MELGAR

I grew up in Mineola, with the Oyster Bay Branch running past the little league field, my grammar school, over Jericho Turnpike, and had a spur run to what was then Latham Bros. Lumber. I was born after steam stopped running, but the 4-6-0 G5s is one of my favorite engines. And I only run Long Island motive power and passenger cars. Dan lives on my layout too! 

Andy

814AE9D2-4C03-47F3-9384-E330F68AFC8CD7A1EE6E-381C-4A56-B9E7-AE8D249BC3B79B648352-825F-4E6B-B367-60D6D4739EB0C3EBE4E6-F547-4100-8B2D-BBF93EBA254679E480C0-36F1-421A-9B4D-8F36DE1377AB12657B11-AA37-4C89-B158-AEABDE8F4F707D9F38F8-1F32-4C9B-8869-AC69C472E0D2441E2380-3AF9-477E-9A45-BC1DE4D8CDF76F213DF9-2412-4AB6-9F2B-AF2751C98900E76A7609-2B32-4741-B1AF-8BE8D0192F838E08E464-10E9-4645-8293-6F0DC22A5A3EE4E0F980-08EE-4B23-82EA-CD77940CDFCF

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From 1946 to 1965, I lived just up Tyson Avenue (AKA 260 St) from the LIRR crossing at Tulip Avenue in Floral Park. So I had the great experience of knowing the LIRR in its steam era, and very fortunate to get a round trip cab ride is G5s No. 34 from Floral Park to Oyster Bay.

My teenage friends & I drank beer siting on the tracks of the Creedmore Branch, at what was once was the site of the Central Railroad's East Hinsdale Station. I still remember the LIRR's coal trains to Creedmore on the branch that ran through the backyards of homes in Bellrose and Queens Village.

On my walk to Our Lady of Victory School in Floral Park Village, I would take the underpass walkway at the LIRR's Tulip Avenue Crossing. As I recall, there were 3 tracks at the crossing and the Hempstead Branch cut-in just to the east of Tulip Avenue. The Hempstead Branch was also originally a part of the Central Railroad.

Central-RR-crossing-LIRR_no-connection-Stewart JctFirst-interlocking_Floral-Park_10-1887floral9d13f2b2b62a5a0d93870b4dbf500dc2

Bobby Ogage

"I hear that train a coming,

it's Long Island No. 39 rolling

around the bend"

 

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Great thread. The never ending love/ hate of the LIRR.

Adelphi University held classes for several years on metro NY commuter trains, including the LIRR. This was one of our former professors, Greg Gutman, founder of the program, teaching aboard a train.

 

 

 

 

2017-06-03 07.30.592017-06-03 07.31.1020171014_083017

 

Three Rails Are Better Than None 

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Back in the early 60s in Suffolk County, I decided to play hooky on occasion and spent all day at the Oakdale station.  I was friends with the station master, a Grandfather type'.  I used to to help him with small maintenance jobs in maintaining the station.  Then wait for the PM trains returning from the city. The motive power was mostly RS-3 if I recall correctly, and they were all in pristine condition...

 Image result for lirr oakdale 

  Ted 

 

Thank you Mel and Art. Jon, that’s very cool. I used to love going there with my father. I was fascinated by how the tracks came up into the lumber shed. Bob, that is a great story. How long were those classes given?  Nice rolling stock all who have posted. I’ve learned a great deal as I’ve researched LIRR history, and specifically the Oyster Bay Branch. All great memories and stories. I’d like to keep this thread going too. 

Andy 

Another gem from my Facebook feed... some 1891 propaganda!!!

0F5B4185-2DF2-45AC-A570-4895F3F93A90

My former work colleagues would, I’m sure, take exception to the tag line “Frequent and Fast Trains to all points. cheap Fares”  

Paul

Techno-Peasant of the First Order

Provisionary Member - Brotherhood of the Crappy Basement Layout

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Steamfan77 posted:

Thank you Mel and Art. Jon, that’s very cool. I used to love going there with my father. I was fascinated by how the tracks came up into the lumber shed. Bob, that is a great story. How long were those classes given?  Nice rolling stock all who have posted. I’ve learned a great deal as I’ve researched LIRR history, and specifically the Oyster Bay Branch. All great memories and stories. I’d like to keep this thread going too. 

Andy 

I'm not exactly sure Andy but it was a successful program while it ran. I knew Prof Gutman and he was a great guy. He passed away too early in 2004 unfortunately.

I posted this over on FEF yesterday too.

And a bunch more on SWSat today

Bob

Three Rails Are Better Than None 

Continuing on the subject of the Long Island Rail Road:

Beginning in 1910, 33 pairs of PRR boxcab electric DD1 locomotives moved trains from Manhattan Transfer (New Jersey) into New York Penn Station and through the East River tunnels to Sunnyside Yard. In 1924, most of the DD1s were transferred to the LIRR and hauled empty passenger trains from Penn Station to Sunnyside Yard. They ran on 650-volt DC third rail. Each pair weighed 313,000 pounds, developed 55,500 pounds tractive effort and had a rating of 1,580 horsepower (continuous) at 58 miles-per-hour. The LIRR scrapped most of its DD1s between 1949 and 1951 with two pairs remaining in 1962. The last pair was donated to the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania in 1978.

Pictured below, on the trestle of my 10’-by-5’ layout, which does not look at all like Sunnyside Yard, is my MTH Premier model of LIRR DD1 electric locomotive #352 (20-5516-1) with PS-2, purchased about 2002.

MELGAR

MELGAR_LIRR_DD1_352_02MELGAR_LIRR_DD1_352_04

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Thanks to @prrhorseshoecurve for starting this thread.

Let's keep it going. As one of the oldest RR's in the US, constant maintenance and improvements are required to keep it going. For many of us who use the LIRR on a regular basis this can be a double edged sword, often leading to delays, cancelled trains, use of buses around track closures, etc.

The LIRR is in the midst of two MAJOR improvement projects at the present time. The one that grabs the headlines is the East Side Access to Grand Central Terminal. This project still has several years to go and is billions over budget. Unfortunately most of the work is beyond view of the public from Sunnyside Yards under the East River and into GCT.

The second is called the "Third Track Project". This one will add a third track to the existing two on the LIRR Main line from Floral Park to Hicksville. This section of the ROW carries hundreds of daily trains and moves several hundred thousand commuters on the Main Line, Hempstead, Oyster Bay, Ronkonkoma and Port Jefferson Branches to and from points west including Jamaica Station and NY Penn Station. This section of track runs through the heart of Nassau County and through all three townships, Hempstead, North Hempstead, and Oyster Bay. The project was met with resistance initially from local politicians and residents but the RR did a good job of working with the community to get the issues resolved and approve the final plans. The unique part of this project is that all of the ROW runs through commercial and residential neighborhoods and is readily accessible and easy to find spots to watch the progress. The project will eliminate 7 grade crossings, upgrade several bridges, upgrade stations along the way and add parking. Major construction started late last year and some significant things are already underway.

So since I live right near Mineola, I will try and post some photos of the progress regularly. Any one else who lives in the area please feel free to add posts. Today I was going through Carle Place and saw the early stages of the Cherry Lane bridge replacement. They are building the new three-track bridge to the north and will slide it into place in June.

Here's the project web site. Enjoy.

Bob

2019-04-28 13.10.442019-04-28 13.10.492019-04-28 13.12.23

 

Three Rails Are Better Than None 

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From age 2 (1946) until 22 I resided in Suffolk, County, LI.  First in Lake Ronkonkoma, then Blue Point, and lastly Brookhaven.  All 3 towns at one point had LIRR stations.  My affinity for locomotives with keystone number plates and Belpaire boilers can be traced to the LIRR.  On summer Sundays the LIRR would have several G5's  "hot" for late afternoon/early evening runs back to the city from Ronkonkoma, NY .  After Catechism class I sometimes would ask dad to take me to the ready tracks that lead off a Y just west of the Ronkonkoma station.  On more than one occasion the duty hostler invited me up into the cab of a G5.  At 6 years old the sights, sound and smell of active steam locomotives were impressions indelibly formed in my young mind.  My last sight of an active Long Island steam locomotive was very brief.  One afternoon (I believe 1954) I was playing Little League baseball on a field next to LIRR tracks in Blue Point NY.  Standing in the outfield I heard the whistle of a steamer running light westbound toward the city.  The smoke  (and smell)  floated over the field.  I'm glad no one hit a ball my way as my focus was not on the game. 

Ed Rappe           PRRT&HS 421

My grandfather's house in Hicksville was located at the intersection of Bay Avenue and Woodbury Road, just across from the LIRR grade crossing on the Port Jefferson branch. There used to also be a WYE between the Port Jefferson Branch and the Montauk Branch, and I well remember the occasional "protect" steamer (K4 or G5) .spotted on that WYE in the late steam years to help a potentiallly disabled diesel train. The main diesels on that Port Jefferson branch grade crossing were FM C-Liners.

vita sine litteris mors est  (Seneca)

I will relate a humorous story involving those C-Liners blowing for that grade crossing. I had acquired a very nice Webcor Coronet reel to teel tape recorder at age 16 in 1958, and me and my mischievous cousin, Tommy, decided to record one of those engines, and then we would play it back loud to annoy my Aunt Tillie, who would often cuss when those trains blew for that crossing! (We called my grandfather's third wife aunt instead of grandma.) After playing that recording repeatedly for several minutes, we were finally discovered, and were fussed out accordingly, but some of the adults got a kick out of it! That Webcor unit had a pretty good amp and three speakers, so the recording was LOUD, with the volume turned up. It was quite a hoot (pardon the pun!).

vita sine litteris mors est  (Seneca)

Tinplate Art posted:

I temember a specific protect engine once spotted on a leg of that WYE and it was a seemingly unattended K4! My friend and I wisely resisted the temptation to climb into the cab!

At this remove, do you still think it was "wise" not to have had a look into the cab? Actually, if it had been me, I would have resisted, too!

MELGAR

Does anyone have any photographic evidence of locomotive #624 having run on the LIRR? This is a K-Line model - I believe of an EMD F10. An engine with the same paint scheme, #413, ran on the Metro-North New Haven Division.

MELGAR

MELGAR_LIRR_EMD_F10_624_02

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Tinplate Art posted:

My favorite terminals on the LIRR were Flatbush Ave in Brooklyn, Hempstead, Rockaway and Penn Station. Unfortunately, I never made it to Oyster Bay, Port Jefferson or Montauk. 

Mine were Merrick, Hempstead and Penn Station. But who can forget Jamaica? More recently, I get to Port Jefferson and Mineola. And I used to see LIRR trains in Bethpage during the years I worked at Grumman.

MELGAR

MELGAR: Did you by any chance work with Nick DeMaio or Vinnie Mietta at Grumman? Vinnie was a next door neighbor when we lived in Woodhaven, Queens, and Nick was my uncle. Vinnie worked on the LEM. My cousin, Arlene Brigandi, also worked for Grumman. Small world!

vita sine litteris mors est  (Seneca)

Tinplate Art posted:

MELGAR: Did you by any chance work with Nick DeMaio or Vinnie Mietta at Grumman? Vinnie was a next door neighbor when we lived in Woodhaven, Queens, and Nick was my uncle. Vinnie worked on the LEM. My cousin, Arlene Brigandi, also worked for Grumman. Small world!

I worked on the airplane side of the house - not spacecraft... Did not know them but it was a great company and largest employer on Long Island.

MELGAR

Doing some cursory research yielded NO information on the existence of a turntable or passing siding. Guess they ran backwards with a conductor on the rear with a brake valve/whistle to Port Jefferson, where the engine could be properly turned!

vita sine litteris mors est  (Seneca)

This is a pic looking eastbound on Atlantic Avenue in Woodhaven, Queens. Taken a few months before the tracks were moved underground. You can see in the lower left, the Union Course Station which was named for the horse racing track that was there in the late 1800's. In the upper right you can see the clock tower of the Lalance Grosjean Factory. The clock tower is still there today. One of the few remnants of the old factory. Being from Woodhaven, this is one of my favorite LIRR pics.

(Not my photo. Credit to the photographer)

Bruce

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WOW! I lived at 92-08 92nd Street from 1950-1961, just up the street from the Lalance and Grosjean factory. I remember on one occasion a worker had an accident which chopped off one or both hands! There was also a Canada Dry bottling plant just a little further up Atlantic Ave about a block from Woodhaven Blvd, and we kids would sometimes go up to one of the windows and get a free soda right off the line. Though not cold, it was still a treat! When I started Adelphi College in 1960, I would catch the LIRR train to Jamaica at the Atlantic Ave station and ride to the Nassau Blvd station in Garden City. From there, it was a short walk to the campus. Ah, memories!

vita sine litteris mors est  (Seneca)

The classic jazz age novel, The Great Gatsby, contains several LIRR references, which I always enjoyed. The fictional East Egg and West Egg were meant to represent the actual Great Neck and the Port Washington Peninsula respectively on Long Island. For a brief period, Scott and Zelda resided in Great Neck.

vita sine litteris mors est  (Seneca)

MELGAR posted:

Does anyone have any photographic evidence of locomotive #624 having run on the LIRR? This is a K-Line model - I believe of an EMD F10. An engine with the same paint scheme, #413, ran on the Metro-North New Haven Division.

MELGAR

MELGAR_LIRR_EMD_F10_624_02

Mel, I could swear I do, but I’ll dig around. You have me interested.

Andy

Since reading Ron Zeil's "Steel Rails to The Sunrise" many years ago, I have become fascinated with the Golden's Pickle Works where the LIRR wreck took place. I have been looking for pictures of Golden's before the train wreck to see what it looked like. Do any of you Long Islander's have a picture of Golden's before the wreck?

Golden's Pickle Works

I believe this picture is after the train hit the building.

Bobby Ogage

"I hear that train a coming,

it's Long Island No. 39 rolling

around the bend"

 

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The trip under Atlantic Ave was always interesting when the train emerged from the tunnel onto the brief section of elevated track, and if I recall correctly, a station. Then the tracks once again dove underground to the Atlantic Terminal on Flatbush Ave.

vita sine litteris mors est  (Seneca)

Steamfan77 posted:

A few pictures passing through Jamaica today...

Andy

B482520D-C0EB-4A7A-8BFF-6C235C1F1AED

Nice pics, Steamfan... thanks for sharing. Do you have any idea of what the car on the right in this one pic is??? Looks like it’s sporting long horns!!!

Paul

Techno-Peasant of the First Order

Provisionary Member - Brotherhood of the Crappy Basement Layout

 TCA 15-70689

LCCA RM-39621

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To all,

I asked Steve Lynch from the Trainsarefun website about the “Longhorns “ pictured above, and here was the reply:

 

 M3 ex-9775 converted to  #E775 alcohol/sandite car 2018. Photo/Archive: Jeff Erlitz


The LIRR currently uses two M-1 cars to "slime" the rails during falling leaf season. Modified M1's 9401 & 9591 (now E401 & 591) are utilized sandwiched between a pair of MP15's.They operate entirely at night and are serviced at Richmond Hill during the day.

There are also leaf crusher trains. These consist of two MP15's and gravel hoppers. They crush the leaves on the Oyster Bay , Pt. Jeff, Montauk, and Greenport branches. These trains are based at KO and Wellwood siding and operate at night."  

Both sandites and leaf crushers have run on the branch simultaneously, and have been on the branch with both. Leaf crushers are operated on the branch to pulverize leaves that may be wedged in the circuits for the crossing gates. If leaves are not crushed, the potential for leaves to impede a circuit and crossing gates to stay up while a train goes through a crossing increases. All leaf crushers are run at the direction of the train dispatcher.Information courtesy: Ben Jankowski, Oyster Bay RR Museum

 Steve 

 

Paul, I hope that gives a little background. I learned something new too!

Andy

 

 

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Great pix Andy. Thanks for the added info about the longhorns.

Paul- I saw the Newsday article about the M-9's last week. Long over due for deployment.

I remember reading a few years back that the LIRR was looking for new diesel/ electrics to supplement the dual-mode EMD's. Anyone know more?

Bob

Three Rails Are Better Than None 

I don't know, but my grandmother used to take me with a bowl of popcorn to the Valley Stream station to wave at the engineers in the mid 1960's. Then we would go to what I recall as the Borden's bottling plant.

Steamfan77 posted:

To all,

I asked Steve Lynch from the Trainsarefun website about the “Longhorns “ pictured above, and here was the reply:

 

 M3 ex-9775 converted to  #E775 alcohol/sandite car 2018. Photo/Archive: Jeff Erlitz


The LIRR currently uses two M-1 cars to "slime" the rails during falling leaf season. Modified M1's 9401 & 9591 (now E401 & 591) are utilized sandwiched between a pair of MP15's.They operate entirely at night and are serviced at Richmond Hill during the day.

There are also leaf crusher trains. These consist of two MP15's and gravel hoppers. They crush the leaves on the Oyster Bay , Pt. Jeff, Montauk, and Greenport branches. These trains are based at KO and Wellwood siding and operate at night."  

Both sandites and leaf crushers have run on the branch simultaneously, and have been on the branch with both. Leaf crushers are operated on the branch to pulverize leaves that may be wedged in the circuits for the crossing gates. If leaves are not crushed, the potential for leaves to impede a circuit and crossing gates to stay up while a train goes through a crossing increases. All leaf crushers are run at the direction of the train dispatcher.Information courtesy: Ben Jankowski, Oyster Bay RR Museum

 Steve 

 

Paul, I hope that gives a little background. I learned something new too!

Andy

 

 

Thanks, Andy (and Steve). The last few years I was commuting, I road Metro North quite a bit and fondly remember “flat wheel season”   My favorite incident was when we were pulling into the Valhalla stop and the train slid completely through and out of the station. It had to back in and they had to send out a diesel with sanding capability to go ahead of our train (I believe it was a set of M7’s). Ahhhh commuting!!!

Paul

Techno-Peasant of the First Order

Provisionary Member - Brotherhood of the Crappy Basement Layout

 TCA 15-70689

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RSJB18 posted:
Todds Architectural Models posted:

I don't know, but my grandmother used to take me with a bowl of popcorn to the Valley Stream station to wave at the engineers in the mid 1960's. Then we would go to what I recall as the Borden's bottling plant.

https://forgotten-ny.com/2006/...dairies-around-town/

Wow Bob... thanks for that link. When I was a kid we had Renken’s milk delivered in glass bottles. We had a metal insulated box on the front stoop (yes... in Brooklyn, it was a stoop!!!). Can you imagine anyone today using milk that was left in an unlocked box on your stoop???

Paul

Techno-Peasant of the First Order

Provisionary Member - Brotherhood of the Crappy Basement Layout

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Apples55 posted:
RSJB18 posted:
Todds Architectural Models posted:

I don't know, but my grandmother used to take me with a bowl of popcorn to the Valley Stream station to wave at the engineers in the mid 1960's. Then we would go to what I recall as the Borden's bottling plant.

https://forgotten-ny.com/2006/...dairies-around-town/

Wow Bob... thanks for that link. When I was a kid we had Renken’s milk delivered in glass bottles. We had a metal insulated box on the front stoop (yes... in Brooklyn, it was a stoop!!!). Can you imagine anyone today using milk that was left in an unlocked box on your stoop???

When and if, Lionel ever gets its' Milk Car tooling issues resolved, a Renken's Milk Car would be a nice one to have.

Apples55 posted:
RSJB18 posted:
Todds Architectural Models posted:

I don't know, but my grandmother used to take me with a bowl of popcorn to the Valley Stream station to wave at the engineers in the mid 1960's. Then we would go to what I recall as the Borden's bottling plant.

https://forgotten-ny.com/2006/...dairies-around-town/

Wow Bob... thanks for that link. When I was a kid we had Renken’s milk delivered in glass bottles. We had a metal insulated box on the front stoop (yes... in Brooklyn, it was a stoop!!!). Can you imagine anyone today using milk that was left in an unlocked box on your stoop???

Some of my neighbors still had milk delivered to the "stoop" when I was a kid. I had a NY Daily news route so I was out with the milk man every day. We went to Dairy Barn for ours.

Bob

Three Rails Are Better Than None 

MELGAR posted:

Does anyone have any photographic evidence of locomotive #624 having run on the LIRR? This is a K-Line model - I believe of an EMD F10. An engine with the same paint scheme, #413, ran on the Metro-North New Haven Division.

MELGAR

MELGAR_LIRR_EMD_F10_624_02

    

     619-622  PC-7EMD      http://www.trainweb.org/willstrainart/Long_Island.htm

     I could find a #624 any where I looked...  just #619-almost a #623

 

 

                  http://www.trainsarefun.com/li...dieselroster2009.htm   

         

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I mentioned Latham Lumber on the first page of this thread. Here are some pictures I took a few years ago. It’s a great old structure that still stands today. In the third picture, you can still see the tracks that came off of the Oyster Bay Branch. I know it’s ambitious, but I plan to try and scratch build this structure.

Andy

F068FD09-6BB3-43A6-8A07-5F46A3257953233B5BBD-654E-4094-A164-743E85D8139683FF849A-284E-489E-BD9D-1FB18A048F7906CF43DE-6DBE-4B20-916E-DEA47C6C3B6CF195E963-1F0D-4D7D-A42D-12B4BBF5F8EC304ED60E-10CD-4AB1-B079-6979880F7DB6A882611D-BFA8-4324-A75C-E57F3CBAB13C00FE1E45-F677-4C87-92E1-72CF118463F6D3E1DBD0-833B-4149-B801-2C700E8136D43E9F0445-83C0-4380-BDD5-4C3A16D80696B0CB4D86-E9CD-49B6-82B0-979EE007B35F36B0114D-6307-476D-99AE-7D05E81C8E945577C621-7A10-4F96-8265-DE44B4E91B4B

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Old PENN STATION LIRR FLIP SIGN

If there is an electrical guy out there who knows how to make this motor flip the signs, I would appreciate it.

Need a schematic.

LIRR [1)

LIRR [2)

LIRR [3)

LIRR [4)

LIRR [5)

LIRR [6)

LIRR [7)

LIRR [8)

LIRR [9)

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Great photos of Latham Andy. Shows how Home Depot has taken the fun out of lumber shopping. I can still remember going to the lumber yard with my Dad as a kid. They had a huge radial arm saw that always scared the you-know-what out of me when I was little.

Riverhead Lumber on Roslyn Rd. has a similar lumber shed off the back of the building too.

SIRT- where did you get those old flip signs? It was like playing a slots in Atlantic City waiting to see what town came up when they stopped flipping. I'm sure there's a few retired LIRR electricians out there who know all the details on those signs.

Bob

Three Rails Are Better Than None 

Steamfan77 posted:

To all,

I asked Steve Lynch from the Trainsarefun website about the “Longhorns “ pictured above, and here was the reply:

 

 M3 ex-9775 converted to  #E775 alcohol/sandite car 2018. Photo/Archive: Jeff Erlitz

 

 

Until I read the caption, I thought this must be the latest iteration of the "Creedmore Creeper"!

CHOO-CHOO MIKE posted:

What is the "Creedmore Creeper " ?

It was the name given to the passenger trains to Creedmore Psychiatric Hospital by LIRR employees.  The name "Creeper" referred to the speed the trains traveled down the branch but may have had other, less politically correct implications, as well.  The histories of the branch and hospital are quite interesting:

https://wikivisually.com/wiki/Creedmoor_Branch

http://www.trainsarefun.com/li...edmoor/creedmoor.htm

GENERAL NOTICE - Safety is of the first importance in the discharge of duty.  Obedience to the rules is essential to safety.  To enter or remain in the service is an assurance of willingness to obey the rules.

  Thanks for the links Holmes !  In the 60,s us kids would sleigh ride down from the old siding on 249th st. in Queens.  Had to walk or ride over the" big hill " to get to school. You knew you were a big kid when you could ride over the hill on your bike without stopping. Later we would hangout in what was know as pigeon town. The tunnel under the Cross Island Parkway.

CHOO-CHOO MIKE

 Boulder Model Railroad Exposition

December  13 ,14,15 2019

Boulder County Fairgrounds

Longmont ,Colorado

 

 

RSJB18 posted:

Great photos of Latham Andy. Shows how Home Depot has taken the fun out of lumber shopping. I can still remember going to the lumber yard with my Dad as a kid. They had a huge radial arm saw that always scared the you-know-what out of me when I was little.

Riverhead Lumber on Roslyn Rd. has a similar lumber shed off the back of the building too.

SIRT- where did you get those old flip signs? It was like playing a slots in Atlantic City waiting to see what town came up when they stopped flipping. I'm sure there's a few retired LIRR electricians out there who know all the details on those signs.

Bob

Bob, 

I was afraid of that saw too. Riverhead Building Supply took over Latham Lumber on Roslyn Rd. Thankfully places like this still exist.

Andy

Rapid Transit Holmes posted:
CHOO-CHOO MIKE posted:

What is the "Creedmore Creeper " ?

It was the name given to the passenger trains to Creedmore Psychiatric Hospital by LIRR employees.  The name "Creeper" referred to the speed the trains traveled down the branch but may have had other, less politically correct implications, as well.  The histories of the branch and hospital are quite interesting:

https://wikivisually.com/wiki/Creedmoor_Branch

http://www.trainsarefun.com/li...edmoor/creedmoor.htm

Wow, RTH, I haven't heard "Creedmoor in almost 60 years'...When I was a kid, if my friends and me, did something stupid... we would hear' Keep it up, and you'll wind up in "Creedmoor"........(LOL)  

  Ted 

 

 

First photo I have ever seen. Nice. Now as to the freight received... Once again it comes down to CR4s, waybills, etc. of which I find none. ☹ Based on the freight dock it wasn't refrigerated meat products, thus I'll go with other non-refrig commodities as follows:  Wiki: In addition to meatpacking, Swift sold various dairy and grocery items, including Swiftning shortening, Allsweet margarine, Brookfield butter, cheese under the Brookfield, Pauly, and Treasure Cave brands, and Peter Pan peanut butter. Swift began selling frozen turkeys under the Butterball brand in 1954. Gustavus Swift also championed the refrigerated railroad car.  I sure would like to know the lading it received!

 

I think this picture also came from the Mineola Historical Society. The quality isn’t so hot, but it’s the only picture I’ve seen of Wilson & Co., in Mineola. I’d be thrilled if someone else has a better shot. The Oyster Bay Branch is in the foreground, just after it comes off the main. 

Andy

E0851A49-EE0E-4DC1-A327-E20C447F37FD

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MELGAR posted:

The most familiar bridge for me was the one over Post Avenue in Westbury. I guess it will be replaced during the 3rd Track Project.

MELGAR

Mel- the video I posted was the Post Ave bridge getting replaced last year. When they did the job they put up the third span as part of the new structure.

Bob

Three Rails Are Better Than None 

RSJB18 posted:
MELGAR posted:

The most familiar bridge for me was the one over Post Avenue in Westbury. I guess it will be replaced during the 3rd Track Project.

MELGAR

Mel- the video I posted was the Post Ave bridge getting replaced last year. When they did the job they put up the third span as part of the new structure.

Bob

Thanks Bob. I hadn't noticed the link. Whatever anyone says about the MTA or LIRR, they are very capable organizations. My family lived near the Westbury Station when I was a youngster. My father bought Oldsmobiles from Mack Markowitz on Post Avenue, a block or two north of the bridge. Picture below shows an LIRR calendar opened to the month of March 2000 with a photo of G5s 39 on the Post Avenue bridge (photo date March 26, 1954). The calendar has hung on the wall of my train room opened to this photo for 19 years. A reminder of my youth on Long Island.

Another reminder is my MTH model of LIRR G5s 21 which has been on my layout almost as long as the calendar.

MELGAR

MELGAR_LIRR_MARCH_2000_CALENDAR_POST_AVE

MELGAR_LIRR_G5S_21_01

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Steamfan77 posted:

Courtesy of the Mineola Historical Society, this is the Mineola station in September 1923. 

Andy

AF852737-7BF4-4B84-849C-BFD698429925

Thanks, you just made me homesick.  I've been at that station many times when I lived in Mineola and road the LIRR.

Stuart

 

The light at the end of the tunnel is the headlight of an on coming train!

Steamfan77 posted:

Thankfully it does Mel. Great design, as are most of the stations on Long Island.

Andy

Yes Andy, great design for the ones that are still standing. Why they tore down the East Williston station, a real shame, but they tore down Penn Station also, so really, no surprise.

Some pictures of the downtown area behind the Mineola station aka Station Plaza North. The first picture is from the Mineola Historical Society taken from the Mineola Blvd overpass, and I took the second picture at ground level in November of 2017.

Andy

348F13BD-0116-483A-AA99-0E98855C568916FEC5D7-FA8A-4D5A-89F3-6A1A5DF25000

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Passing through Jamaica today, I noticed this passenger car wasting away at the Hillside facility. It looks like it’s a P74B passenger car. This information from the Trainsarefun website: 

P74B DETAILS

Exterior:  Lightweight, arch-roof locomotive-hauled coach; large, square paired windows; diaphragms; four-wheel trucks.

Interior:  84-seat coach; 2/2 reclining seats; mechanical air conditioning; recessed incandescent lighting; full length baggage racks; four toilets.

Modernization:  2/2 reclining seats replaced with 3/2 vinyl reversible seating for 117; three toilets removed; safety chains replaced diaphragms; mechanical air conditioning replaced with undercar diesel generator; electric marker lights.

General:  Built for the Boston & Maine for general long distance service.  Cars were delivered as follows:

          ex-          Date          ex-       Date           ex-       Date

Car #      B&M      Rec’d          Car #      B&M   Rec’d           Car #   B&M   Rec’d

7521       4593       9/9/1958          7531       4602    1/23/1959     7541    4601    5/14/1959

7522       4586       9/9/1958          7532       4606    1/23/1959     7542    4614    5/14/1959

7523       4588       9/9/1958          7533       4610    1/23/1959     7543    4605    5/14/1959

7524       4585       9/9/1958          7534       4612    1/23/1959     7544    4608    5/14/1959

7525       4591       10/15/1958      7535       4613    5/2/1959       7545    4599    5/16/1959

7526       4590       10/15/1958      7536       4604    5/2/1959       7546    4607    7/18/1959

7527       4594       10/15/1958      7537       4611    5/2/1959       7547    4595    7/11/1959

7528       4589       10/15/1958      7538       4609    5/7/1959       7548    4603    7/24/1959

7529       4587       10/15/1958      7539       4597    5/7/1959       7549    4596    7/29/1959

7530       4592       9/9/1958          7540       4598    5/7/1959       7550    4600    8/11/1959

 

EAE0915E-5BC1-486D-A4F8-E9EEDF87D571

Andy

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Quarter Gauger 48 posted:
Rapid Transit Holmes posted:
CHOO-CHOO MIKE posted:

What is the "Creedmore Creeper " ?

It was the name given to the passenger trains to Creedmore Psychiatric Hospital by LIRR employees.  The name "Creeper" referred to the speed the trains traveled down the branch but may have had other, less politically correct implications, as well.  The histories of the branch and hospital are quite interesting:

https://wikivisually.com/wiki/Creedmoor_Branch

http://www.trainsarefun.com/li...edmoor/creedmoor.htm

Wow, RTH, I haven't heard "Creedmoor in almost 60 years'...When I was a kid, if my friends and me, did something stupid... we would hear' Keep it up, and you'll wind up in "Creedmoor"........(LOL)  

Creedmoor, before the "loony bin," was the home of international shooting competitions. Growing up in the NYC metro area, I heard the "You'll wind up in Creedmore" used.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is a great thread, thank you guys for posting all this good stuff.

I moved south out of Long Island in 2003, but have lots of family up there (Bayville, Oyster Bay, Bethpage, Babylon, etc.) and spent over 4 yrs commuting from Bayville to NYC via the Locust Valley station, or Syosset/Hicksville.  My brother commutes from Bethpage to NYC every day, for around 20 yrs now.

Here's a couple pics of me at the Oyster Bay Railroad Museum https://www.obrm.org back in 2016 when I last visited.

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I lived in Bellerose (Hempstead Branch) from 1968 - 1972 and then in Freeport (Babylon Branch) from 1980-1987.  I was an almost daily rider to Penn Station where I went to work, as a conductor, on the PC, Conrail and NJT railroads.  Needles to say, I spent more than 2/3 of my life on trains - commuting on them, taking tickets or drilling them in Sunnyside Yard.  We Conductors (illegally) ran the LIRR MUs, in Penn Station, down to the block for turnaround and boarding of passengers.

Whenever I get back to Long Island to visit family, I take the train in and out of the city.

Ponz 

Steamfan77 posted:

Paul, nice shot of that FA-1. Rich, good to see you went to the OB museum. I’m going there soon, and I’ll take some pictures. Ponz, I bet it brings back memories.

Andy

Andy,

Yes.  Good and bad. I quit the RR in 1987 after 13 years.  When St. Reagan cut the rear brake jobs my roster number took quite a big hit, then the Union lost power.

Ponz

Steamfan77 posted:

A few pictures from the Oyster Bay turntable from two years ago. Hope everyone is enjoying the 4th!

Andy

F4D801F6-F954-42D9-B90E-6F788CE0EFBF

DAFA80AA-2B59-4D13-9C01-D5E20B62339A

Great pics Andy. Glad they saved it instead of building over it. Do you know if it is still operational???

Paul

Techno-Peasant of the First Order

Provisionary Member - Brotherhood of the Crappy Basement Layout

 TCA 15-70689

LCCA RM-39621

LOTS RM-9326

Steamfan77 posted:

Thanks Paul, the Oyster Bay RR Museum is in the process of restoring it and making it operational. I think part of the plan is also trying to convince the MTA to install a switch and lay track to the turntable. I’d kick in a few bucks to see that happen.

Andy

If #35 is ever going to run again on Long Island they will need the turntable to be operational. Wonder if that will ever happen, it sure didn't work out with #39.

http://www.trainsarefun.com/lirr/doubledecker.htm

Rockville Centre :  The double decker is in Tuscan Red with Dulux lettering.  The cars in the distant background look like late 1940s.  Tichy color scheme began in November, 1949 and took several years for all the cars to be repainted.  

Since the transmission poles were on the north side at RVC and as they are visible in the photo, then we are looking northeast and the train is a westbound, early-morning train.  

That means that the temporary tracks, which were south of the original ROW, are NOT those tracks in the photo and the elevated camera angle was taken from somewhere else.  If these WERE the temporary tracks, then there would be signs of construction across the street where the original ROW would have been in the process of being torn up.  

This is not the case, so this is the original ROW and construction has not yet begun. . . . .. That would make the photo no later than the Winter of 1948-49 and the elimination construction has not yet begun. Al so, everyone is bundled up for the winter chill

The station and tracks were placed out of service in April, 1949 and temporary tracks and station facilities placed in service.  The elevated tracks and station were placed in service in July, 1950.
Archive: Jim Gillin Photo: LIRR Research: Dave Keller


#200 Riverhead, NY 08/26/2007

 

Apples55 posted:

I must say, I was surprised when this pic showed up on my Facebook feed... I thought double-deckers were a much more recent addition to commuter fleets. The caption reads:

”LIRR MU Double-decker at Country Life Press, Mineola 1948“.

6BE63CE1-D05C-434C-B306-CE645A934320

LIRR had double-decker cars on the Babylon and Hempstead branches into the 1960s. These cars were my favorites. Used to ride them from New York Penn through Jamaica to Hempstead and Merrick. I remember them as being painted gray.

MELGAR

  • MELGAR posted:
Apples55 posted:

I must say, I was surprised when this pic showed up on my Facebook feed... I thought double-deckers were a much more recent addition to commuter fleets. The caption reads:

”LIRR MU Double-decker at Country Life Press, Mineola 1948“.

LIRR had double-decker cars on the Babylon and Hempstead branches into the 1960s. These cars were my favorites. Used to ride them from New York Penn through Jamaica to Hempstead and Merrick. I remember them as being painted gray.

MELGAR

Upper or lower berth???    

Paul

Techno-Peasant of the First Order

Provisionary Member - Brotherhood of the Crappy Basement Layout

 TCA 15-70689

LCCA RM-39621

LOTS RM-9326

NYandW posted:

http://www.trainsarefun.com/lirr/doubledecker.htm

Rockville Centre :  The double decker is in Tuscan Red with Dulux lettering.  The cars in the distant background look like late 1940s.  Tichy color scheme began in November, 1949 and took several years for all the cars to be repainted.  

Since the transmission poles were on the north side at RVC and as they are visible in the photo, then we are looking northeast and the train is a westbound, early-morning train.  

That means that the temporary tracks, which were south of the original ROW, are NOT those tracks in the photo and the elevated camera angle was taken from somewhere else.  If these WERE the temporary tracks, then there would be signs of construction across the street where the original ROW would have been in the process of being torn up.  

This is not the case, so this is the original ROW and construction has not yet begun. . . . .. That would make the photo no later than the Winter of 1948-49 and the elimination construction has not yet begun. Al so, everyone is bundled up for the winter chill

The station and tracks were placed out of service in April, 1949 and temporary tracks and station facilities placed in service.  The elevated tracks and station were placed in service in July, 1950.
Archive: Jim Gillin Photo: LIRR Research: Dave Keller


#200 Riverhead, NY 08/26/2007

 

Steve;

Thanks for the history lesson - one of my favorite aspects of this Forum is the willingness of so many to share knowledge. One question... what is the “Tichy color scheme”???

Paul

Techno-Peasant of the First Order

Provisionary Member - Brotherhood of the Crappy Basement Layout

 TCA 15-70689

LCCA RM-39621

LOTS RM-9326

Hi Paul:  LIRR Tichy Paint Scheme 1949-1955

Tichy Logo

The Tichy herald  was applied only to the passenger diesels, not the passenger equipment. (November 1949) This herald consisted of a white map of Long Island on a light blue rectangle, offset with a black rectangle giving a shadow effect.  Printed over the map was a large black “plus sign” with the letters L, I, R, R in each corner of the “plus”; these represented the four corners of Long Island served by the Railroad.

On Engines:

1.Orange pilot
2. Light slate gray paint scheme with white numbers
3. LIRR map logo
4. Block lettering

More info here on my page: http://www.trainsarefun.com/lirr/tichy/tichy.htm

 

Best, Steve

NYandW posted:

Glad to help.

 

That is quite the site you have there Steve'.  I lived on the Island  from 52 through 1963.  I JUST WENT THROUGH ALL THE STATIONS in the towns I lived  in.  It was a nice visit down memory lane'..  I appreciate all the work you have put into it.  You've dome an excellent job'..

  Ted 

 

From 1951 to 1958 I lived on 74th Avenue just off Woodhaven Blvd.  I went to PS 113 which was on the other side of the crossing at 88th St.   Sometimes we had to wait for a freight on the way to school.  There was a shanty at the crossing and the gates were manually lowered.  That would have been 56-57 when I was in kindergarten and first grade.

Cam

Hi Folks, I need help with the following photo:MU connections ID view
#1: The 27 point trainline jumper was used to control the locomotive from the cab control / power-pack unit.

#2 and #3: The other two jumpers were for the 650 VDC Head End Power system, a system design unique to LIRR. Does anyone know the size of the four individual conductors in LIRR’s positive power trainline? For comparison, Amtrak uses twelve 4/0 (four ought) conductors in their 480 VAC HEP trainline.

1. You can see there is a fourth jumper located between #2 and #3. What was the function of that fourth jumper?
2. Anyone with color shots of this type material?
3. A a photo that shows these trainline receptacles on the end of a push-pull car

 

Thank you. :-)

 

 

Steamfan77 posted:

Thanks for the pic Paul. And thank you Steve for the additional pics and information. It’s great when people who have lived on the Island (or still do) relate their memories and experiences. 

Andy

Glad I could contribute, Andy, but true “lawn-guy-linders” would dispute that I EVER lived on Long Island... I was born and raised in Brooklyn which IS the western tip of the island. But, to be fair, we Brooklynites would vociferously deny we were from Long Island   

Paul

Techno-Peasant of the First Order

Provisionary Member - Brotherhood of the Crappy Basement Layout

 TCA 15-70689

LCCA RM-39621

LOTS RM-9326

Paul, weird how that worked out. Brooklyn and Queens are physically  on Long Island, but are part of the city. And you’re right, there would be an argument both ways. Funny how someone draws an invisible boundary, and it somehow makes things so different. Notice Long Islanders say they live “on” Long Island. Great pic of the G5s.

Andy

I was born in Brooklyn and raised there and in Queens for my first 18 years (1942-1960). My family always said we were going "out to the island" whenever we went to visit relatives in Hicksville in Nassau County, as if Brooklyn and Queens were NOT already part of Long Island! HA! If they had said "further out", that would have made sense. LOL!

vita sine litteris mors est  (Seneca)

Tinplate Art posted:

I was born in Brooklyn and raised there and in Queens for my first 18 years (1942-1960). My family always said we were going "out to the island" whenever we went to visit relatives in Hicksville in Nassau County, as if Brooklyn and Queens were NOT already part of Long Island! HA! If they had said "further out", that would have made sense. LOL!

It's the "magical" crossing over the Cross Island Parkway effect

The founding fathers of the city included Queens and Brooklyn strictly  for a source of tax revenue.  Native Americans still inhabited Long Island. It all started with Hicksville',  little by little, towns developed to the east and became incorporated, as the natives disappeared ... Reminds me also of the Bronx.  In the early years of development, people, referred to the Bronx as going up state.  Any area outside Manhattan, was considered "Hicksville" Hicks, and hayseeds'............. 

  Ted 

 

But the name Hicksville predates the use of the term "hick" or "hayseed"

From Google:

The name Hicksville recalls the Hicks family, who became local landowners, and more particularly a family member named Valentine Hicks who was a founder of the Long Island Rail Road. Tracks reached Hicksville by 1836.

Back in the 1980's I worked for a hobby shop located in Hicksville.  It was always funny the reaction we'd get from vendors in other states when we placed orders with them.  "How could there be a Hicksville in New York?  We're the hicks, not you!"

Stuart

 

The light at the end of the tunnel is the headlight of an on coming train!

Scotie posted:

But the name Hicksville predates the use of the term "hick" or "hayseed"

From Google:

The name Hicksville recalls the Hicks family, who became local landowners, and more particularly a family member named Valentine Hicks who was a founder of the Long Island Rail Road. Tracks reached Hicksville by 1836.

Google'  and algorithms'... at play'...Even today,  many New York City residents, refer to the Island as the sticks'..... I would imagine, back in 1836, it was no different'...... 

My Mother's sister, Aunt Kay, married into the Hicks family in the 1930s.  They were also very big in the printing business in the city'..........

  Ted 

 

Quarter Gauger 48 posted:
Scotie posted:

But the name Hicksville predates the use of the term "hick" or "hayseed"

From Google:

The name Hicksville recalls the Hicks family, who became local landowners, and more particularly a family member named Valentine Hicks who was a founder of the Long Island Rail Road. Tracks reached Hicksville by 1836.

Google'  and algorithms'... at play'...Even today,  many New York City residents, refer to the Island as the sticks'..... I would imagine, back in 1836, it was no different'...... 

My Mother's sister, Aunt Kay, married into the Hicks family in the 1930s.  They were also very big in the printing business in the city'..........

Just a lot more sticks in 1836.

yankspride4 posted:

Shiny new M9’s spotted in the Ronkonkoma yard. I drop off my grass clippings up the street every week and I always go just a little out of my way to drive by.D5D26E0E-BCA7-4937-A952-2352351FB58E

Nice shot'.  WHat is the condition of the lake theses days?  Three was a restaurant in Ronkonkoma, my folks would drive to from Patchogue , to go to when I was about 7,or 8 .  I remember it being a nice little town, like most LI, towns 60 years ago'....

  Ted 

 

I was born in the Bronx but we moved to Mineola when I was two. I’m a country boy ( to a person who actually lives in the country I’m a city slicker), always have been. The hair on the back of my neck stands up when I cross over the Queens border . Give me a couple of acres and some peace and quiet, and I’m good to go.

Andy